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Spanish Conjunctions Guide: Link Your Thoughts Together

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Conjunctions in Spanish are a crucial part of learning Spanish. They allow you to connect your thoughts, make comparisons, and put sentences together.

Clarity is very important when you’re learning a new language. Not only because the other person will understand what you’re saying, but also because it will build your confidence.

Do you remember when you first decided to learn Spanish? You may still remember how frustrating it was to try having a fluid conversation with a native speaker. You were trying to find the small words to express yourself properly.

We all find ourselves saying: “I have a brother. I have a sister. I have a mother. I do not have a father.”

Well, this is what Spanish conjunctions will do for you. Learning Spanish conjunctions will help you string sentences together: “I have a brother and a sister and a mother, but I do not have a father.”

In this article, you’ll find our Spanish conjunctions list that will show you what small Spanish conjunction words can do for you.

Your thoughts will come out nicely, you’ll be easily understood, and your confidence will increase much faster since you’ll sound like, at the least, an upper-intermediate Spanish learner.

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Table of Contents

  1. Spanish Conjunctions Review: What are Spanish Conjunctions?
  2. Spanish Conjunctions to Correlate Similar Thoughts
  3. Spanish Conjunctions to Express Condition
  4. Spanish Conjunctions to Express Cause
  5. Spanish Conjunctions to Express Opposition
  6. Spanish Adverbial Conjunctions
  7. Spanish Conjunctions that Offer Alternatives
  8. Spanish Subordinating Conjunctions
  9. Spanish Conjunctions that Allow You to Give Reasons
  10. Spanish Subjunctive Conjunctions
  11. Conclusion


1. Spanish Conjunctions Review: What are Spanish Conjunctions?

The first thing we do when trying to learn a new language is to put simple sentences together: “I want a coffee.” Now, it’s time for you to learn how to put these simple sentences together: “I want a coffee and a muffin,” or “I like muffins, but I prefer a cookie.” That’s what Spanish conjunctions are, and how they can help you.

Coffee and Pastries

A conjunction in Spanish is a word that helps you create relationships between words, phrases, clauses, and sentences.

Keep in mind that some conjunctions in Spanish may not have meaning by themselves. They have a different meaning in different contexts, which is why it’s important to know what their functions are and how to use them. Throughout this article, we’ll go over some Spanish conjunctions rules to give you a better idea about their use.

So let’s see some of them in our Spanish conjunctions list!


2. Spanish Conjunctions to Correlate Similar Thoughts

This is the most important—and easy—conjunction in Spanish: y, meaning “and.” It allows you to add more than one sentence together.

We actually overdo this Spanish conjunction quite often. Take a look at what we mean:

  • Me gusta la comida española y la italiana y la francesa y la griega.
    “I like Spanish food and Italian food and French food and Greek food.”

Selection of Different Type of Foods

  • Santiago pidió de comer y pagó toda la cuenta.
    “Santiago ordered the food and paid the whole bill.”
  • El policía me pidió el carné, anotó mis datos y me puso una multa.
    “The police officer asked for my licence, wrote down my information, and I got a fine.”

This use of this Spanish conjunction has an exception where you have to use e instead of y. They mean exactly the same thing, but if your next word or sentence starts with the vowel -i-, you have to use e instead of y.

Why? Well, -i- and -y- in Spanish sound the same, so you have to use -e- to emphasize that you’re adding more information. Let’s see how:

  • María es guapa e interesante.
    “Maria is beautiful and interesting.”
  • Daniel e Isabela se acaban de conocer.
    “Daniel and Isabela just met each other.”

However, if the next word starts with -h-, although this letter has no sound in Spanish, you can use -y-.

  • He comprado agua y hielo.
    “I bought water and ice.”
  • El puente es de acero y hierro.
    “The bridge is from steel and iron.”


3. Spanish Conjunctions to Express Condition

Sentence Patterns

This is our English-Spanish conjunctions list for conjunctions that are used to express a condition. When you use these Spanish conjunctions, you’re expressing a specific condition that must be met for the rest of the sentence to be true or possible.

  • Si: “If”

Si vas a ir al supermercado, compra leche.
“If you are going to the supermarket, buy milk.”

  • En caso de que: “If”; “in case of”

This Spanish conjunction has the same meaning as the English word “if,” but in Spanish it’s used at the beginning of the sentence.

En caso de que decidas venir a la fiesta, compra más cervezas.
“If you decide to come to the party, buy more beers.”

  • Como: “If”

We included this word to our conjunctions in Spanish list because in English, you can just use “if,” but in Spanish this word has a different meaning that the phrase above. You use como if you want to warn someone about something. Let’s see how:

Como no vengas a casa temprano, no sales mañana otra vez.
“If you don’t come home early, you won’t go out again tomorrow.”

  • Siempre que: “If”; “provided”

Siempre que seas honrado todo te saldrá bien.
“Provided you are honest, everything will be fine.”


4. Spanish Conjunctions to Express Cause

Improve Listening

These should be on your Spanish conjunctions worksheets because you need them to express the results and consequences of what you’ve said or done.

  • Así que: “So”

Acabo de llegar a casa así que te llamo luego.
“I have just arrived home, so I will call you back later.”

  • Luego: “So”

This Spanish conjunction may mean the same as Así que, but it’s less common. You’ll see it more in books or literary articles than in speech.

No tengo efectivo, luego no podré comprarme un café.
“I do not have cash on me, so I can’t buy myself a coffee.”

  • De modo que: “So”; “so that”

Salgamos de casa ya, de modo que lleguemos temprano al cine.
“Let’s leave home now so we can arrive early for the movie.”


5. Spanish Conjunctions to Express Opposition

Improve Listening Part 2

This conjunction list will help you express contrast.

  • Pero: “But”

Voy a ir a tu fiesta pero primero tengo que ir a casa.
“I am going to your party, but I have to go home first.”

  • Aunque: “Although”; “even though”

Seguiré buscando trabajo aunque sea difícil
“I will carry on looking for a job, even though it’s still difficult.”

  • Sin embargo: “However”

Me gusta el helado, sin embargo prefiero el yogur cuando estoy en casa.
“I like ice cream; however, I prefer yogurt when I am home.”

  • No obstante: “However”; “nevertheless”

Nos lo pasamos bien en la primera cita, no obstante, no la volví a ver.
“We had a good time on our first date; however, I didn’t see her again.”

  • Por lo demás: “Otherwise”; “apart from that”

No creo que la conclusión esté bien; por lo demás, el ensayo está muy bien.
“I don’t think the conclusion was good; apart from the conclusion, the essay is fine.”

  • Excepto: “Except for”

Me gustan todas las verduras excepto la patatas.
“I like all vegetables except for potatoes.”


6. Spanish Adverbial Conjunctions

Spanish adverbial conjunctions are also known as conjunctive adverbs. They’re adverbs with the characteristics and functions of conjunctions. They join two or more words together, and are used when you want to express the result, purpose, or consequences of something.

Adverbial conjunctions show continuity, joined under casual or situational dependence. The most-used adverbial conjunctions in Spanish are:

  • Cuando: “When”; “if”; “as”; “whenever”

Toda la comida estaba preparada cuando tú llegaste.
“All the food was prepared when you arrived.”

  • Mientras: “While”

Puedes ir comprando palomitas mientras compro las entradas.
“You can buy the popcorn while I’m buying the tickets.”

  • Donde: “Where”

Vivo muy cerca de donde tú trabajas.
“I live pretty close to where you work.”

  • Como: “As”; “like”

Tengo el pelo rizado como tu madre.
“I have curly hair just like your mom.”


7. Spanish Conjunctions that Offer Alternatives

These conjunctions in Spanish help you choose between different alternatives.

  • O: “Or”

¿Quieres café o té?
“Would you like tea or coffee?”

  • U: “Or”

U has the same function that o does, but it’s used whenever the next word starts with -o. This is just like the -e to -y rule from earlier in this article. They sound the same, so you have to change the Spanish conjunction to hear the alternative given.

¿Quieres ir a California u Orlando?
“Do you want to go to California or to Orlando?”

California Car's Plate

¿A qué hora comienza la película, siete u ocho?
“What time does the movie start, at seven or eight?”


8. Spanish Subordinating Conjunctions

Subordinating conjunctions in Spanish allow you to join an independent sentence with a dependent sentence.

A dependent sentence alone wouldn’t make any sense without the independent one, thus these Spanish subordinating conjunctions will help you make sense of the whole sentence, situation, or event.

  • Porque: “Because”

No voy a ir al gimnasio porque me siento muy enferma.
“I am not going to the gym because I am not feeling well.”

  • Pues: “Since”

Deberíamos ir a cine el miércoles, pues creo que es más barato que el sábado.
“We should go to the movies on Wednesday since I think it’s cheaper than Saturday.”

  • Ya que: “Since”; “seeing that”

Voy a ir al mercadillo, ya que tengo que comprar verduras.
“I am going to the street market, since I have to buy vegetables.”

There are other synonyms with the same use as the ones above: dado que, por cuanto, a causa de que, por lo cual… They would be the same translations in English: “because,” “therefore,” “since…”


9. Spanish Conjunctions that Allow You to Give Reasons

This type of conjunction in Spanish allows you to give a reason for why something happens the way it does.

These useful Spanish conjunctions can help you answer the question ¿Por qué?, or “Why?” As for the first one on the list, you’ll simply use the two words together without the accent.

  • Porque: “Because”

No voy a la fiesta porque tengo que trabajar mañana en la mañana.
“I am not going to the party because I am working tomorrow morning.”

  • Ya que; puesto que; en vista de que: “Since”; “because”

No me he comprado un coche ya que no tengo dinero.
“I did not buy myself a car because I do not have any money.'’

No vamos a ir al parque puesto que está lloviendo.
“We are not going to the park because it is raining.”

En vista de que no quieres comer nada, no te daré el helado tampoco.
“Since you haven’t eaten anything, I won’t give you ice cream either.”

Ice Cream

  • Pues: “Because”; “since”; “for”

Hemos decidido vender el coche, pues nos vamos a Inglaterra.
“We have decided to sell the car because we are going to England.”

  • Como: “Since”

Es mejor que cambies de profesión, como has pensado empezar de nuevo.
“It’s better to change your profession since you’ve thought to start again.”


10. Spanish Subjunctive Conjunctions

With some Spanish conjunctions, the subjunctive is needed to express a hypothetical uncertainty as to whether an action or event will take place, or whether or not a situation will happen.

  • A menos que: “Unless”

El gato se quedará dormido a menos que el ratón salga de su escondite.
“The cat will fall asleep unless the mouse gets out of its hideaway.”

  • En caso (de) que: “In case”

Voy a dejar las llaves del coche en caso de que quieras usarlo.
“I am going to leave the car keys in case you want to use them.”

  • Antes de que: “Before”

Antes de que salgas corriendo, déjame la comida preparada.
“Before you run out, leave the food ready for me.”

  • Con tal de que: “So that”

Limpié la casa con tal de que no discutiéramos.
“I cleaned the house so that we wouldn’t fight.”

  • Para que: “So that”

Voy a ir a supermercado para que tengas pan para mañana.
“I am going to the supermarket so that you have bread for tomorrow.”

  • Sin que: “Without”

Habían pasado tres semanas sin que Juan viera a Silvia.
“It had been three weeks without Juan seeing Silvia.”


11. Conclusion

Do you want to sound like a confident Spanish speaker? After this article, and lots of practice with important Spanish conjunctions, you will! These basic Spanish conjunctions will help you link different parts of sentences together. You can use them to include ideas in your sentences, or to exclude them. You have to be very clear about that; after this post, you get it, right?

Here at SpanishPod101, you can find many resources, forums, and even a Spanish conjunctions worksheet for extra Spanish conjunctions practice to help you learn at your own speed. Why don’t you give it a try? You lose nothing and gain more knowledge about our Spanish conjunctions list.

Happy learning!

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Spanish Dates: Days of the Week in Spanish and More

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Writing and saying dates in Spanish is a must when trying to improve your understanding of the language. In today’s world, you may want to write an email, book your next holiday to a Spanish-speaking destination, or set up a date. Or maybe you’re just having trouble reading dates in Spanish. No matter your reasons for learning Spanish, learning how to write dates in Spanish correctly could help you avoid some hassle.

It’s time to learn the dates in Spanish.

Maybe you think it’s enough to translate the numbers and the months…but let me tell you that expressing dates in Spanish is different than doing so in English ( U.K. English or U.S. English).

In this article, you’ll learn the rules for writing dates in Spanish, useful phrases for asking for and telling dates in Spanish, and much, much more about Spanish dates!

Let’s start with the basics.

Table of Contents

  1. Days of the Week in Spanish
  2. Days of the Month in Spanish
  3. Months in Spanish
  4. How to Say Dates in Spanish: Years
  5. How to Write the Date in Spanish
  6. Spanish Vocabulary for Setting Up a Date
  7. Must-Know Phrases to Talk about the Date in Spanish
  8. Using Prepositions When Learning Spanish Dates
  9. Spanish Expressions about Dates
  10. Conclusion: How SpanishPod101 Can Help You Master Spanish Dates

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1. Days of the Week in Spanish

Weekdays

Before getting into writing dates in Spanish format and how to say calendar dates in Spanish, you need to learn the days of the week in Spanish. The first thing you need to know is that in Spanish, the week starts on Monday instead of Sunday. You may have noticed that in the Spanish calendar, the first day is an L, for lunes; this is “Monday.” Unlike some countries, Spain and many other European countries consider Sunday to be the last day of the week, rather than the first.

Sunday is the day of prayer, and the day to go to church. This is also why on most Sundays everything is closed in Spain. Today, in the modern world, things have changed, and Sundays are just a day off for people who work a nine-to-five schedule. Sundays continue to be a day off because of Catholic tradition.

Catholic Church Interior

What are the rest of the days of the week in Spanish?

  • Lunes = “Monday”

Example:
Los lunes han empezado a ser mi día favorito de la semana.
“Mondays are now my favorite day of the week.”

  • Martes = “Tuesday”

Example:
Los martes tengo ensayo con mi grupo de percusión.
“On Tuesdays, I have a rehearsal with my percussion group.”

  • Miércoles = “Wednesday”

Example:
El día que más me cuesta seguir con mi entrenamiento es el miércoles.
“The day that I find most difficult to continue with my training is Wednesday.”

  • Jueves = “Thursday”

Example:
Los jueves empiezo a trabajar a las 8 de la mañana.
“I start working at 8 a.m. on Thursdays.”

  • Viernes = “Friday”

Example:
¡Por fin es viernes!
“Thank God it’s Friday!”

  • Sábado = “Saturday”

Example:
Los sábados aprovecho para salir de fiesta con mis amigos.
“I go out on Saturdays with my friends.”

  • Domingo = “Sunday”

Example:
El domingo es el día del Señor.
“Sunday is God’s day.”

The days of the week in Spanish are all masculine, so you say el lunes for “Monday.” Unlike in English, in Spanish, you don’t need to capitalize the days.

The first five days of the week in Spanish: lunes, martes, miércoles, jueves, and viernes are called días de la semana: “weekdays.” Sábado and domingo are the fines de semana: “the weekend.”

Calendar with Pages Flipping

When learning the days in Spanish, you’ll also notice that in the Spanish calendar, the days of the week are written L M X J V S D. This is because martes, “Tuesday” and miércoles, “Wednesday,” start with M. To avoid confusion, miércoles will always appear as an X.

If you want a fun way to learn about them, you can also sing the days of the week in Spanish with a song!


2. Days of the Month in Spanish

In English, you must use ordinal numbers to say the date. But to say the days of the month in Spanish, you can use cardinal numbers. Uno de marzo: “First of March.”

In some Latin American countries, you may hear: Primero de mayo for “First of May.”

Here’s a list of the cardinal numbers you’ll need for months and dates in Spanish, from one to ten.

  • Uno = “First
  • Dos = “Second
  • Tres = “Third
  • Cuatro = “Fourth
  • Cinco = “Fifth
  • Seis = “Sixth
  • Siete = “Seventh
  • Ocho = “Eighth
  • Nueve = “Ninth
  • Diez = “Tenth

More examples:
Dos de mayo.
“Second of May.”

Note that while in English you must use “1st of May,” when giving dates in Spanish, you don’t need to use 1ero de mayo.

Example:
1 de mayo.
“1st of May.”


3. Months in Spanish

Months

Learning the months of the year in Spanish can be easy because they’re almost the same as in English. Here are the names of the twelve months of the year in Spanish. It’s only Enero meaning “January” that doesn’t start with the same letter.

Another important thing to know when you’re learning the dates in Spanish is that when writing the date in Spanish, you don’t need to capitalize the month. Some may find this an informal way to write dates in Spanish, but it’s not. It’s acceptable.

  • Enero = “January”
  • Febrero = “February”
  • Marzo = “March”
  • Abril = “April”
  • Mayo = “May”
  • Junio = “June”
  • Julio = “July”
  • Agosto = “August”
  • Septiembre = “September”
  • Octubre = “October”
  • Noviembre = “November”
  • Diciembre = “December”


4. How to Say Dates in Spanish: Years

When pronouncing the years in Spanish, you can find one difference.

In English, you can say “twenty-nineteen” (2019) instead of “two-thousand nineteen.” In Spanish, you have to say dos mil diecinueve, instead of veinte diecinueve. This is one of the most common mistakes that English speakers make when learning how to write the date in Spanish. But once you get this down, learning dates in Spanish will be much simpler.

In Spanish, you can still find the use of Roman numerals when writing about centuries. As you may understand them in English, here’s a reminder of the Roman numerals from one to ten: I-II-III-IV-V-VI-VII-VIII-IX-X.

Examples:

  • Esto es el Siglo XX.
    “This is the 20th century.”
  • El carbón fue descubierto en el Siglo II.
    “Carbon was discovered in the 2nd century.”

Another common form to use for an important date in Spanish is by using the acronyms “B.C. (before Christ),” which is a.C (antes de Cristo) in Spanish, and “A.C (after Christ)” or d.C (después de Cristo) in Spanish.

Example:

  • El oro fue descubierto 6000 a.C.
    “Gold was discovered in 6000 B.C.”


5. How to Write the Date in Spanish

Numbers

Now, how are dates in Spanish written out?

When learning how to write the date in Spanish, here’s the formula of how to do it right. Once you know this formula, you’ll never do it wrong again.

                              El+[day of the week]+de+[month]+de+[year]
                                        El 22 de junio de 2019

In Spanish is just the opposite of U.S. English; we use the DD/MM/YY format. A more formal way to say the date in Spanish is:

                    [day of the week], el [day of the month in number] de [month] de [year]
                              Sábado, 22 de junio de 2019

The examples above are the most common way to say the date in Spanish. However, if you want to write about the date in Spanish, there are many different ways you can do this. Also, keep in mind that writing the date varies among Spanish-speaking countries. In Spanish, these are the most popular ways:

1- Numeric

The formula for writing the date in Spanish is Day+Month+Year. However, you can divide the date in different ways:

You can divide them with dots: 12.03.2019; with slashes 12/03/2019; and with hyphens 12-03-2019. You can even omit the zero: 12/3/2019, although it’s more formal to keep the zero.

When writing the year in Spanish, you can also omit the first two numbers instead of writing out the whole of “2019.” You can just write 12/03/19, as long as the shortened year is the current year.

Calendar with Date Highlighted

2- Words and Numbers

Writing the date in Spanish by mixing the numerals with words is very common, especially in setting future dates, since you may want the other person to remember the month. The formula is the same as the numerical one.

                    (number of the day)+de+(name of the month)+de+(numeral of the year)
                              22 de junio de 2019

Example:

  • Nos vemos entonces el 23 de septiembre, 2019.
    “We should see, then, on the 23rd of September, 2019.”

You can also write the whole date as veintidós de junio de dos mil diecinueve or “twenty-two of June of two-thousand and nineteen.” But this is less common.


6. Spanish Vocabulary for Setting Up a Date:

  • Fecha = “Date”
  • Hoy = “Today”
  • Fin de semana = “Weekend”
  • Ayer = “Yesterday”
  • Próxima semana = “Next week”
  • Anteayer o antes de ayer = “The day before yesterday”
  • Mañana = “Tomorrow”
  • Pasado mañana = “The day after tomorrow”
  • Día = “Day”
  • Semana = “Week”
  • Día de la semana = “Weekday”
  • Mes = “Month”
  • Estación = “Season”
  • Año = “Year”
  • Año bisiesto = “Leap year”
  • Siglo = “Century”
  • Milenio = “Millennium”
  • Década = “Decade”


7. Must-Know Phrases to Talk about the Date in Spanish

Time is constantly and consistently present in our lives. We live in a world where we arrange the time for everything. The time to work, the time to study, the time to exercise, and the time to travel. It’s also the number-one topic of conversation topic, because when you’re learning a new language, you’ll always try to set dates to meet others so that you can talk and improve your skills. If you’re trying to break the ice, here are some questions you may ask:

  • ¿Cuándo empieza el verano?
    “When does the summer start?”
  • ¿Cuándo empieza la escuela?
    “When does your school start?”
  • ¿Cuándo es tu cumpleaños?
    “When is your birthday?”
  • ¿Tienes planes para el 14 de febrero?
    “Do you have any plans on the 14th of February?”
  • ¿Qué día es hoy?
    “What day is it today?”

Note that the last phrase is only used as a reminder of the day of the week, because in Spanish it’s also used to ask the day of the month or the completion date.

You’ll also hear questions like: ¿A cuánto estamos hoy? meaning “How far are we today?” or ¿A qué día estamos hoy? meaning “What day are we on today?”

When someone asks the last question, it always refers to the day and also the current month: Hoy es veinticinco de enero meaning “Today is the 25th of January.”


8. Using Prepositions When Learning Spanish Dates

When writing and speaking about the date in Spanish, it’s essential to understand how to use the prepositions correctly. In English, you use “on” when referring to something that happened (or will happen) on a specific date: “The meeting was on Tuesday.” In Spanish, you can use el: La reunión fue el martes. “On” can be translated as en, but you need to learn how to use it appropriately.

Example:

  • Estamos en marzo
    “It’s March.”

Example:

  • Te veo el sabado
    “I will see you on Saturday.”

The prepositions desde-hasta and de-al are normally used to talk about date intervals. Unlike in English, where you just need to use “from” or “to.”

Example:

  • El verano es desde junio hasta septiembre.
    “Summer is from June until September.”

Example:

  • Estaré de vacaciones del 2 al 20 de agosto.
    “I will be on vacation from 2nd to 20th August.”

The use of the preposition del in Spanish is the union of de + el= del.

Example:

  • Hoy es 14 de abril del 2019.
    “Today is the 14th of April of 2019.”

Another important preposition to learn is durante. Durante means “during” and “throughout.” In Spanish, you can use durante whenever you want to talk about a date occurring during a certain timeframe.

Examples:

  • La globalización habrá empezado durante el siglo XIX.
    “Globalization may have started during the 19th century.”
  • Sarah ha estado en forma durante toda su vida.
    “Sarah was very fit throughout her life.”


9. Spanish Expressions about Dates

Understanding an expression when learning a new language is the best way to know if you’re improving. Keep these Spanish expressions in mind. Make jokes while learning and leveling up!

Woman Having an Idea

  • Gracias al mundial de fútbol, los hoteles están haciendo su agosto.
    “Thanks to the FIFA World Cup, hotels are having a field day.”

This expression means that August is one of the most touristic months. In Spain, this is when everyone takes holidays, so the tourist companies are having a field day.

  • Siempre estás en medio como los jueves.
    “You’re always in between like Thursdays!”

This expression may not need any explanation. But basically, Thursdays are in the middle of the week (no one likes the middle of the week!), so when someone’s disturbing you, you can tell them this.

  • En abril aguas mil.
    “In April it rains a lot.”

This expression is about the weather. April is a rainy month in Spain.

  • Cuando en marzo mayea, en mayo marcea.
    “If in March mayea, in May marcea.”

This expression is also about the weather. It means that if March is like the weather in May, May will be like the weather in March.

  • Como agua de mayo.
    “Like May’s water.”

This expression comes from the life in the countryside. April and May are rainy months which are perfect for the plantations. The rain allows the fruit trees to bloom in their greatest splendor. So, if someone says Como agua de mayo, it means that something has come perfectly and at the right time.

Example:

  • La paga extra de verano me viene como agua de mayo!
    “The summer extra pay comes like May’s water!”


10. Conclusion: How SpanishPod101 Can Help You Master Spanish Dates

So next time you’re planning a trip with your fellow Spanish friends, you can be certain that your date matches theirs. This way, you can enjoy planning events, holidays, and days out, while also ensuring that you’ll be there at the right time.

What did you find most useful in this article? What are you still struggling with? Let us know in the comments! Remember that when it comes to dates in Spanish, practice is essential. Why not leave us a comment with today’s date in Spanish too? :)
You can also download our dates vocabulary sheet for free and have it on hand for any questions you may have.

SpanishPod101 has many free vocabulary lists about the Spanish days of the week, months in Spanish, and how to write the date in Spanish. Get cracking!

With enough studying, practice, and determination, you’ll be speaking Spanish like a native! And SpanishPod101 will be here for every step of your language-learning journey.

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The Best Guide to Naming Your Family in Spanish

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Do you know the top reasons for learning Spanish? In today’s world, you’re very likely to have a friend, family member, or a loved one who speaks Spanish. Learning to name the family members in Spanish is the best place to start when seeking to learn their language, because family in Spanish-speaking countries is a strong institution. That’s also why these cultures are so welcoming.

Learn the different ways to say “mother” in Spanish and “father” in Spanish. No matter the reasons you want to learn Spanish, practice how to say family member names in Spanish so next time you’re invited to spend your summer holiday with your lover’s family, you can impress them with your conversation comprehension.

So how do you talk about the family in Spanish? If you’ve ever visited Spain or stayed in Spain for a lengthy period of time, you’ve probably noticed the use of diminutives quite often: Tita, Abuelita, and even Andreita. This is one of the most common ways that family in Spanish cultures speaks to each other. It often means that you have a close relationship with your family members.

In Spain, it’s very common for the whole family to gather on Sundays to have lunch, and if you ever get invited to one, you’ll notice how they name family members in Spanish. You may feel confused as to why they use so many terms for “mother” in Spanish or “father” in Spanish, especially in terms of these diminutives. But don’t worry. If you’re called Pablito, that means they’re getting to know you better and they consider you part of the family as well.

In this article, you’ll learn how to talk about the Spanish family tree, go over some family in Spanish vocabulary, and read some Spanish sentences about family members to help you understand how it’s used! Let’s get started!

Table of Contents

  1. Gender and Family Members in Spanish
  2. Family Tree in Spanish
  3. Terms for Relatives
  4. Family Member Terms as a Married Person
  5. Endearment Terms to Name Family Members in Spanish
  6. Spanish Idioms about Family Members
  7. Fun Facts to Help You Learn Spanish
  8. Polysemy of Words in the Spanish Language
  9. Conclusion: Let SpanishPod101 Help You Master Spanish!

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1. Gender and Family Members in Spanish

Parents Phrases

When learning Spanish, it’s vital to know that Spanish is a phonetic language: every single letter is pronounced. Like English, Spanish may be considered an easy language to learn. As a beginner, you may be surprised to find that there are rarely any surprises in spelling or pronunciation. Spanish is also considered the second most spoken language in the world because it’s spoken in about twenty-one countries today; it has millions of native speakers in the Americas and Spain.

So before we begin talking about things like how to describe family in Spanish, we’ll go over some basic rules you should know.

1- O and A

Knowing how to correctly name family members in Spanish begins with realizing that Spanish is grammatically gendered. Spanish nouns are classified as either masculine (often ending in -o) or feminine (often ending in -a).

One example of this difference between English and Spanish is when you use the masculine and the feminine primo and prima. In English, “cousin” is used for both male and female cousins, whereas in Spanish they differ by the ending vowel (-o or -a).

Example:

  • Primo = “Male cousin”
    • Yo tengo un primo que se llama Alejandro.
    • “I have a cousin named Alejandro.”
  • Prima = “Female cousin”
    • Mi prima se llama Andrea.
    • “I have a cousin named Andrea.”

An exception is:

  • Marido = “Husband”
  • Esposa = “Wife”

Note that its feminine form is not marida.

Another difference between English and Spanish is how you refer to both male and female siblings. The masculine-sounding Los hermanos in Spanish refers to both your brothers and sisters, whereas “siblings” is a gender-neutral word.

Example:
Yo tengo dos hermanos: José y Mónica.
“I have two siblings: José and Mónica.”

2- Masculine and Feminine Articles

The use of articles when you’re talking about a family member in Spanish also helps new learners understand gender use in Spanish.

Female articles: La, las, una, unas.
Male articles: El, los, un, unos.

Example:
La prima de Juan se llama Andrea.
“Juan’s cousin is Andrea.”

Example:
Juana es la nuera de mi madre.
“Juana is my mother’s daughter-in-law.”


2. Family Tree in Spanish

Family Words

If you’re a beginner in Spanish, one of the best ways to practice is by talking about your family (and extended family) in Spanish. Family reunions in Spain and Latin-America are a strong part of their culture, so if you’re ever invited to a family party, here are some questions you may ask when practicing your Spanish. But first, some must-know terms for family members in Spanish and other Spanish family vocabulary.

  • Mi familia = “My family”
  • Abuela = “Grandmother”
    • Example:
      ¿Cómo se llama tu abuela?
      “What is your grandmother’s name?”
  • Abuelo = “Grandfather”
    • Example:
      ¿En qué trabaja tu abuelo?
      “What does your grandfather do?”
  • Madre = “Mother”
    • Example:
      ¿Cuántos años tiene tu madre?
      “How old is your mother?”
  • Padre = “Father”
    • Example:
      ¿Dónde vive tu padre?
      “Where does your father live?”
  • Hermano = “Brother”
    • Example:
      ¿Tu hermano tiene hijos?
      “Does your brother have any children?”
  • Hermana = “Sister”
      Example:
      ¿A qué se dedica tu hermana?
      “What does your sister do for a living?”


3. Terms for Relatives

Once you’ve got the family tree in Spanish, including its vocabulary and Spanish use of gender, you can continue the conversation. Here are some questions your may be asked by “relatives” (parientes or familiares), and some more family vocabulary:

  • Tío = “Uncle”
    • Example:
      ¿Tu cuántos tíos tienes por parte de tu madre?
      “How many uncles do you have on your mother’s side?”
  • Tía = “Aunt”
    • Example:
      ¿Es Miryam la tía más joven que tiene Abigail?
      “Is Miryam the youngest aunt that Abigail has?”
  • Primo = “Male cousin”
    • Example:
      ¿Cuántos años tiene tu primo Alejandro?
      “How old is your cousin Alejandro?”
  • Prima = “Female cousin”
    • Example:
      Yo tengo una prima que se llama Andrea.
      “I have a cousin named Andrea.”
  • Sobrina = “Niece”
  • Sobrino = “Nephew”
    • Example:
      ¿Tú tienes sobrinos?
      “Do you have any nieces or nephews?”


4. Family Member Terms as a Married Person

Newlywed Couple

  • La familia política = “The in-laws.” It refers to the people that one is related to through marriage.
  • Cuñado = “Brother-in-law”
    • Example:
      Mi cuñado me ha prestado su coche.
      “My brother-in-law lent me his car.”
  • Cuñada = “Sister-in-law”
    • Example:
      Mi cuñada está muy enamorada de mi hermano.
      “My sister-in-law is very much in love with my brother.”
  • Yerno = “Son-in-law”
    • Example:
      Mi yerno es abogado.
      “My son-in-law is a lawyer.”
  • Nuera = “Daughter-in-law”
    • Example:
      ¿Cómo se dice nuera en Español?
      “How do you say daughter-in-law in Spanish?”
  • Suegra = “Mother-in-law”
    • Example:
      Mi suegra cocina muy bien.
      “My mother-in-law is a great cook.”
  • Suegro = “Father-in-law”
    • Example:
      El suegro de mi hermana es muy amable.
      “My sister’s father-in-law is very kind.”

Unlike in English, in Spanish there are two terms to name the mother-/father-in-law of your son: consuegra or consuegro, respectively.

  • Consuegra = “Mother-in-law of your son”
    • Example:
      Mi consuegra cocina muy bien.
      “My son’s mother-in-law is a great cook.”
  • Consuegro = “Father-in-law of my son”
    • Example:
      Mi consuegro es un funcionario público.
      “My son’s father-in-law is a public officer.”


5. Endearment Terms to Name Family Members in Spanish

Family Quotes

Your Spanish family members vocabulary won’t be complete until you know some of the most common endearment terms for different family members.

In Spanish, we use diminutive terms to name our loved ones. When learning Spanish, it’s very interesting to know that the use of diminutive words may mean that the relationship is very close. You just need to add the suffix -ito to the end of the word.

Example:

  • Abuelito instead of abuelo (or “grandpa” in English)
  • Tita instead of tía (or “aunt” in English).

Some relatives can be named in two ways. For example, you can use padre/papá for “father” in Spanish and madre/mamá for “mother” in Spanish. Generally, kids name their mother mamá and their father papá. Mamá and papá should have an accent on the last vowel, otherwise they mean something different.

Ways to name your mother with affection:
Ma
Mamá
Amá

Ways to name your father with affection:
Pa
Papá
Apá

Ways to name your grandfather with affection:
Yayo
Abuelito
Abu

Ways to name your grandmother with affection:
Yaya
Nana
Abuelita
Abu


6. Spanish Idioms about Family Members

Family at the Mall

If you’ve been learning Spanish for some time now, and you would like to take your learning to the next level, we’ll present you with the most common Spanish idioms that involve family members.

If you take the English expression “like father, like son,” note that in Spanish, you can use the expression de tal palo tal astilla which means exactly the same thing. Expressions in the Spanish language are based on culture; they should never be translated literally, so be careful because they vary among all native Spanish speakers.

Idioms like the ones below always give a fresh and different touch to the conversation, and are a great sign that you’re ready for the next level of learning. Enjoy the ride!

1- Parece que no tienes abuela

Literal translation:
“It seems that you don’t have a grandmother.”

Meaning:
When someone has a high opinion of themselves, you can say: Parece que no tienes abuela. Why? Grandmothers normally praise their grandchildren, so this expression is used to say that someone doesn’t need a grandmother because they praise themselves instead.

Example:
A: La noche del viernes me corté el pelo de tal manera que todas las chicas a mi alrededor iban girándose por la calle y admirando mi melena.

B: Vaya Juan… ¡parece que no tienes abuela!

—–

A: “Friday night I got a haircut in such a way that all the girls around me were doing double takes on the street and admiring my beautiful hair.”

B: “Waoo Juan…it seems that you don’t need a grandmother!”

2- Salirse de madre

Literal translation:
“To get out of mother.”

Meaning:
This phrase is used when excess of something is involved. “Do you know when is enough?” could be a rough English equivalent. In fact, its origin goes back to when it rained so much that the rivers overflowed.

Example:
La fiesta en casa de Alberto empezó bien hasta que nos bebimos 3 copas y se salió de madre
“The party at Alberto’s house was fine till we had three drinks and it got out of mother.”

3- Ciento y la madre

Literal translation:
“A hundred and the mother.”

Meaning:
This expression is used when an area is very crowded, so you don’t know how many people there are.

Example:
Vinieron todos los amigos de Lorenzo y eran ciento y la madre.
“When all of Lorenzo’s friends came, they were a hundred and the mother.”

4- Cuando seas padre, comerás huevos

Literal translation:
“When you are a father you will eat eggs.”

Meaning:
In Spain, you can use this expression when someone doesn’t have enough experience in something; perhaps he/she is too young or just lacks knowledge. This expression relates to the past, when eggs were a very appreciated food. In fact, the father was the only one who was able to have eggs at all, so when his children asked for eggs, the mother used to say: “When you’re a father, you’ll eat eggs.”

Example:
A: Mami, mañana me gustaría volver a las tres de la mañana con el resto de mis amigos.
B: No hijo, a la una como siempre. Cuando seas padre comerás huevos.

A: “Mum, I would like to come back home tomorrow at three a.m. with the rest of my friends.”
B: “No dear, at one a.m. as always. When you are a father you will eat eggs.”

5- Éramos pocos y parió la abuela

Literal translation:
“We were few and the grandmother gave birth.”

Meaning:
This is the Spanish translation of Murphy’s Law. When everything is going wrong, and suddenly even more bad things happen, you can say: Éramos pocos y parió la abuela.

Example:
¡Éramos pocos y parió la abuela! No tuve suficiente con que se me rompiera el coche sino que además también tuve que cambiar la cerradura de casa porque me dejé las llaves dentro.

“We were few and the grandmother gave birth! It wasn’t enough when my car broke down, I also had to change my house’s lock because I left my keys inside.”


7. Fun Facts to Help You Learn Spanish

Father and Son

Terms like amigovio or follamigo are allowed by the Spanish Royal Academy (RAE). However, keep in mind that they’re used colloquially to refer to a person with whom one has a romantic or sexual relationship. It’s not formal. In English, this would be a “friend with benefits.” Amigovios is used more in Latin- American countries, and follamigo in Spain.

Amigo (friend) + Novio (boyfriend) = Amigovio
Follar (“f***) + Amigo (friend) = Follamigo

Example:
Somos amigovios.
“We are just friends with benefits.”


8. Polysemy of Words in the Spanish Language

When learning Spanish, polysemic words are a common problem for beginners who are discovering new vocabulary, because a word with several meanings is normally used for context-specific purposes. We have to admit that when learning a new language, it’s very funny when understanding that esposas means both “wives” and “handcuffs.”

  • Esposas = “Handcuffs”
    • Example:
      El policía tiene un par de esposas.
      “The police officer has a pair of handcuffs.”
  • Esposa = “Wife”
    • Example:
      Los cristianos no pueden tener muchas esposas.
      “Christians cannot have multiple wives.”
  • Gemelos = “Twin”
    • Example:
      Mi amigo Andrés tiene un gemelo.
      “My friend Andres has a twin.”
  • Gemelo = “Calf muscle”
    • Example:
      Me duelen los gemelos después de ir al gimnasio.
      “My calf muscles hurt after the gym.”
  • Gemelos = “Opera glasses”
    • Example:
      Para ir a ver ópera hay que llevar gemelos sino no podrás ver nada.
      “To go to the opera you must bring your binoculars, otherwise you will not see anything.”
  • Gemelos = “Cufflinks”
    • Example:
      Voy a comprarle a mi padre un par de gemelos para su cumpleaños.
      “I am going to buy my father a pair of cufflinks for his birthday.”


9. Conclusion: Let SpanishPod101 Help You Master Spanish!

So next time you’re at a party and encounter a Spanish speaker, you should ask about their family; there’s no better ice breaker, don’t you agree? They enjoy talking about their extended families. You can also download our Family and Relatives Cheat Sheet for free and have it on hand for any questions you may have!

SpanishPod101 has prepared a list of useful Spanish gender pronouns to help you establish a conversation about family members for your studies.

SpanishPod101 has many vocabulary lists available on our website for you to consult for free, and of course our Spanish Resource Corner for any other questions you may have. Why don’t you prepare a self-introduction, including your family members, in the comment section below?

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74 Common Spanish Travel Phrases

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One of the most common answers language learners give when we’re asked why we chose to learn that language is because we like the country or countries where it’s spoken. Therefore, it’s not a surprise that if you’re learning Spanish, you might like to visit Spain. So why not learn Spanish travel words and phrases?

Whether you choose to travel to Spain for a short holiday or for a longer time, here you’ll learn all the vocabulary you need to find your way in Madrid, Barcelona, Seville, or any other city you want to visit. You probably already know that Spanish people aren’t that great at speaking English, especially in small towns, so if you want to avoid misunderstandings, this is the way to go.

Our purpose today is to teach you some common Spanish travel phrases that will help you be understood if you need help while you’re traveling in Spain—or if you want to order food, book a hotel room, get a cab, or take the bus. But even more importantly, we’re going to help you understand the answers you’ll receive!

Surely you don’t want to ask a local how to get to your hotel only to not understand the answer. That would make the whole process of learning the questions quite useless, wouldn’t it? Well, there’s no need to worry, because we’re making sure our guide of Spanish for travelers includes all of the Spanish phrases for travel you’ll need.

Without further ado, let’s delve into our list of useful Spanish words for tourists!

Table of Contents

  1. Ten Basic Expressions
  2. Nine Simple Conversation Phrases
  3. Nine Basic Spanish Phrases for Travel
  4. Seven Sentences You Might Need When Shopping
  5. Nine Sentences You Might Need in a Restaurant
  6. Nine Sentences to Ask for and Give Directions
  7. Six Expressions You Might Need in Case of an Emergency
  8. Five Flattery Phrases
  9. Ten Useful Phrases to Go through Language Problems
  10. How SpanishPod101.com Can Help You Learn Spanish

Log


1. Ten Basic Expressions

Preparing To Travel

Let’s start from the beginning. It’s practically impossible to have a proper conversation without using any of these basic expressions, so you’re going to need them. If you already know them, don’t worry; you can skip this section! And keep in mind that to hear these Spanish travel phrases with pronunciation, as well as more Spanish words and phrases, you can visit our vocabulary lists on our website.

1- Hola

As most of you might already know, Hola means “Hello.” It’s by far the most commonly used greeting in Spanish and can be used at any time of the day.

If you would like to learn more ways of greeting someone, you can check out our article How to Say Hello in Spanish.

2- Gracias

Once again, this is one of the most common Spanish words. It means “Thank you” and it’s obviously a basic word in many conversations. We would like our tourists to be polite, so we hope you use it a lot!

3- De nada

Now you know how to say “Thank you,” but do you know what to say after someone thanks you in Spanish? De nada literally means “Of nothing” and it translates to “You’re welcome.”

4-

In our first list of basic expressions in Spanish, we can’t forget to include words like “Yes” and “No.” Again, you probably already knew that means “yes,” but here it is just in case!

5- No

This is clearly one of the easiest travel phrases in Spanish for most of you. No in Spanish means “no.”

6- Lo siento

Lo siento is one of the most common ways of saying “I’m sorry” in Spanish and you can use it the majority of the time when you wish to apologize to someone. But if you would like to know what the most appropriate expression is for different situations, feel free to read our article on How to Say “Sorry” in Spanish.

7- No hablo español

If you don’t feel comfortable enough speaking Spanish yet, it might be useful for you to be able to say “I don’t speak Spanish.” If you want to apologize for not speaking Spanish, remember that you can combine it with the previous expression on the list: Lo siento, no hablo español.

8- Me gusta

Whenever you want to express that you like something, you can say Me gusta. If you want to be specific and say what it is that you like, you can add a verb in its infinitive form, a noun, or a pronoun.

Example: Me gusta bailar.
Translation: “I like dancing.”

Example: Me gustan los helados.
Translation: “I like ice cream.”

9- No me gusta

If you don’t like something, all you need to do is add no just before me gusta.

Example: No me gusta correr.
Translation: “I don’t like running.”

10- Por supuesto

The last expression on this list might not be as important as the rest, but it’s still good to know. Por supuesto means “of course.”


2. Nine Simple Conversation Phrases

Survival Phrases

Besides the basic expressions we just saw, there are a few sentences you might need to know so that you can have a basic conversation when you meet someone for the first time. These are often included in some of the first lessons when you start learning a language, but they’re always good to review.

You might want to take a look at our Top 10 Sentence Patterns for Beginners in case you’re not too familiar with them yet.

1- ¿Cómo te llamas?

One of the first questions you might ask someone you just met is “What’s your name?” This is one of the key Spanish travel phrases you should know, especially when it comes to forming relationships while in Spain.

2- Me llamo Ana / Soy Ana.

Obviously, if you learn how to ask what someone’s name is, you also need to know how to reply! Two of the most common ways of saying “My name is…” are Me llamo… or Soy… followed by your name. The last one only means “I’m…” but just like in English, it’s still an option.

3- ¿Cuántos años tienes?

This is another common question: “How old are you?” Interestingly, when we talk about our age in Spanish, we use the verb tener, which means “to have.” This means that the literal translation to this question is “How many years do you have?”

4- Tengo 25 (veinticinco) años.

As mentioned above, the literal translation to this answer is “I have 25 years.” Of course, it translates to “I am 25 years old.”

If you’re not yet comfortable with numbers in Spanish, we have you covered: check out our Numbers in Spanish article.

5- ¿De dónde eres?

This question means, “Where are you from?” Because people are normally curious when they hear a foreign accent or language, it tends to be heard quite frequently when someone’s traveling.

6- Soy de Australia / Soy australiano/a.

There are two different ways of replying to the previous question, and they’re very similar to what you would say in English. Soy de Australia means, “I am from Australia,” and Soy australiano (or australiana) means “I’m Australian.”

To learn more nationalities in Spanish, take a look at our Spanish Vocabulary for Nationalities.

7- ¿Dónde vives?

And finally, here’s our last basic question. ¿Dónde vives? means “Where do you live?”

8- Vivo en Londres

As you might expect, this sentence is the answer to the previous question. Vivo en Londres means “I live in London.” We chose this city because its name is a bit different than it is in English.

Now you might be wondering if all cities have different names in Spanish. Well, luckily, this doesn’t always happen, but it does happen sometimes. Normally, when they’re not that easy to pronounce for Spanish speakers, the names will be changed. Here’s a list of Names of World Cities in Spanish that might help you.

9- ¿Me puedes sacar una foto?

This sentence isn’t as important as the rest, but it’s still really useful to know when you’re traveling. If you travel solo and your parents want to see how you’re doing on your travels, but you’re not a big fan of selfies, you’re going to have to ask someone to take a photo of you.

The way of asking “Could you take a photo of me?” in Spanish is ¿Me puedes sacar una foto?

Of course, if you’re traveling as a couple or even with a group, you might still want to ask a local to take a photo of you. You can ask this question in the plural by saying: ¿Nos puedes sacar una foto?

For a few more useful questions, take a look at our Top 15 Spanish Questions You Should Know for Conversations.


3. Nine Basic Spanish Phrases for Travel

Airplane Phrases

Let’s get to more specific and useful Spanish travel phrases. Regardless of where you’re traveling, you’ll be taking cabs, trains, or buses. This is why we’ve listed a few sentences you might need if you take any of these means of transportation.

In each of these examples, we’ve marked in bold the most important part of the sentence. So, if you need to use any of these essential Spanish travel phrases for transportation, you’ll use the part in bold and change the rest of the sentence whenever you need to.

1- Three Sentences You Will Need When You Take a Cab

  • ¿Dónde puedo coger un taxi?
    Translation: “Where can I take a cab?”
  • Me puedes llevar a la calle San Juan, ¿por favor?
    Translation: “Could you take me to Saint John’s Street, please?”
  • Al aeropuerto, por favor.
    Translation: “To the airport, please.”

2- Three Sentences You Will Need When You Take a Train

  • Dos billetes para ir a Pamplona, por favor.
    Translation: “Two tickets to go to Pamplona, please.”
  • Un billete de ida y vuelta a Madrid, por favor.
    Translation: “One round-trip ticket to Madrid, please.”
  • ¿En qué andén se coge el tren R5?
    Translation: “On which platform can I take the R5 train?”

People

3- Three Sentences You Will Need When You Take a Bus

  • ¿Me puedes avisar cuando lleguemos al Museo del Prado?
    Translation: “Could you let me know when we arrive to the Museo del Prado?”
  • ¿Dónde me bajo para visitar la catedral?
    Translation: “Where do I get off to visit the cathedral?”
  • ¿Qué autobús tengo que coger para ir a Valencia?
    Translation: “What bus do I need to take to get to Valencia?”


4. Seven Sentences You Might Need When Shopping

Basic Questions

No matter what kind of trip you’re on, you’ll need to buy something at some point. It could be food, clothes, medicine…who knows. We’ve put together a few sentences you might need in order to buy something in Spain. These may be more advanced Spanish phrases for travel, but you can definitely master these with enough practice!

1- ¿Cuánto cuesta?

When we’re shopping, we sometimes need to ask about the price of a product, more often than not due to misplaced price tags. This is why asking “How much does this cost?” is such an important question to know. Obviously, the answer to this question is even more important. Here’s an example of how a conversation might go:

Example:
A: Perdona, ¿cuánto cuesta esta chaqueta?
B: Cuesta 35 (treinta y cinco) euros.

Translation:
A: “Excuse me, how much does this jacket cost?”
B: “It costs 35 euros.”

In case you skipped the simple conversation section in this article, we’ll remind you once more that if you want to know more about numbers in Spanish, you can check out our Numbers in Spanish article.

2- ¿Qué me recomiendas?

This question means, “What’s your recommendation?” and you might need to use it when you’re not sure what to get.

For example, one thing we’re really proud of in Spain is our jamón. You might want to try it when you visit Spain, but when you come to our supermarkets or restaurants and see all the different kinds we have, you might be confused.

In our example, because we’re asking for a specific recommendation, we’ll add a noun—the thing we’re interested in—after qué. This is optional except when what you’re referring to isn’t that obvious.

Example:
A: Qué jamón me recomiendas?
B: Este es buenísimo y no es muy caro.

Translation:
A: “What ham do you recommend?”
B: “This one is really good and it’s not too expensive.”

Ham

3- Quiero cambiar dólares a euros.

When traveling, you might need to exchange your currency for the local one, which in this case is the Euro. Specifically, the translation of this sentence is, “I want to exchange dollars for euros.”

For more information on talking about money or currency in Spanish, you might find it useful to check this vocabulary list of Words Related to Trade.

4- ¿Cómo puedo conseguir un descuento?

You might not be able to use this one as often as the other sentences on this list, depending on where you are, but it’s still good to know how to ask the question, “How can I get a discount?”

5- ¿Tienes esta camisa en otro color?

In case you see a shirt you like, but you can’t stop thinking that it would look better in a darker color, you might want to know how to ask ¿Tienes esta camisa en otro color? which means “Do you have this shirt in a different color?”

Other similar questions you might need to ask include asking for a different size. Here’s an example:

Example:
A: Perdona, ¿tienes estos pantalones en una talla más grande?
B: Lo siento, solo tenemos esta talla o una más pequeña.

Translation:
A: “Excuse me, do you have these trousers in a bigger size?”
B: “I’m sorry, we only have this size or a smaller one.”

6- ¿Se puede pagar con tarjeta?

You’ll never have to ask “Can I pay by card?” in a big supermarket, but it might be helpful if you’re buying something in a small store, or in a local market.

Girl

7- ¿Dónde hay un cajero?

In case the answer to the previous question is “No” and you currently don’t have any cash on you, you’re going to need to ask where the nearest ATM is. The way to ask this is ¿Dónde hay un cajero?

If you think you might have trouble understanding the possible answers to this question, keep reading this article!


5. Nine Sentences You Might Need in a Restaurant

Chef Cooking

When it comes to Spanish travel and tourism vocabulary, we think that restaurant words and phrases just about top the list.

In this section, we’ve included a few sentences you’ll need in a restaurant. However, if we started listing all the vocabulary you would need to order food, we would be here all night long, so this is why we recommend our video All Food and Restaurant Phrases You Need. In this video, Rosa will explain everything you need to know about food in general, and also about Spanish food.

1- Mesa para dos, por favor.

Unless you’re at a fast-food restaurant, normally one of the first things you’ll have to tell the waiter is how many people will be eating, so that they can pick the right table for you. This situation can take place in a few different ways.

For example, the waiter might ask you as soon as you walk in how many people there will be. There are a few ways they can ask you this question, but the one thing we know for sure is that it will include the word cuántos, which means “how many.” He could ask ¿Cuántos son? which means “How many are you?” or ¿Mesa para cuántos? which means “Table for how many?” among others. If you’re asked this question, you can just say the number, or the magic sentence in the title.

There’s a second way this could happen: the waiter might count how many people he sees before asking that question. For example, if he counts four people, he might directly ask: ¿Mesa para cuatro?, which means, “Table for four?” If he gets the number right, you can just reply . If he gets it wrong, you can correct him with the right number.

Finally, the third way this situation could go. You could be faster than the waiter and say Mesa para dos, por favor, which means “Table for two, please.” We previously said this is a magic sentence; let us explain why. If you’re still nervous whenever you need to speak Spanish and you didn’t understand what the waiter said to you, they’ll completely understand if you just say these words. Just like that, you’re in! Now let’s get you ready for what comes right after that.

2- ¿Cuál es el menú del día?

It’s common for Spanish restaurants to have a special menu for each day. Before deciding what you want to order, you can ask them ¿Cuál es el menú del día? which means “What’s the menu of the day?”

If you don’t like the special menu, don’t worry, because they’ll always have more options on the regular menu.

3- Por favor, ¿me tomas nota?

It’s quite likely that the waiter will approach you after you’ve been deciding what to get for a while. But in case you’re getting hungry and the waiter hasn’t asked what you would like to eat yet, when you see him you can ask him Por favor, ¿me tomas nota? which translates to “Can you write down my order, please?”

4- ¿Qué van a tomar?

Once the waiter has approached your table, you’ll be asked what you would like to order. It’s common for waiters to use the formal usted instead of , so the sentence we’ve suggested, ¿Qué van a tomar?, uses that form.

Another similar question the waiter might ask you is: ¿Ya han decidido qué van a tomar? which means “Have you decided what you’re going to have?”

Notice that both examples are in the plural. If you were eating by yourself in the restaurant, the waiter would ask ¿Qué va a tomar? instead.

Waiter

5- Yo tomaré…

Of course, if you’re eating in a restaurant, you need to know how to tell your waiter what you would like to eat. Here’s an example of how to order your food in Spanish.

Example: Yo tomaré las costillas de cerdo con ensalada.
Translation: “I will have the pork ribs with salad.”

6- ¡Camarero/camarera!

If you need to call the waiter for any reason, unless you know his or her name, you’ll have to say “Waiter!” or “Waitress!” This is one of the many reasons why you should know how to say it in Spanish. If your server is a girl, you’ll have to say ¡camarera!, and if it’s a man, you’ll say ¡camarero! If you feel like that’s a bit too rude for you, you can also say Perdona, which means “Excuse me.” Here’s an example that we hope you won’t need:

Example: ¡Camarero! ¡Hay un pelo en mi sopa!
Translation: “Waiter! There’s a hair in my soup!”

7- ¿Algo más?

This question means, “Anything else?” and might be asked after you’ve ordered your food and the waiter wants to make sure that you’ve finished.

The answer to this question, if you have in fact finished ordering, could be No, eso es todo, which means “No, that is all.” If you still want to order something else, you can of course say , followed by your next order.

8- Tengo alergia a…

For people with allergies, it’s important to be able to let the waiter know about it. The way to say, “I’m allergic to…” is Tengo alergia a

Example: Tengo alergia a los cacahuetes.
Translation: “I’m allergic to peanuts.”

You might also want to ask if a specific dish contains an ingredient in particular.

Example: Perdona, ¿la crema de calabaza lleva lactosa?
Translation: “Excuse me, does the pumpkin soup contain lactose?”

To be even safer, you can check Spanish Materials and Resources from Food Allergy Research & Education for some help.

9- La cuenta, ¿por favor?

The last sentence on this list is what you might need to say last, before you leave. As you might have guessed, this is how to ask for the bill. This sentence means “The bill, please?” and even though you could ask using a full sentence instead, this is all you’ll need.


6. Nine Sentences to Ask for and Give Directions

We’re sure you knew this section would come. After all, learning directions are some of the most essential travel phrases in learning Spanish and we don’t want you to get lost when you visit our beautiful country. But if you do, we want to help you find your way.

Here are some sentences you might need if you’re lost or can’t find your destination. Because these sentences have quite simple meanings, we don’t think you’re going to need anything but their translations.

People

1- Estoy perdido.

Translation: “I’m lost.”

2- ¿Dónde está la estación?

Translation: “Where is the station?”

3- ¿Cómo se va a la Plaza Mayor?

Translation: “How can I get to the Main Square?”

4- ¿Dónde está el baño?

Translation: “Where is the bathroom?”

5- Está aquí mismo

Translation: “It’s right here.”

6- Está detrás de este edificio

Translation: “It’s behind this building.”

7- Ve/gira hacia la derecha

Translation: “Go/turn to the right.”

8- Ve/gira hacia la izquierda

Translation: “Go/turn to the left.”

9- Ve recto

Translation: “Go straight.”


7. Six Expressions You Might Need in Case of an Emergency

We really hope you never need to use any of these expressions, but they’re important and need to be included in this article. Just in case, here are some emergency expressions.

1- ¡Ayuda!

Translation: “Help!”

2- ¡Necesito ayuda!

Translation: “I need help!”

3- Llama a una ambulancia.

Translation: “Call an ambulance.”

4- ¿Hay algún médico?

Translation: “Is there any doctor?”

5- Llama al 112 (cien doce)

Translation: “Call 112 [the emergency number].”

6- He perdido la cartera/pasaporte.

Translation: “I’ve lost my wallet/passport.”


8. Five Flattery Phrases

Whenever you travel to a different country, locals love hearing that you’re having a good time on your trip and that you’re enjoying the country. If you want to criticize something, be careful and gentle, because as they say, you can criticize your own country as much as you want, but if a foreigner does it, they’re wrong. So if anyone asks you, try to focus on the positive side!

Here’s a few basic phrases you could use to express what you like about your trip, as well as a couple more you might need when you meet a local.

1- Me gustan los españoles.

Translation: “I like Spaniards.”

2- Me gusta la comida española.

Translation: “I like Spanish food.”

3- Me encanta España.

Translation: “I love Spain.”

4- Muy amable, gracias.

Translation: “Very kind, thank you.”

5- ¿Tienes Facebook o Instagram?

Translation: “Do you have Facebook or Instagram?”


9. Ten Useful Phrases to Go through Language Problems

World Map

Some of the most important Spanish travel phrases may be those that will help you overcome language barriers. So we want to have you covered in case you have trouble understanding someone or don’t feel too confident speaking Spanish. Just calm down and remember that you’re still learning and that we’re here to help you. The next few expressions are some of the most useful Spanish words for tourists, so pay attention.

1- ¿Hablas inglés?

Translation: “Do you speak English?”

2- No te entiendo.

Translation: “I can’t understand you.”

Girl

3- No lo sé.

Translation: “I don’t know.”

4- ¿Me lo puedes repetir?

Translation: “Could you repeat that?”

5- ¿Puedes hablar más despacio?

Translation: “Could you speak slower?”

6- No hablo español.

Translation: “I don’t speak Spanish.”

7- ¿Cómo se dice esto en español?

Translation: “How do you say this in Spanish?”

8- ¿Cómo se pronuncia esta palabra?

Translation: “How do you pronounce this word?”

9- Escríbelo, por favor.

Translation: “Write it down, please.”

10- ¿Lo puedes deletrear?

Translation: “Could you spell it?”


10. How SpanishPod101.com Can Help You Learn Spanish

Now that we’ve reached the end, we realize you’re probably thinking that these are too many expressions for you to learn straight away. We’re afraid you’re going to have to do some studying, but hey, we promise it’s going to be totally worth it! When you start learning a language, there’s nothing like the feeling of starting to understand and being understood. And we’re sure you see now that the travel phrases in Spanish language learning are so useful!

At SpanishPod101.com, there’s so much more you can learn, no matter what your level is. And now, with our guide of Spanish phrases for travelers and our Don’t Travel Without Knowing These Top 10 Verbs list, you can go anywhere in Spain. Be sure to check out all of our resources, so that you can master the language and culture while having fun!

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How to Use Numbers in Spanish

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Surely you already know how to say a few numbers in Spanish, but have you mastered them? And no, we’re not asking you if you have a PhD in Mathematics.

We’ll probably agree that numbers are an incredibly important part of our lives. Most of us don’t need to do any complicated math on a regular basis, unless that happens to be part of your job description. But we all still use numbers all the time, whether you like them or not. We all look at the clock a few times a day, we go shopping and look at the prices of products…

We all need to count things sometimes as well. We can count our money, or how many cartons of milk we have left, or how many steps there are from the entrance of your house to your room, or maybe how many days there are left until a special occasion.

We don’t need to be experts, but we all need numbers and we all use them. We realize they’re not the most exciting topic when learning a language, but if we all use them when we speak our native language, what makes you think you won’t need them in Spanish?

Curled

In today’s article, we’re going to teach you everything you need to know about using numbers in Spanish, including how to count, write, and pronounce Spanish numbers from 1 to 100 and higher!

Table of Contents

  1. Saying Numbers
  2. Giving Your Phone Number
  3. Saying Prices and Shopping
  4. Telling the Time
  5. Saying Dates
  6. Basic Math
  7. How SpanishPod101.com Can Help You Learn More Spanish

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1. Saying Numbers

Spanish Numbers

  • Numbers 0-9

Let’s start with the basics. Normally one of the first things you learn in Spanish is how to count from 0 to 10, so you might already know this, but we’ll show it here just in case. (They are, after all, some of the most important numbers in learning Spanish!)

  • 0 - cero
  • 1 - uno (or un if it’s in front of a noun, because it becomes an article, for example: un perro → “a dog” )
  • 2 - dos
  • 3 - tres
  • 4 - cuatro
  • 5 - cinco
  • 6 - seis
  • 7 - siete
  • 8 - ocho
  • 9 - nueve

Little Girl Counting with Her Fingers

  • Numbers 10-99

It’s time to start learning some more numbers. Just so you know, once we reach number 16, numbers start following a clear pattern, even though it might seem confusing at first. This is why first we’ll begin by explaining the hardest one, and then we promise the next numbers will be incredibly easy to understand.

Dieciséis (16) is nothing more than diez y seis (“ten and six”) put together. You might notice it’s not written exactly the same way, but that happens for a reason. Let’s analyze these changes step by step:

  1. Z → C: The first change is the z we had in the word diez that turns into a c in dieciséis, as well as in the words for the following numbers (diecisiete, dieciocho…). Don’t let this confuse you, you’re better than that. In Spanish, the letter c in front of the vowels e and i has the exact same sound as z (which is like the “th” sound in “thanks”), while every other time it would have a k sound.

    Moreover, for other reasons, we don’t use the letter z in front of those two vowels. In this case, what’s the letter that’s after c? That’s right, an i, which means it has the exact same sound as in diez.

  2. Y → I: The second change is another letter changing and it’s very similar to the previous one. In Spanish, the word for “and” is y, so if we wanted to put these words together, it would look like this: diecyséis.

    The combination of the letters c + y is extremely uncommon in Spanish, and in fact, it only exists in a few foreign words such as cyan. That’s why, to make it look more aesthetic, it changes to i.

  3. E → É: And finally, the last change, is one that we’ll only see in a couple more numbers. The reason for this change is based on the rules of Spanish accents. We won’t get too much into it right now, but basically, one of these rules is that words that end in vowel + s, like this one, that are stressed on the last syllable, always have an accent.

    Seis is a short word and only has one syllable, so it doesn’t require one. However, dieciséis is a longer word, so it does need one. Don’t worry too much about it for now; we promise it’s not as hard as it sounds, but now is not the time.

    We said this change happens in two more numbers: these are veintitrés (23) and veintiséis (26). It’s for the exact same reason.

Now that we’ve seen the hardest one, let’s look at the rest of the numbers higher than 16. Do you notice that it’s always ten, or twenty, or thirty, followed by y and another number? This is the pattern we were talking about. With tens and twenties, these words are written together like we saw previously and might show a few changes, but once we reach the thirties, they start being written separately, so it becomes a lot clearer.

  • 10 - diez
  • 11 - once
  • 12 - doce
  • 13 - trece
  • 14 - catorce
  • 15 - quince
  • 16 - dieciséis
  • 17 - diecisiete
  • 18 - dieciocho
  • 19 - diecinueve
  • 20 - veinte
  • 21 - veintiuno
  • 22 - veintidós
  • 23 - veintitrés
  • 24 - veinticuatro
  • 25 - veinticinco
  • 26 - veintiséis
  • 30 - treinta
  • 31 - treinta y uno
  • 32 - treinta y dos
  • 33 - treinta y tres
  • 40 - cuarenta
  • 41 - cuarenta y uno
  • 42 - cuarenta y dos
  • 50 - cincuenta
  • 60 - sesenta
  • 70 - setenta
  • 80 - ochenta
  • 90 - noventa

  • Numbers up to 1000

There are a few things you need to be careful with:

  1. Notice that 100 is cien, but in every other number that follows it changes to ciento and it’s followed by the next number. For example, 101 is ciento uno and 187 would be ciento ochenta y siete.
  2. Unlike in English, hundreds are written in one word. For example, doscientos (one word) = “two hundred” (two words). However, what follows it does work like in English: a space, and then the next number, in the same way it would normally be written. For example, “eight hundred forty-two” would be ochocientos cuarenta y dos in Spanish.
  3. In English, the word “hundred” doesn’t change, whether it’s one-hundred, two-hundred, or four-hundred. This does change a little bit in Spanish: if it’s, for example, 156, we’ll say ciento cincuenta y seis, but if it’s 470, we’ll say cuatrocientos setenta. Do you see what we’re talking about? Instead of ciento, when it’s more than one hundred, we add the letter s at the end to make it plural, so it will be cientos.
  4. Sometimes, the number in front of cientos will be the exact same word we learned in the beginning, such as cuatrocientos (400) or ochocientos (800), but there are others that are a bit irregular. These are setecientos (700) and novecientos (900), that don’t exactly use the words siete (7) and nueve (9). The most different one is quinientos (500), which sounds completely different than cinco (5) and doesn’t even end with cientos. It’s a special one, sorry about that.
  5. The words for hundreds can be masculine or feminine, depending on the noun they’re modifying. For example, if we’re talking about 300 T-shirts, because that’s a feminine word in Spanish, we would say trescientas camisetas, but if we’re talking about 300 dishes, we’ll say trescientos platos. If you’re just counting, because the number isn’t related to any noun, you don’t need to worry about its gender.

Now that we know all this, let’s take a look at the list:

  • 100 - cien
  • 101 - ciento uno
  • 102 - ciento dos
  • 103 - ciento tres
  • 110 - ciento diez
  • 111 - ciento once
  • 135 - ciento treinta y cinco
  • 200 - doscientos
  • 201 - doscientos uno
  • 202 - doscientos dos
  • 300 - trescientos
  • 400 - cuatrocientos
  • 500 - quinientos
  • 600 - seiscientos
  • 700 - setecientos
  • 800 - ochocientos
  • 900 - novecientos
  • 1,000 - mil

  • Thousands and millions

Did you think learning numbers up to 1,000 wasn’t enough? We got you covered. If, on the other hand, you think this is too much for you, don’t worry. Come back when you’re ready.

However, thousands and millions happen to be easier than hundreds, because in this case they do work exactly like in English: number + mil (“thousand”) or millón (“million”).

There’s only one thing you need to keep in mind for now: In Spanish, big numbers are broken up with dots, instead of commas. In the list of numbers below we’ll use the English standard so there’s no confusion, but for example, 2,345,392,203 in Spanish would be written 2.345.392.203.

  • 2,000 - dos mil
  • 2,001 - dos mil uno
  • 2,018 - dos mil dieciocho
  • 2,245 - dos mil doscientos cuarenta y cinco
  • 3,000 - tres mil
  • 10,000 - diez mil
  • 20,000 - veinte mil
  • 44,100 - cuarenta y cuatro mil cien
  • 1,000,000 - un millón (Note that here we do need the word un in front of millón)
  • 2,000,000 - dos millones
  • 4,023,150 - cuatro millones veintitrés mil ciento cincuenta

We could keep going, but we won’t, because we need to tell you something more important. We apologize in advance, because this might be confusing, but unfortunately, an American “one billion” isn’t equivalent to a Spanish un billón. Yes, we mean exactly what you just read. Let’s be a little bit more specific:

  • 1,000,000,000 = mil millones or un millardo = “one billion”
  • 1,000,000,000,000 = un billón = “one trillion”

We’re sure you’re already hoping you never have to refer to these numbers in Spanish, but here’s a specific example: in English, you would say that in the world there are over 7-billion people. However, in Spanish, you would have to say there are over siete mil millones.

  • Ordinal Numbers

When it comes to ordinal numbers, writing abbreviations is really easy, because they don’t change from number to number like they do in English. All you need to do is write whatever number you need followed by o if it refers to something or someone masculine, or a if it has a feminine reference.

For example, in an address, if you want to express that you live on the third floor, in the second apartment, you would need to write: 3o 2a. The first one refers to el piso (“floor”) and the second one to la casa (“house,” but it refers to the apartment).

  • 1st - primero / primera
  • 2nd - segundo / segunda
  • 3rd - tercero / tercera
  • 4th - cuarto / cuarta
  • 5th - quinto / quinta
  • 6th - sexto / sexto
  • 7th - séptimo / séptima
  • 8th - octavo / octava
  • 9th - noveno / novena
  • 10th - décimo / décima

Following the previous example, 3o 2a would be spelled tercero segunda.


2. Giving Your Phone Number

When giving a phone number in Spanish, there are a few different ways you can express these numbers. This shouldn’t come as a surprise, because we’re sure it happens in most languages. You can say them number by number, or two numbers at a time, or three. Because we’re only getting started here, we recommend saying it number by number.

Example:
A: ¿Me puedes dar tu número de teléfono?
B: Claro. Mi número es 612 934 213 (seis uno dos, nueve tres cuatro, dos uno tres).

Translation:
A: “Could you give me your phone number?”
B: “Of course. My number is 612 934 213.”


3. Saying Prices and Shopping

Japanese

In Spanish, decimal numbers are expressed with a comma instead of a dot, so we wouldn’t write or pronounce 2.7 (two point seven), but 2,7 (dos coma siete: “two comma seven”). In prices, even though we write it, we generally don’t pronounce the word coma.

When shopping in Spain, remember that our currency is euros, like in most European countries. You might notice in the following examples that we always place the € symbol after the number. In the examples below we’ve also expressed two different ways of saying numbers in prices, and they are both equally correct.

Between euros and cents it’s optional to say con, which means “with.” To give you a literal translation in English, it would be, for example, “two euros with fifty [cents]).” Moreover, you have the option of indicating the name of the currency, which in this case is euros, or just ignoring it.

The same thing goes for the word for “cents,” which is céntimos. Pay attention to the examples. In bold, we’ve marked all the optional words.

Example:
A: Disculpa, ¿cuánto cuesta esta libreta?
B: Cuesta 1,50 € (uno [con] cincuenta or un euro [con] cincuenta [céntimos]).

Translation:
A: “Excuse me, how much does this notebook cost?”
B: “It costs €1.50.”

Example:
A: ¿Cuánto es?
B: Son 56,78 € (cincuenta y seis [con] setenta y ocho or cincuenta y seis euros [con] setenta y ocho [céntimos]).

Translation:
A: “How much is it?”
B: “It’s €56.78.”


4. Telling the Time

There are a few noticeable differences between telling the time in Spanish and in English. For example, you’ll probably find that in the following list, all phrases begin with la or las. In case you don’t know that yet, la is an article that means “the.” To be a little more specific, it’s a feminine article. It’s not that time is feminine or anything, even though the word hora, which means “time,” is feminine, but when we need to say what time it is in Spanish, we’ll always use a feminine article.

Because Spanish is a pro-drop language (which means we tend to not use the subject when speaking), we don’t need to start the sentence with a pronoun like in English (“It’s half past five”). We can start with the verb ser in its right conjugation (don’t be scared, it’s actually easy) or directly with the article we just mentioned, followed by the time.

1:00 → La una [en punto]
One o’clock
2:00 → Las dos [en punto]
Two o’clock
10:05 → Las diez y cinco
Five past ten
2:10 → Las dos y diez
Ten past two
7:15 → Las siete y cuarto
Quarter past seven
4:30 → Las cuatro y media
Half past four
7:45 → Las ocho menos cuarto
Quarter to eight
11:53 → Las doce menos siete
Seven to twelve
2:55 → Las tres menos cinco
Five to three

Man Pointing at Watch

Example:
A: ¿Qué hora es?
B: (Son) las dos menos cuarto.

Translation:
A: “What time is it?”
B: “It’s a quarter to two.”

If you want to learn more about telling the time, check out our How to Tell Time in Spanish video lesson.


5. Saying Dates

Notice that in Spanish, just like in most languages (and unlike in American English), we express first the day and then the month. Another difference is that we don’t normally use ordinal numbers, even though it’s still an option; if we want to refer to April 3, we will say tres de abril instead of tercero de abril.

As you might have already realized and as we’ll see in the following examples, months and days of the week in Spanish aren’t spelled in capital letters like they are in English. If you don’t know months in Spanish yet, you can find them in our vocabulary list Talking about Months in Spanish, and for other vocabulary related to the days of the week, Talking about Days.

Example:
A: ¿Qué día es hoy?
B: (Es) miércoles dos de mayo.

Translation:
A: “What day is it today?”
B: “It’s Wednesday, May the 2nd.”

Example:
A: ¿Cuándo es tu cumpleaños?
B: (Es) el dieciséis de noviembre.

Translation:
A: “When is your birthday?”
B: “It’s on November the 16th.”


6. Basic Math

Luckily, these things don’t change from language to language. Could you imagine if sums were different in other languages? That would be chaos. The only thing that changes is the way we express them, both the calculation and the result.

Student Struggling with Math

1- Sumas

Example:
2 + 3 = 5
Dos más tres son cinco
“Two plus three is five”

Translation:
Dos más tres es igual a cinco
“Two plus three is equal to five”

2- Restas

Example:
10 - 4 = 6
Diez menos cuatro son seis
“Ten minus four is six”

Translation:
Diez menos cuatro es igual a seis
“Ten minus four is equal to six”

If you happen to be a big Math fan and you’re interested in learning some more Math in Spanish, check out our Top 10 Must Know Math Words in Spanish video lesson.


7. How SpanishPod101.com Can Help You Learn More Spanish

In your language-learning, Spanish numbers are one of the most important topics you’ll need to learn and memorize. Aside from counting and other uses we mentioned above, you can even use Spanish numbers to learn Spanish pronunciation.

Now that you know all numbers in Spanish and how to use them in the most common situations, you’re not going to stop there, right? There’s so much more you can learn at SpanishPod101.com, if you give us a chance. Check out our lessons, podcasts, articles, and vocabulary lists to learn everything you need and more to become fluent in Spanish, the second-most natively spoken language, after Chinese.

If you’re interested in learning even more numbers, check out our list of Spanish Numbers. Numbers are the same in Spain and Mexico and only show differences in pronunciation, so feel free to take a look at that list even if you’re learning Spanish from Spain.

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How To Post In Perfect Spanish on Social Media

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You’re learning to speak Spanish, and it’s going well. Your confidence is growing! So much so that you feel ready to share your experiences on social media—in Spanish.

At Learn Spanish, we make this easy for you to get it right the first time. Post like a boss with these phrases and guidelines, and get to practice your Spanish in the process.

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1. Talking about Your Restaurant Visit in Mexican Spanish

Eating out is fun, and often an experience you’d like to share. Take a pic, and start a conversation on social media in Spanish. Your friend will be amazed by your language skills…and perhaps your taste in restaurants!

Antonio eats at a restaurant with his friends, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

POST

Let’s break down Antonio’s post.

Probando el restaurante italiano nuevo.
“Trying out the new Italian restaurant.”

1- Probando

First is an expression meaning “Trying out.”
This word in the gerund form is useful for short posts, because it doesn’t have to be conjugated. It can also be used when talking about trying out things such as electronic devices and cars.

2- el restaurante italiano nuevo.

Then comes the phrase - “the new Italian restaurant.”
In Spanish, most of the time, adjectives go after the noun. Italian restaurants are very popular in Mexico, especially if you are craving good pizza.

COMMENTS

In response, Antonio’s friends leave some comments.

1- ¡Me hubieras llevado!

His girlfriend, Cristina, uses an expression meaning - “You should have taken me!”
Cristina expresses here that she wishes she was with her boyfriend rather.

2- Se oye caro.

His college friend, Javier, uses an expression meaning - “Sounds expensive.”
Javier has reservations about the costliness of the food.

3- ¡Disfruta mucho!

His neighbor, Angelica, uses an expression meaning - “Enjoy (a lot)!”
Angelica simply wishes him a good time.

4- Estoy segura que les va a encantar.

His high school friend, Karen, uses an expression meaning - “I’m sure you guys will love it.”
Karen is also optimistic that this is an enjoyable event.

VOCABULARY

Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • restaurante: “restaurant”
  • probando: “testing, trying out”
  • nuevo, nueva: “new”
  • mucho: “a lot”
  • les va a encantar: “you / they are going to love it “
  • hubieras: “you should have”
  • caro, cara: “expensive “
  • So, let’s practice a bit. If a friend posted something about having dinner with friends, which phrase would you use?

    Now go visit a Spanish restaurant, and wow the staff with your language skills!

    2. Post about Your Mall Visit in Mexican Spanish

    Another super topic for social media is shopping—everybody does it, most everybody loves it, and your friends on social media are probably curious about your shopping sprees! Share these Spanish phrases in posts when you visit a mall.

    Cristina shop with her sister at the mall, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Cristina’s post.

    Para las compras mi hermana es la mejor.
    “Going shopping with my sister is the best.”

    1- Para las compras

    First is an expression meaning “For shopping.”
    This phrase in English is a verb, but in Spanish it is a plural noun.

    2- mi hermana es la mejor

    Then comes the phrase - “my sister is the best.”
    You can substitute the word for sister with any other feminine noun.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Cristina’s friends leave some comments.

    1- ¡No, yo soy la mejor!

    Her high school friend, Teresa, uses an expression meaning - “No, I’m the best!”
    Teresa is playfully commenting, joking with her friend.

    2- Momento familiar.

    Her neighbor, Angelica, uses an expression meaning - “Family moment. ”
    Angelica states the obvious - this is a warmhearted family thing.

    3- ¡No te gastes todo tu salario!

    Her college friend, Javier, uses an expression meaning - “Don’t spend all your salary!”
    Javier playfully admonishes her not to overspend.

    4- ¡Yo quiero ir!

    Her boyfriend’s high school friend, Karen, uses an expression meaning - “I want to go!”
    Karen takes part in the conversation by injecting this wish.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • compras: “shopping”
  • hermana: “sister”
  • mejor: “best”
  • salario: “salary”
  • momento familiar: “family time”
  • no te gastes: “do not spend”
  • quiero: “I want”
  • So, if a friend posted something about going shopping, which phrase would you use?

    3. Talking about a Sport Day in Mexican Spanish

    Sports events, whether you’re the spectator or the sports person, offer fantastic opportunity for great social media posts. Learn some handy phrases and vocabulary to start a sport-on-the-beach conversation in Spanish.

    Antonio plays with his friends at the beach, posts an image of the team playing, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Antonio’s post.

    ¡El equipo está listo para la victoria en la playa!
    “The team is ready for victory on the beach!”

    1- El equipo está listo

    First is an expression meaning “The team is ready.”
    Post this in Spanish to mean that you are ready to do something or ready for something. For example, a competition or a meal. It can also mean that you are looking forward to it.

    2- para la victoria en la playa

    Then comes the phrase - “for victory on the beach.”
    Mexican beaches are famous tourist attractions because they’re beautiful and fun, which makes it an ideal place to have a sports match.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Antonio’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Mucha suerte.

    His supervisor, Pablo, uses an expression meaning - “Good luck”
    This is a traditional, commonly-used reaction to a comment such as Antonio’s.

    2- ¡Han entrenado duro!

    His girlfriend, Cristina, uses an expression meaning - “You’ve trained hard!”
    Cristina is sincere in her wish to encourage and support her boyfriend, and it shows with this comment!

    3- Ojalá y no les llueva.

    His girlfriend’s nephew, Paco, uses an expression meaning - “Hopefully it won’t rain.”
    Paco is adding a less positive, but still realistic comment. Hopefully he’s not that cynical…

    4- ¡Claro que estamos listos!

    His college friend, Javier, uses an expression meaning - “Of course we’re ready!”
    Javier is positive and optimistic that the game will go their way!

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • equipo: “team”
  • listo: “ready”
  • playa: “beach”
  • victoria: “victory”
  • suerte: “luck”
  • claro: “of course”
  • ojalá: “hopefully”
  • Which phrase would you use if a friend posted something about sports?

    But sport is not the only thing you can play! Play some music, and share it on social media.

    4. Share a Song on Social Media in Mexican Spanish

    Music is the language of the soul, they say. So, don’t hold back—share what touches your soul with your friends!

    Cristina shares a song she just heard at a party, posts an image of the artist, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Cristina’s post.

    Para alegrarles el día, escuchen esta canción.
    “To brighten your day, listen to this song.”

    1- Para alegrarles el día,

    First is an expression meaning “To brighten your day,.”
    This phrase is used a lot on social media to share something you think people would like.

    2- escuchen esta canción

    Then comes the phrase - “listen to this song.”
    You can use this phrase to recommend a song.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Cristina’s friends leave some comments.

    1- ¡Gracias!

    Her neighbor, Angelica, uses an expression meaning - “Thank you!”
    Angelica is grateful, and says so in this short and sweet post!

    2- Que moderna salió, tía.

    Her nephew, Paco, uses an expression meaning - “You turned out to be a modern woman, aunt. ”
    Paco gives his aunt a compliment, meaning he probably likes the song!

    3- ¡Ah, de la fiesta!

    Her boyfriend’s high school friend, Karen, uses an expression meaning - “Ah, from the party!”
    Karen remembers this song from somewhere.

    4- Que extraña música.

    Her supervisor, Pablo, uses an expression meaning - “That’s strange music.”
    Pablo is perhaps a bit old-fashioned, but his opinion is keeping the conversation going.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • canción: “song”
  • alegrar: “to lighten up”
  • moderna: “modern”
  • tía: “tía”
  • fiesta: “party”
  • extraño, extraña: “strange”
  • música: “music”
  • Which song would you share? And what would you say to a friend who posted something about sharing music or videos?

    Now you know how to start a conversation about a song or a video on social media!

    5. Mexican Spanish Social Media Comments about a Concert

    Still on the theme of music—visiting live concerts and shows just have to be shared with your friends. Here are some handy phrases and vocab to wow your followers in Spanish!

    Antonio goes to a concert, posts an image of the band, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Antonio’s post.

    ¡La banda se oye mejor en vivo, inolvidable!
    “The band sounds better live. Unforgettable!”

    1- La banda se oye mejor en vivo

    First is an expression meaning “The band sounds better live.”
    You can change the noun to express that something is best experienced in person.

    2- inolvidable

    Then comes the phrase - “unforgettable.”
    This is mainly used to express that something is really good, but it can also be used to express that something is very bad.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Antonio’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Ya está muy viejo para esos conciertos.

    His girlfriend’s nephew, Paco, uses an expression meaning - “You’re too old for those concerts.”
    It seems the band is more popular with young people - or people younger than Antonio! Paco can be a bit negative with this comment.

    2- ¡Vas a ser el más viejo ahí!

    His girlfriend’s high school friend, Teresa, uses an expression meaning - “You’ll be the oldest one there!”
    Teresa agrees with Paco, though, so who knows? Is Antonio too old to attend these concerts, or are these two just making conversation?

    3- ¡No hagas caso, vamos a disfrutar!

    His college friend, Javier, uses an expression meaning - “Don’t listen. Let’s enjoy!”
    Javier clearly feel that Teresa and Paco’s opinions don’t really matter in this instance, and recommends that they just enjoy the show. Good advice!

    4- Una de las mejores bandas.

    His high school friend, Karen, uses an expression meaning - “One of the best bands.”
    Karen feels optimistic about the quality of the band.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • banda: “band”
  • inolvidable: “unforgettable”
  • concierto: “concert”
  • disfrutar: “to enjoy”
  • una de las mejores: “one of the best”
  • se oye mejor: “it sounds better”
  • en vivo: “live”
  • If a friend posted something about a concert, which phrase would you use?

    6. Talking about an Unfortunate Accident in Mexican Spanish

    Oh dear. You broke something by accident. Use these Spanish phrases to start a thread on social media. Or maybe just to let your friends know why you are not contacting them!

    Cristina accidentally breaks her mobile phone, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Cristina’s post.

    Qué lástima, mi celular ha muerto.
    “What a shame. My cellphone (has) died.”

    1- Qué lástima

    First is an expression meaning “What a pity”
    A phrase used to express that something unfortunate has happened.

    2- mi celular ha muerto

    Then comes the phrase - “my cellphone has died.”
    A phrase used to express that the “cellphone” isn’t working anymore. If ‘cellphone’ was changed to another object, it would also mean that that object no longer works.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Cristina’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Nunca te duran.

    Her nephew, Paco, uses an expression meaning - “You never make them last. ”
    Paco is being negative in his reaction with this criticism, or perhaps this is just the way he and his aunt banter with one another?

    2- Ya tienes excusa para comprar el más nuevo.

    Her high school friend, Teresa, uses an expression meaning - “Now you have an excuse to buy the newest one.”
    Teresa offers Cristina a positive out - the phone can be replaced with a better one.

    3- ¡Espero que no haya sido a propósito!

    Her boyfriend, Antonio, uses an expression meaning - “I hope it wasn’t on purpose!”
    Antonio seems to comment in response to Teresa’s post! He seems to be making conversation.

    4- Se puede arreglar.

    Her supervisor, Pablo, uses an expression meaning - “It can be fixed.”
    Pablo has sober advice.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • qué lástima: “what a pity, what a shame”
  • celular: “cellphone”
  • nunca: “never”
  • excusa: “excuse”
  • comprar: “to buy”
  • arreglar: “to fix”
  • a propósito: “on purpose”
  • If a friend posted something about having broken something by accident, which phrase would you use?

    So, now you know how to discuss an accident in Spanish. Well done!

    7. Chat about Your Boredom on Social Media in Mexican Spanish

    Sometimes, we’re just bored with how life goes. And to alleviate the boredom, we write about it on social media. Add some excitement to your posts by addressing your friends and followers in Spanish!

    Antonio gets bored at home, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Antonio’s post.

    Estoy aburrido, ¿qué recomiendan?
    “I’m bored, what do you recommend (to do)?”

    1- Estoy aburrido

    First is an expression meaning “I’m bored.”
    This is commonly used on social media to invite people to start an activity.

    2- ¿qué recomiendan?

    Then comes the phrase - “what do you recommend?.”
    This question can be asked for opinions, not only about activities, but of other things such as food and movies.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Antonio’s friends leave some comments.

    1- ¡Ven y nos aburrimos juntos!

    His girlfriend, Cristina, uses an expression meaning - “Come and let’s be bored together!”
    Cristina is being a good girlfriend and has sympathy with his feelings. She offers a good solution!

    2- Ponte a limpiar la casa.

    His college friend, Javier, uses an expression meaning - “Get (on) to cleaning the house.”
    Javier is a clown and suggests that Antonio engages in housecleaning. He really must be joking…

    3- Podrías venir a trabajar extra…

    His supervisor, Pablo, uses an expression meaning - “You could come work overtime…”
    Pablo has a sober solution, but one that Antonio is unlikely to take, right?

    4- ¡Yo tampoco quiero estar aburrida!

    His girlfriend’s high school friend, Teresa, uses an expression meaning - “I don’t want to be bored either!”
    Teresa shares a personal experience, a good way to participate in a conversation.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • aburrido, aburrida: “bored”
  • qué: “what”
  • casa: “house”
  • venir: “to come”
  • limpiar: “to clean”
  • recomendar: “to recommend”
  • trabajar extra: “to work overtime”
  • If a friend posted something about being bored, which phrase would you use?

    Still bored? Share another feeling and see if you can start a conversation!

    8. Exhausted? Share It on Social Media in Mexican Spanish

    Sitting in public transport after work, feeling like chatting online? Well, converse in Spanish about how you feel, and let your friends join in!

    Cristina feels exhausted after a long day at work, posts an image of herself looking tired, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Cristina’s post.

    ¡Por fin puedo ir a descansar a mi casa!
    “Finally, I can go rest at home!”

    1- Por fin

    First is an expression meaning “At last.”
    This phrase is used to express relief over something that is finally done or finished.

    2- puedo ir a descansar a mi casa

    Then comes the phrase - “I can go rest at home.”
    Use this pattern when you are allowing yourself to do something.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Cristina’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Te estaré esperando con la cena.

    Her boyfriend, Antonio, uses an expression meaning - “I’ll be waiting with dinner.”
    Antonio is being a boyfriend from heaven!

    2- ¡Qué tarde saliste del trabajo!

    Her neighbor, Angelica, uses an expression meaning - “You got out really late!”
    Angelica feels sorry for Cristina that she had to leave work so late.

    3- ¡Ya mero serás libre!

    Her high school friend, Teresa, uses an expression meaning - “You’re almost free!”
    There is a silver lining to this dark cloud! Teresa kindly reminds Cristina that the suffering is almost over.

    4- Todos tenemos que trabajar duro.

    Her college friend, Javier, uses an expression meaning - “We all have to work hard.”
    Javier reminds her that she’s not alone in her predicament.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • por fin: “at last, finally”
  • descansar: “to rest”
  • trabajo: “job, work”
  • ya mero: “almost”
  • libre: “free”
  • te estaré esperando: “I will be waiting for you”
  • tarde: “late”
  • If a friend posted something about being exhausted, which phrase would you use?

    Now you know how to say you’re exhausted in Spanish! Well done.

    9. Talking about an Injury in Mexican Spanish

    So life happens, and you manage to hurt yourself during a soccer game. Very Tweet-worthy! Here’s how to do it in Spanish.

    Antonio suffers a painful injury, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Antonio’s post.

    ¡El entrenamiento de fútbol me ha costado una pierna, literalmente!
    “Soccer training has cost me a leg, literally!”

    1- El entrenamiento de fútbol me ha costado una pierna

    First is an expression meaning “Soccer training has cost me a leg.”
    You can change the word leg for another noun in this phrase to express that something has cost you more than money.

    2- literalmente

    Then comes the phrase - “literally.”
    An adverb that means something is in a literal manner.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Antonio’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Ya no puede hacer ejercicios pesados.

    His girlfriend’s nephew, Paco, uses an expression meaning - “You can’t do heavy exercises.”
    Paco feels the need to remind Antonio of something he undoubtedly knows.

    2- ¿Qué pasó?

    His girlfriend’s high school friend, Teresa, uses an expression meaning - “What happened?”
    Teresa shows her concern by being interested in the news. She asks for more details.

    3- Estoy segura que no es tan grave.

    His high school friend, Karen, uses an expression meaning - “I’m sure it’s not too serious.”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling optimistic.

    4- Por eso se retiran jóvenes los futbolistas.

    His college friend, Javier, uses an expression meaning - “That’s why soccer players retire young.”
    Javier doesn’t feel positive about professional soccer players’ careers.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • entrenamiento: “training”
  • me ha costado: “It has cost me”
  • pierna: “leg”
  • grave: “serious”
  • ¿Qué pasó?: “What happened?”
  • joven: “young”
  • If a friend posted something about being injured, which phrase would you use?

    We love to share our fortunes and misfortunes; somehow that makes us feel connected to others.

    10. Starting a Conversation Feeling Disappointed in Mexican Spanish

    Sometimes things don’t go the way we planned. Share your disappointment about this with your friends!

    Cristina feels disappointed about today’s weather, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Cristina’s post.

    Yo que quería salir pero esta lluvia no se va a ir.
    “I wanted to go out, but this rain isn’t going to leave.”

    1- Yo que quería

    First is an expression meaning “I wanted.”
    This phrase is used to express that you wanted something or wanted to do something but there is a factor that is not letting you achieve it.

    2- salir pero esta lluvia no se va a ir

    Then comes the phrase - “to go out but this rain isn’t going to leave.”
    Place the reason why you couldn’t get or do something after ‘but’.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Cristina’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Pero si podemos hacer algo adentro.

    Her boyfriend, Antonio, uses an expression meaning - “But we can do something indoors.”
    Antonio is being supportive by suggesting that they turn the situation around. Good for him!

    2- Podemos ir al cine.

    Her boyfriend’s high school friend, Karen, uses an expression meaning - “We can go to the movies.”
    Karen is also offering a suggestion to alleviate Cristina’s problem.

    3- Ten mucho cuidado si vas a manejar.

    Her neighbor, Angelica, uses an expression meaning - “Be very careful if you’re going to drive.”
    Angelica is more concerned with Cristina’s safety on the wet roads.

    4- Nos arruinó el fin de semana.

    Her college friend, Javier, uses an expression meaning - “It ruined our weekend. ”
    Javier commiserates by sharing a personal experience. It also rained on his parade!

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • salir: “to get out, to go out”
  • lluvia: “rain”
  • adentro: “inside, indoors”
  • cine: “movies”
  • manejar: “to drive”
  • arruinar: “to ruin, to mess up”
  • fin de semana: “weekend”
  • How would you comment in Spanish when a friend is disappointed?

    Not all posts need to be about a negative feeling, though!

    11. Talking about Your Relationship Status in Mexican Spanish

    Don’t just change your relationship status in Settings, talk about it!

    Antonio changes his status to “In a relationship”, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Antonio’s post.

    ¡Mi vida ya no será igual con alguien especial a mi lado!
    “My life won’t be the same with someone special by my side!”

    1- Mi vida ya no será igual

    First is an expression meaning “My life will not be the same.”
    This phrase is used a lot to express that something has happened that will impact you greatly. It could be something with either a negative or positive impact.

    2- con alguien especial a mi lado

    Then comes the phrase - “with someone special by my side.”
    In Mexican culture, couples like to commemorate the day on which they began their relationships. They like to give each other presents when they celebrate each month’s anniversary.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Antonio’s friends leave some comments.

    1- ¿Quién es la suertuda?

    His high school friend, Karen, uses an expression meaning - “Who’s the lucky one?”
    Karen is teasing the couple by wondering who is lucky for having met who.

    2- ¡Ya era hora de que te calmaras!

    His girlfriend’s high school friend, Teresa, uses an expression meaning - “It’s about time you settled down!”
    Teresa feels the couple should be together, that’s clear!

    3- Milagro que alguien te va a aguantar.

    His college friend, Javier, uses an expression meaning - “It’s a miracle that someone would put up with you.”
    Javier makes fun of his friend, as guys often do with sensitive matters.

    4- Qué bueno que te da gusto.

    His girlfriend, Cristina, uses an expression meaning - “It’s a good thing you’re glad.”
    Cristina’s comment is rather humorous. Imagine Antonio was unhappy about having a new girlfriend!

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • vida: “life”
  • igual : “the same”
  • alguien: “someone, somebody”
  • especial: “special”
  • suertudo, suertuda: “lucky”
  • milagro: “miracle”
  • aguantar: “put up with”
  • What would you say in Spanish when a friend changes their relationship status?

    Being in a good relationship with someone special is good news - don’t be shy to spread it!

    12. Post about Getting Married in Mexican Spanish

    Wow, so things got serious, and you’re getting married. Congratulations! Or, your friend is getting married, so talk about this in Spanish.

    Cristina is getting married today, so she eaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Cristina’s post.

    ¡Hoy es el día más importante de mi vida, mi boda!
    “Today is the most important day of my life. My wedding!”

    1- Hoy es el día más importante de mi vida

    First is an expression meaning “Today is the most important day of my life.”
    A phrase commonly used to express that something important is going to happen on that day.

    2- mi boda

    Then comes the phrase - “my wedding.”
    Replace this phrase with any other event or feeling that is important to you at the moment.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Cristina’s friends leave some comments.

    1- ¡El día más importante para los dos!

    Her husband, Antonio, uses an expression meaning - “The most important day for both of us!”
    Antonio agrees with his wife-to-be - a very good thing! - and reminds her that this is a big day not only for her.

    2- Les deseo lo mejor en este día tan especial.

    Her neighbor, Angelica, uses an expression meaning - “I wish you all the best on this special day.”
    A warmhearted wish for the couple.

    3- ¡Estoy lista para la fiesta!

    Her high school friend, Teresa, uses an expression meaning - “I’m ready for the party!”
    Use this expression to be funny.

    4- Muchas felicidades, lo mejor aún está por venir.

    Her husband’s high school friend, Karen, uses an expression meaning - “Congratulations. The best has yet to come.”
    Karen is optimistic that this is a good union and congratulates the couple accordingly.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • día : “day”
  • importante: “important”
  • boda: “wedding”
  • listo, lista: “ready”
  • felicidades: “congratulations”
  • venir: “to come”
  • aún: “yet, still”
  • How would you respond in Spanish to a friend’s post about getting married?

    For the next topic, fast forward about a year into the future after the wedding…

    13. Announcing Big News in Mexican Spanish

    Wow, huge stuff is happening in your life! Announce it in Spanish.

    Antonio finds out he and his wife are going to have a baby, posts an image of them, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Antonio’s post.

    ¡Vamos a tener un bebé!
    “We are going to have a baby!”

    1- Vamos a

    First is an expression meaning “We are going to .”
    Although this expression has the plural form of the verb “to go” it can mean “we are going to”. A verb is added after to express what you are going to do as a group.

    2- tener un bebé

    Then comes the phrase - “have a baby.”
    You can also change the word for “baby” to another noun. For example, a test, a puppy, a fun day, etc.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Antonio’s friends leave some comments.

    1- ¡Qué alegría, muy buenas noticias!

    His neighbor, Angelica, uses an expression meaning - “What joy, this is very good news!”
    This is a spontaneous, warmhearted comment.

    2- ¡Yo quiero ser la tía preferida!

    His wife’s high school friend, Teresa, uses an expression meaning - “I want to be the favorite aunt!”
    Teresa is excited about the news, and hopes to have a big role in the little one’s life.

    3- ¡Felicidades! Han de estar muy emocionados.

    His high school friend, Karen, uses an expression meaning - “Congratulations! You two must be very excited.”
    Karen is also pleased about the news, imagining their joy too.

    4- Espero que no le pongan un nombre raro.

    His nephew, Paco, uses an expression meaning - “I hope you don’t give him/her a weird name.”
    Paco is probably joking with the expecting parents. Otherwise he’s a rather miserable little chap!

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • tener: “to have”
  • bebé: “baby”
  • alegría : “joy, happiness”
  • buenas noticias: “good news”
  • preferido, preferida: “favorite”
  • nombre: “name”
  • raro, rara: “weird”
  • Which phrase would you choose when a friend announces their pregnancy on social media?

    So, talking about a pregnancy will get you a lot of traction on social media. But wait till you see the responses to babies!

    14. Posting Mexican Spanish Comments about Your Baby

    Your bundle of joy is here, and you cannot keep quiet about it! Share your thoughts in Spanish.

    Cristina plays with her baby, posts an image of sweet little one, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Cristina’s post.

    Mi tesoro está muy contento con su mami.
    “My precious is very happy with his mommy.”

    1- Mi tesoro

    First is an expression meaning “My precious.”
    This phrase literally says “my treasure” but it is a common phrase of affection for someone. Similar to - my darling.

    2- está muy contento con su mami

    Then comes the phrase - “he/she is very happy with his/her mommy..”
    In Mexican culture it is common to have a first name and a middle name along with two family names. One is your father’s family name and the other is your mother’s family name.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Cristina’s friends leave some comments.

    1- ¡Cuando necesiten una niñera yo estoy disponible!

    Her neighbor, Angelica, uses an expression meaning - “When you need a nanny I’m available!”
    Angelica is helpful and really eager to be part of the kiddo’s life.

    2- ¡Qué hermoso!

    Her husband’s high school friend, Karen, uses an expression meaning - “So beautiful!”
    Karen adds a positive, appreciative comment.

    3- ¡Yo también quiero uno!

    Her high school friend, Teresa, uses an expression meaning - “I also want one!”
    Teresa is so inspired by the look of this baby that she wants one too.

    4- ¿A quién le toca cambiar el pañal?

    Her nephew, Paco, uses an expression meaning - “Whose turn is it to change the diaper?”
    Paco is probably teasing the couple with this comment.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • tesoro: “treasure”
  • contento, contenta: “happy”
  • niñera: “nanny, babysitter”
  • disponible: “available”
  • hermoso, hermosa: “beautiful”
  • cambiar: “change”
  • a quién le toca: “who’s turn is it”
  • If your friend is the mother or father, which phrase would you use on social media?

    Congratulations, you know the basics of chatting about a baby in Spanish! But we’re not done with families yet…

    15. Mexican Spanish Comments about a Family Reunion

    Family reunions - some you love, some you hate. Share about it on your feed.

    Antonio goes to a family gathering, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Antonio’s post.

    ¡La mejor carne asada se come en familia!
    “The best barbecue is eaten with family!”

    1- La mejor carne asada

    First is an expression meaning “The best barbecue.”
    Mexican “barbecue” is a very popular activity for families and friends, especially during summer. The participants contribute by bringing food or drinks, and everyone enjoys long talks during and after eating.

    2- se come en familia

    Then comes the phrase - “is eaten with family.”
    Mexican families tend to be very united, not only with close relatives and friends, but also with distant relatives. This is why reunions and events often have a large number of guests.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Antonio’s friends leave some comments.

    1- ¡Eso es verdad!

    His neighbor, Angelica, uses an expression meaning - “That’s true!”
    Angelica agrees with Antonio.

    2- Pensé que era la que sabe rica.

    His nephew, Paco, uses an expression meaning - “I thought it’s the one that tastes good.”
    Paco must be a clown…otherwise he’s a wise-nose and a know-it-all! He takes part in the conversation with wry, dry wit.

    3- ¡Yo soy casi de la familia, pero no me invitan!

    His wife’s high school friend, Teresa, uses an expression meaning - “I’m almost family, but you don’t invite me!”
    Teresa takes part in the conversation, probably with a light heart.

    4- Yo también quiero invitación para la próxima carne asada.

    His high school friend, Karen, uses an expression meaning - “I want an invitation for the next barbecue, too.”
    The friends all want in on this party!

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • carne asada: “barbecue”
  • familia: “family”
  • verdad: “_true”
  • invitar: “to invite”
  • invitación: “invitation”
  • próximo: próxima: “next”
  • también: “too, also”
  • Which phrase is your favorite to comment on a friend’s photo about a family reunion?

    16. Post about Your Travel Plans in Mexican Spanish

    So, the family are going on holiday. Do you know how to post and leave comments in Spanish about being at the airport, waiting for a flight?

    Cristina waits at the airport for her flight, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Cristina’s post.

    ¡Me choca cuando se atrasan los vuelos!
    “I hate it when flights are delayed!”

    1- Me choca cuando

    First is an expression meaning “I hate it when.”
    This is a very common phrase used in informal conversations. It literally means “It crashes to me when…”, and it is used when something bothers you, or when you hate something or someone.

    2- se atrasan los vuelos

    Then comes the phrase - “flights are delayed.”
    Mexico is among one of the countries with the most airports in the world. 58 of its airports are international airports.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Cristina’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Por favor avisa cuando vayas a abordar.

    Her neighbor, Angelica, uses an expression meaning - “Please let me know when you are going to board.”
    Angelica probably wants to be sure that Cristina is OK, therefore she asks to be kept up to date.

    2- ¡Mejor tarde que nunca!

    Her husband’s high school friend, Karen, uses an expression meaning - “Better late than never!”
    Karen points out a positive aspect to the situation.

    3- Voy a estar esperando mi recuerdo.

    Her nephew, Paco, uses an expression meaning - “I will be waiting for my souvenir.”
    Paco is dropping a hint here! He clearly expects to benefit from this holiday of his family’s.

    4- Ese aeropuerto es terrible, buena suerte.

    Her husband’s college friend, Javier, uses an expression meaning - “That airport is terrible. Good luck.”
    Javier empathises by agreeing with Cristina about the service at the airport.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • vuelo: “flight”
  • abordar: “to board”
  • tarde: “late”
  • nunca: “never”
  • aeropuerto: “airport”
  • recuerdo: “souvenir”
  • terrible: “terrible”
  • Choose and memorize your best airport phrase in Spanish!

    Hopefully the rest of the trip is better!

    17. Posting about an Interesting Find in Mexican Spanish

    So maybe you’re strolling around at a local market, and find something interesting. Here are some handy Spanish phrases!

    Antonio finds an unusual item at a local market, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Antonio’s post.

    No tengo ni idea qué es esto pero se ve interesante.
    “I have no idea what this is, but it looks interesting.”

    1- No tengo ni idea

    First is an expression meaning “I have no idea.”
    It literally translates to “I don’t have no idea”. This phrase has two negatives, but it is considered grammatically correct in the Spanish language.

    2- qué es esto pero se ve interesante

    Then comes the phrase - “what this is but it looks interesting.”
    The phrase “it looks interesting” in Spanish is used sometimes sarcastically. So pay attention to the speaker’s facial expression while they’re saying it.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Antonio’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Parece ser una antigüedad.

    His supervisor, Pablo, uses an expression meaning - “It seems to be an antique.”
    Pablo seems to know about these things, but he’s not sure.

    2- Se ve rara, con razón nadie la ha comprado.

    His college friend, Javier, uses an expression meaning - “It looks weird. No wonder nobody has bought it.”
    Javier doesn’t seem to think much of Antonio’s find.

    3- En ese mercado siempre hay cosas interesantes.

    His high school friend, Karen, uses an expression meaning - “There are always interesting things in that market.”
    Karen feels optimistic that the find is at least interesting.

    4- Tal vez tiene valor histórico.

    His wife, Cristina, uses an expression meaning - “Maybe it has historical value. ”
    Cristina wants to be positive about Antonio’s find.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • ni idea: “no idea”
  • antigüedad: “antiquity”
  • raro, rara: “weird”
  • mercado: “market”
  • siempre: “always”
  • cosa: “thing”
  • valor: “value”
  • Which phrase would you use to comment on a friend’s interesting find?

    Perhaps you will even learn the identity of your find! Or perhaps you’re on holiday, and visiting interesting places…

    18. Post about a Sightseeing Trip in Mexican Spanish

    Let your friends know what you’re up to in Spanish, especially when visiting a remarkable place! Don’t forget the photo.

    Cristina visits a famous landmark, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Cristina’s post.

    ¡Estoy tan agradecida de poder visitar este bello lugar!
    “I am so grateful to be able to visit this beautiful place!”

    1- Estoy tan agradecida

    First is an expression meaning “I am so grateful.”
    A common, formal phrase used to express gratitude for something or towards someone, or to express happiness over something, someone, or a situation.

    2- de poder visitar este bello lugar

    Then comes the phrase - “to be able to visit this beautiful place.”
    Just change this part of the expression to refer to the subject of your gratitude.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Cristina’s friends leave some comments.

    1- ¡Qué gran oportunidad!

    Her neighbor, Angelica, uses an expression meaning - “What a great opportunity!”
    Angelica basically agrees with Cristina about the experience.

    2- ¡No te vayas a quedar ahí para siempre!

    Her high school friend, Teresa, uses an expression meaning - “Don’t stay there forever!”
    Teresa is making a joke about Cristina’s love of the beautiful place.

    3- ¡Yo me uniré al siguiente viaje!

    Her husband’s high school friend, Karen, uses an expression meaning - “I will join you on your next trip!”
    Karen hopes to go there too.

    4- Ese es un monumento cultural muy importante.

    Her supervisor, Pablo, uses an expression meaning - “That is a very important cultural monument.”
    Pablo shares his knowledge of the landmark, and makes an interesting contribution to the conversation.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • agradecido, agradecida: “grateful”
  • visitar: “to visit”
  • bello lugar: “beautiful place”
  • para siempre: “forever”
  • me uniré: “I will join”
  • viaje: “trip”
  • monumento: “monument”
  • Which phrase would you prefer when a friend posts about a famous landmark?

    Share your special places with the world. Or simply post about your relaxing experiences.

    19. Post about Relaxing Somewhere in Mexican Spanish

    So you’re doing nothing yet you enjoy that too? Tell your social media friends about it in Spanish!

    Antonio relaxes at a beautiful place, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Antonio’s post.

    Me merecía un buen descanso en un paraíso.
    “I deserved a good rest in paradise.”

    1- Me merecía

    First is an expression meaning “I deserved.”
    The phrase is translated as “I deserve,” but it is interpreted as rightfully deserving of something. It is commonly used after receiving or experiencing something that you had longed for.

    2- un buen descanso en un paraíso

    Then comes the phrase - “a good rest in paradise.”
    Mexico is well known for its beautiful beaches, the most famous of which are Cancun, Mazatlan, Puerto Vallarta and Acapulco. Tourists come from all over the world to enjoy the Mexican beaches.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Antonio’s friends leave some comments.

    1- No creo que sea tan merecido.

    His college friend, Javier, uses an expression meaning - “I don’t think you deserve it that much.”
    Javier is being frivolous as he partakes in the conversation. He makes fun of his friend.

    2- Todos lo merecemos de vez en cuando.

    His neighbor, Angelica, uses an expression meaning - “We all deserve it once in a while.”
    Angelica disagrees with Javier, feeling that Antonio probably deserves relaxation sometimes!

    3- Es un buen lugar para relajarse.

    His high school friend, Karen, uses an expression meaning - “It is a good place to relax.”
    Karen feels the place contributes to relaxation.

    4- Que mal si está lleno de turistas.

    His wife’s nephew, Paco, uses an expression meaning - “Too bad if it’s full of tourists.”
    Paco is adding the note of negativity or criticism to the conversation - who knows what’s up with this nephew of Cristina’s!

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • descanso: “break”
  • paraíso: “paradise”
  • merecido, merecida: “deserved”
  • relajarse: “to relax “
  • lleno, llena: “full”
  • turista: “tourist”
  • todos: “everyone, all”
  • Which phrase would you use to comment in a friend’s feed?

    The break was great, but now it’s time to return home.

    20. What to Say in Mexican Spanish When You’re Home Again

    And you’re back! What will you share with friends and followers?

    Cristina returns home after a vacation, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Cristina’s post.

    Cansada pero feliz de estar de vuelta en la casa.
    “Tired but happy to be back home.”

    1- Cansada pero feliz

    First is an expression meaning “Tired but happy.”
    A commonly used phrase on social media that is used after finishing an activity. In this example, the first word is a feminine adjective that can also be changed to masculine.

    2- de estar de vuelta en la casa

    Then comes the phrase - “to be back home.”
    This phrase can be changed to express why you are happy. You can change the verb and the noun to fit your situation.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Cristina’s friends leave some comments.

    1- ¡Bienvenida de vuelta!

    Her neighbor, Angelica, uses an expression meaning - “Welcome back!”
    Angelica uses a warmhearted, traditional and commonly-used response to Cristina’s news.

    2- Ahora empieza la tarea de desempacar.

    Her college friend, Javier, uses an expression meaning - “The task of unpacking starts now.”
    Javier reminds them of reality.

    3- Espero que no se les haya olvidado mi regalo.

    Her nephew, Paco, uses an expression meaning - “I hope you did not forget my gift.”
    Paco seems to think only of himself with this comment!

    4- Quiero saber todo sobre el viaje.

    Her husband’s high school friend, Karen, uses an expression meaning - “I want to hear all about your trip.”
    Karen is excited to hear the details of the vacation.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • cansado, cansada: “tired”
  • feliz: “happy”
  • bienvenido, bienvenida: “welcome”
  • tarea: “task, chore”
  • desempacar: “unpack”
  • sobre: “about”
  • oír: “to hear”
  • How would you welcome a friend back from a trip?

    What do you post on social media during a public commemoration day such as Independence Day?

    21. It’s Time to Celebrate in Mexican Spanish

    It’s an historic day and you wish to post something about it on social media. What would you say?

    Antonio watches Independence Day fireworks show, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Antonio’s post.

    ¡Viva la Independencia!
    “Hurray for Independence!”

    1- Viva

    First is an expression meaning “Hurray.”
    This can mean “Long live…”,”Hurray”, and “Hail”. This word is very common during national holidays and is used to express support over a person and/or festivity.

    2- la Independencia

    Then comes the phrase - “the Independence.”
    Mexican Independence Day is the biggest celebration in the country. It commemorates the beginning of the war against the Spaniards that ruled over Mexico. Fireworks are displayed in every city and events are organized by the local government for the night of September 15.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Antonio’s friends leave some comments.

    1- ¡Qué empiece la celebración!

    His wife’s high school friend, Teresa, uses an expression meaning - “Let the celebration begin!”
    Teresa is equally exuberant about the big festivities.

    2- ¡Feliz día de la Independencia!

    His high school friend, Karen, uses an expression meaning - “Happy Independence Day!”
    Karen comments with the traditional greeting used on this day.

    3- Cuidado con los escandalosos

    His college friend, Javier, uses an expression meaning - “Beware of the boisterous.”
    Javier reminds Antonio that some participants in the festivities can be over-excited!

    4- ¡Es el día en que todos somos patrióticos!

    His wife’s high school friend, Teresa, uses an expression meaning - “It’s the day we’re all patriotic!”
    This is pointing out a fact about the day for all Mexicans.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • viva: “hurray”
  • independencia: “independence”
  • celebración: “celebration”
  • escandaloso, escandalosa: “boisterous”
  • patriótico, patriótica: “patriotic”
  • empezar: “to begin”
  • cuidado: “watch out”
  • If a friend posted something about a holiday, which phrase would you use?

    Independence Day and other public commemoration days are not the only special ones to remember!

    22. Posting about a Birthday on Social Media in Mexican Spanish

    Your friend or you are celebrating your birthday in an unexpected way. Be sure to share this on social media!

    Cristina attends her surprise birthday party, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Cristina’s post.

    ¡Gracias a todos por la fiesta de cumpleaños sorpresa!
    “Thank you all for the surprise birthday party!”

    1- Gracias a todos por

    First is an expression meaning “Thank you all for.”
    It is a common practice to thank a person or people on social media for something they have done for you. The word “all” can be changed to another noun to thank someone or something particularly.

    2- la fiesta de cumpleaños sorpresa

    Then comes the phrase - “the surprise birthday party. .”
    This can be changed to the specific thing you want to thank people for. For example, taking me to a concert, the support I have received, the great present, etc.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Cristina’s friends leave some comments.

    1- ¡Feliz cumpleaños!

    Her neighbor, Angelica, uses an expression meaning - “Happy birthday!”
    This is the universal, traditional greeting on any birthday.

    2- Gracias a todos por contribuir para la fiesta.

    Her husband, Antonio, uses an expression meaning - “Thank you all for contributing to the party.”
    Antonio is not just responding to Cristina - he makes use of the opportunity to express his gratitude to all their friends.

    3- ¡Espero y cumplas muchos años más!

    Her husband’s high school friend, Karen, uses an expression meaning - “I hope you have many more birthdays!”
    Karen extends a warm wish to Cristina on her birthday.

    4- ¿Verdad que mi pastel estuvo bien rico?

    Her high school friend, Teresa, uses an expression meaning - “My cake was very tasty, right?”
    Presumably Teresa baked the cake. If she didn’t, she means to be funny with this comment.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • fiesta: “party”
  • sorpresa: “surprise”
  • cumpleaños: “birthday”
  • contribuir: “to contribute”
  • años: “years”
  • pastel: “cake”
  • rico, rica: “tasty”
  • If a friend posted something about birthday greetings, which phrase would you use?

    23. Talking about New Year on Social Media in Mexican Spanish

    Impress your friends with your Spanish New Year’s wishes this year. Learn the phrases easily!

    Antonio celebrates the New Year, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Antonio’s post.

    Un brindis por un próspero año nuevo.
    “A toast to a prosperous New Year.”

    1- Un brindis por

    First is an expression meaning “A toast to.”
    As in many countries, toasts are offered during special occasions and are mainly done with alcoholic drinks. The word used during toasts in Mexico literally means “health” (in English the word is “cheers” ) as toasts are commonly done to wish good things for a person’s well being.

    2- un próspero año nuevo

    Then comes the phrase - “a prosperous New Year..”
    New Year’s Eve is also a big celebration in Mexico. Young adults and teenagers prefer to celebrate this holidays among friends and romantic partners.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Antonio’s friends leave some comments.

    1- ¡Salud! ¡Feliz Año Nuevo!

    His high school friend, Karen, uses an expression meaning - “Cheers! Happy New Year!”
    This is a casual, optimistic and commonly-used New Year’s wish.

    2- ¡Brindemos por todas las metas que no vamos a cumplir!

    His wife’s high school friend, Teresa, uses an expression meaning - “Let’s toast to all the goals we will not achieve!”
    Teresa’s comment is realistic and funny at the same time!

    3- Siempre nos proponemos las mismas metas.

    His college friend, Javier, uses an expression meaning - “We always propose the same goals.”
    Javier makes conversation with this comment.

    4- Espero que se propongan mejorar en el trabajo.

    His supervisor, Pablo, uses an expression meaning - “I hope you propose to improve at work. ”
    Pablo talks work…

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • brindis: “toast”
  • próspero, próspera: “prosperous”
  • salud: “cheers”
  • Año Nuevo: “New Year”
  • brindar: “to toast”
  • meta: “goal”
  • cumplir: “to accomplish”
  • Which is your favorite phrase to post on social media during New Year?

    But before New Year’s Day comes another important day…

    24. What to Post on Christmas Day in Mexican Spanish

    What will you say in Spanish about Christmas?

    Cristina celebrates Christmas with her family, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Cristina’s post.

    ¡Feliz Navidad a todos y disfruten de la nieve!
    “Merry Christmas to everyone and enjoy the snow!”

    1- Feliz Navidad a todos

    First is an expression meaning “Merry Christmas to all.”
    This phrase is used frequently during Christmas season. Christmas in Mexico is a time celebrated with family. Most business are closed on the 24th and 25th of December.

    2- y disfruten de la nieve

    Then comes the phrase - “and enjoy the snow.”
    The word for “snow” can also be changed to another noun or phrase. For example, gifts, family, Christmas’ dinner, etc.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Cristina’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Sube fotos de los regalos que trajo Santa Claus.

    Her high school friend, Teresa, uses an expression meaning - “Upload photos of the gifts Santa Claus brought.”
    Use this expression to be funny.

    2- Feliz Navidad de parte de la familia.

    Her nephew, Paco, uses an expression meaning - “Merry Christmas from the family. ”
    This is a friendly, commonly-used wish.

    3- ¡Muchas gracias por el regalo y espero que les guste el mío!

    Her neighbor, Angelica, uses an expression meaning - “Thank you very much for the present, and I hope you like mine!”
    Angelica uses social media to thank Cristina for her gift.

    4- ¡Una Navidad con nieve, que perfecto!

    Her husband’s high school friend, Karen, uses an expression meaning - “A Christmas with snow is perfect!”
    Karen clearly loves the snow and feels optimistic about Christmas.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • Navidad: “Christmas”
  • nieve: “snow”
  • Santa Claus: “Santa Claus”
  • perfecto, perfecta: “perfect”
  • con: “with”
  • regalo: “present”
  • gustar: “to like”
  • If a friend posted something about Christmas greetings, which phrase would you use?

    So, the festive season is over! Yet, there will always be other days, besides a birthday, to wish someone well.

    25. Post about Your Anniversary in Mexican Spanish

    Some things deserve to be celebrated, like wedding anniversaries. Learn which Spanish phrases are meaningful and best suited for this purpose!

    Antonio celebrates his wedding anniversary with his wife, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Antonio’s post.

    ¡Gracias por todo lo que hemos vivido juntos, mi vida!
    “Thank you for everything we have lived together, my dear! ”

    1- Gracias por todo lo que hemos vivido juntos

    First is an expression meaning “Thank you for all that we have lived together.”
    Most married couples like to celebrate their wedding anniversary every year. They go out to dinner, give each other gifts or go on a trip.

    2- mi vida

    Then comes the phrase - “my dear.”
    This is an affectionate way of calling your romantic partner. It is literally translates as “my life,” but it closely resembles “my dear”.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Antonio’s friends leave some comments.

    1- ¡Feliz aniversario, te amo!

    His wife, Cristina, uses an expression meaning - “Happy anniversary, I love you!”
    In answer to her husband’s sweet message, Cristina replies with a simple, loving greeting.

    2- ¿Qué le va a regalar a mi tía?

    His nephew, Paco, uses an expression meaning - “What will you give my aunt?”
    Paco seems to be protective of Cristina’s right to receive an amazing gift.

    3- Felicidades a los dos por su hermoso matrimonio.

    His neighbor, Angelica, uses an expression meaning - “Congratulations to both of you for your beautiful marriage.”
    Angelica seems to feel inspired by this marriage, and congratulate them accordingly!

    4- Disfruten su día como pareja.

    His high school friend, Karen, uses an expression meaning - “Enjoy your day as a couple. ”
    Karen shares a simple well-wish.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • juntos: “together”
  • aniversario: “anniversary”
  • regalar: “to gift”
  • hermoso, hermosa: “gorgeous”
  • matrimonio: “marriage”
  • pareja: “couple”
  • amar: “to love”
  • If a friend posted something about Anniversary greetings, which phrase would you use?

    Conclusion

    Learning to speak a new language will always be easier once you know key phrases that everybody uses. These would include commonly used expressions for congratulations and best wishes, etc.

    Master these in fun ways with Learn Spanish! We offer a variety of tools to individualize your learning experience, including using cell phone apps, audiobooks, iBooks and many more. Never wonder again what to say on social media!

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    How to Start Thinking in Spanish

    Learn 4 tools and techniques to stop translating in your head and start thinking in Spanish

    Going through Spanish lessons is enough to get by and learn the basics of Spanish, but to truly become fluent you need to be able to think in Spanish. This will allow you to have conversations with ease, read smoothly, and comprehensively understand natives. To do this, you need to go beyond just completing daily or weekly lessons.

    We naturally translate in our heads because it’s viewed as the easiest way to learn the definitions needed when learning a language. This way of learning can actually hinder your skills and fluency later on. If your brain has to make neural connections between the word you’re learning, what it means in your native tongue, and the physical object the connection will not be nearly as strong. When you bypass the original translation between Spanish and your native language then there is a more basic and strong connection between just the Spanish vocabulary word and the tangible object.

    start thinking in Spanish

    In this blog post, you will learn the 4 important techniques to easily and naturally begin to speculate about the daily occurrences in your life. The best part is all of these techniques are supported and can be achieved through SpanishPod101.com.

    Create Your Free Lifetime Account and Start Learning the whole Spanish Language from the Beginning!

    1. Surround yourself with Spanish

    Surround Yourself

    By surrounding yourself with Spanish constantly you will completely immerse yourself in the language. Without realizing it you’ll be learning pronunciation, sentence structures, grammar, and new vocabulary. You can play music in the background while you’re cooking or have a Spanish radio station on while you study. Immersion is a key factor with this learning process because it is one of the easiest things to do, but very effective. Even if you are not giving the program your full attention you will be learning.

    One great feature of SpanishPod101.com is the endless podcasts that are available to you. You can even download and listen to them on the go. These podcasts are interesting and are perfect for the intention of immersion, they are easy to listen to as background noise and are interesting enough to give your full attention. Many of them contain stories that you follow as you go through the lessons which push you to keep going.

    2. Learn through observation
    learn through observation

    Learning through observation is the most natural way to learn. Observation is how we all learned our native languages as infants and it’s a wonder why we stop learning this way. If you have patience and learn through observation then Spanish words will have their own meanings rather than meanings in reference to your native language. Ideally, you should skip the bilingual dictionary and just buy a dictionary in Spanish.

    SpanishPod101.com also offers the materials to learn this way. We have numerous video lessons which present situational usage of each word or phrase instead of just a direct translation. This holds true for many of our videos and how we teach Spanish.

    3. Speak out loud to yourself
    talk to yourself

    Speaking to yourself in Spanish not only gets you in the mindset of Spanish, but also makes you listen to how you speak. It forces you to correct any errors with pronunciation and makes it easy to spot grammar mistakes. When you speak out loud talk about what you did that day and what you plan to do the next day. Your goal is to be the most comfortable speaking out loud and to easily create sentences. Once you feel comfortable talking to yourself start consciously thinking in your head about your daily activities and what is going on around you throughout the day.

    With SpanishPod101.com you start speaking right away, not only this, but they have you repeat words and conversations after a native Spanish speaker. This makes your pronunciation very accurate! With this help, you are on the fast path to making clear and complex sentences and then actively thinking about your day.

    4. Practice daily

    If you don’t practice daily then your progress will be greatly slowed. Many people are tempted to take the 20-30 minutes they should be practicing a day and practice 120 in one day and skip the other days. This isn’t nearly as effective because everyday you practice you are reinforcing the skills and knowledge you have learned. If you practice all in one day you don’t retain the information because the brain can realistically only focus for 30 minutes at most. If you’re studying for 120 minutes on the same subject little of the information will be absorbed. Studying everyday allows you to review material that you went over previous days and absorb a small amount of information at a time.

    It’s tough to find motivation to study everyday, but SpanishPod101.com can help. It’s easy to stay motivated with SpanishPod101.com because we give you a set learning path, with this path we show how much progress you’ve made. This makes you stick to your goals and keep going!

    Conclusion

    Following the steps and having patience is the hardest part to achieving your goals, it’s not easy learning a new language. You are essentially teaching your brain to categorize the world in a completely new way. Stick with it and you can do it just remember the 4 tools I taught you today! With them, conversations, reading, and understanding will become much easier. The most important thing to remember is to use the tools that SpanishPod101.com provides and you will be on your way to being fluent!

    Learn Spanish With SpanishPod101 Today!

    3 Reasons Why Playing Games Helps You Learn Spanish Faster

    Discover 3 ways that Spanish learning games and video games can help you learn and master Spanish faster, retain more, and enhance your language skills.

    reasons why playing games helps you learn faster

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    Can You Learn Spanish Using Games?

    Yes, Spanish learning games and even video games can help you learn and master Spanish faster and improve overall comprehension. Research studies have concluded that video games enhance traditional learning methods and make mastering a new language like Spanish fun and exciting. Without the firm foundation in grammar and vocabulary provided by conventional learning programs, however, you will not be able to learn Spanish with games alone. But when you combine the solid educational foundation like you’ll get at SpanishPod101 with the benefits of Spanish learning games, you learn faster and retain more than with traditional learning alone.

    Let’s now take a look at three of the biggest benefits of using video games to learn Spanish:

    Video Games Help Improve Linguistic Skills and Cognitive Development

    When combined with a solid foundation in vocabulary and grammar, video games help students improve reading, comprehension, and even speaking skills. The results are even more pronounced in struggling students. According to a recent national survey, more than 78% of teachers noted that learning games, even video games, were effective in helping struggling students compensate for learning gaps in their traditional studies.

    So how do Spanish learning games, or even video games, help students improve their linguistic skills and cognitive development? The key is practice, practice, and more practice!
    Learning games and video games naturally require the integration of several linguistic skills including reading, listening, speaking, and even writing in some games. And by removing the fear of making mistakes so common in students in traditional classroom settings, students are free to practice the language and further develop their linguistic and cognitive abilities in the process.

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    Learning Games/Video Games Provide In-Context Learning

    Students naturally learn faster and comprehend more when they are forced to use the information often and in real-world situations, even the fake ones created by Spanish learning games and video games. Essentially, this is immersion-based learning or contextual learning very similar to what one experiences when living abroad and being forced to interact with people in another language. So by providing both context and constant feedback, video games allow students to actually use the knowledge they gain in classrooms or conventional study to learn and master Spanish or any new language faster.

    Spanish Learning Games Make Studying Fun and Alleviate Stress

    Homework, quizzes, tests, and even in-class assignments can cause a great deal of stress and anxiety in students, particularly those who may be struggling to keep up. This stress and anxiety can actually derail a student’s progress and cause them to feel isolated from their more successful peers. But video games and even most learning games are the great equalizer because they help alleviate stress, increase social engagement, and yes, even help students have fun while learning Spanish or any new language.
    In fact, research recently published in The Washington Post shows a wide range of health benefits from video games and learning games including the fact that they:

  • Help Reduce or Alleviate Symptoms of Depression
  • Help Reduce or Alleviate Symptoms of Insomnia
  • Help Alleviate Transitory Stress Symptoms
  • Scientists have indeed discovered that not only can you learn Spanish or any new language faster thanks to video games, they can also provide a wide range of potential health benefits as well. However, learning languages through video games alone is not really a feasible alternative to progressive, structured learning like you find in classrooms or programs like SpanishPod101.

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    The Limitations of Learning Languages Through Video Games

    While great supplemental learning tools, video games and even more formal learning games are simply no substitute for structured learning programs for two reasons:

  • Learning Games Not Designed to Provide a Foundation in Grammar or Vocabulary: Without the foundation provided by structured Spanish learning (classroom or online), video games or even language learning games only teach specific phrases and concepts. Now within the context of the video game, these phrases and concepts make sense but most would have little practical value in the real world.
  • Lessons Are Not Structured or Progressive in Nature: Structured learning requires students to be provided with basic building blocks of knowledge (like grammar or vocab lessons) that are then expanded upon in a progressive fashion until mastery. Video games and even many language learning games really only quiz and reinforce what students already know instead of providing structured lessons that can be built upon for future learning.
  • Spanish learning games and even video games are great supplemental tools to help students learn and master a language faster. Scientific studies and recent research reveal that video games can help contextualize formal lessons from structured learning, enhance linguistic skills, alleviate stress, and even provide a wide range of potential health benefits. However, learning languages through video games (even learning games) has limitations and is no substitute for structured lessons that provide a firm foundation in vocabulary and grammar.

    SpanishPod101 is the world’s most advanced online learning system with tons of HD video lessons created by real Spanish instructors. With more than 500 million lesson downloads and 10,000’s of success stories, SpanishPod101 can provide you with a world-class foundation in vocabulary and grammar.

    Combined with Spanish learning games, our cutting edge online language system can propel you to mastering the language faster, more easily, and at far less expense than traditional classroom instruction.

    4 Reasons Why Spanish Slang Words Will Make You Fluent

    Learn 4 honest reasons you need Spanish slang words and why they are so vital to truly learning and mastering the language.

    Teachers may normally cringe at the thought of their students learning Spanish slang words. After all, slang words and phrases are typically defined as being grammatically incorrect. So why would your teacher want you to spend time learning the “wrong way” to speak Spanish? Here are 4 of the top reasons why you should study slang words and expressions when learning Spanish or any new language.

    reasons to learn spanish slang words

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    1. Native Speakers Use Slang Expressions in Everyday Conversation

    If you are going to study a foreign language and plan to use it to speak with native speakers, then you have to learn slang words and expressions. Otherwise, just using formal expressions and grammar may alienate you from native speakers and make it more difficult to establish a real connection. So it is best to at least learn some common slang words and expressions if you’re planning to meet or speak socially with someone.

    2. Slang Words Are Used All Throughout Spanish Culture

    If you turn on any popular Spanish TV show, listen to any song, or watch any movie, you are quickly going to see the value of learning Spanish slang phrases. Just like everyday conversations between native speakers, Spanish culture is filled with slang phrases and expressions. Without at least some knowledge of the more common slang phrases, popular culture and most conversations will be very confusing and potentially alienating.

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    3. Slang Expressions Help You Better Express Your True Thoughts and Feelings

    Only relying on formal grammar and vocabulary is very limiting, especially in social situations. Just like in your native language, using the appropriate Spanish slang words can help you express a broader range of emotions, thoughts, and feelings.

    4. Proper Use of Slang Makes You Sound More Natural

    We’ve all met foreigners who technically used formal language perfectly but still sounded odd and well….foreign. But when you use the right slang words and expressions, you will sound more natural and like a true native speaker. If you notice, even most politicians include a sprinkling of slang expressions and words throughout their speeches to help them sound more natural and to better connect with the audience.

    The Dark Side of Slang Expressions

    Learning Spanish slang words can indeed help you sound more natural, better understand the people and culture, and make integration much easier. However, there is a dark side: using the wrong slang expressions can also make you look foolish, uneducated, and potentially disrespectful.

    But how do you know which slang words or phrases to use and when?

    The truth is that you can’t learn the most modern and appropriate slang words in textbooks or formal classroom settings. By the time the information gets incorporated into a formal curriculum, it’s already outdated and no longer in use by actual Spanish people. And while you can learn current slang expressions from Spanish TV shows, movies, songs, and games, you may not understand the context. If that happens, you may use the right Spanish slang words but in the wrong situation and still look like a fool or possibly even offend someone.

    Step out from the darkness and Get Your FREE PDF eBook to Start Learning Spanish!

    So where can you learn current slang expressions and the right context in which to use them?

    At SpanishPod101, native speaking instructors create audio and video lessons that can include slang expressions and words. Our instructors provide context and examples for all the Spanish slang words used in any lesson to make sure students understand the right time and place to use them.

    Spanish slang words and expressions may be grammatically incorrect but they are vital to truly understanding and immersing yourself in the culture. In fact, it will be very difficult to fully understand any movie, TV show, song, game, or even 1-on-1 conversation without knowing a few of the more common slang expressions.

    However, it is important to learn the proper context and use of even popular slang expressions or you may come across as confusing, disrespectful, or uneducated.
    At SpanishPod101, you’ll learn how to use slang phrases and words to draw the right attention and avoid these problems.

    Don’t forget to sign up for a Free Lifetime Account on SpanishPod101.com to access tons of FREE lessons and features to become fluent in Spanish!

    Top 20 Spanish Words and Phrases you need to survive the Apocalypse

    Zombies are coming, and they speak Spanish! Do you have what it takes to survive? No?
    How lucky you are, we have exactly what you need. Here is the Top 20 Words and Phrases you need to survive this Apocalypse!

    top Spanish words and phrases to survive zombies apocalypse

    Click here to listen how to pronounce those phrases!

    infección (n)
    infection

    espantoso (adj)
    scary

    calavera (n)
    skull

    tumba (n)
    grave

    ¿Cuál es tu película favorita de zombis?
    What’s your favorite zombie movie?

    https://media.giphy.com/media/kfztfA622HDGM/giphy.gif

    Click here to access this lesson for free!

    apocalipsis (n)
    apocalypse

    levantarse de la tumba.
    rise from the grave

    ¡Zombis! ¡Corre!
    Zombies! Run!

    Si hubiera un ataque de zombis, ¿a dónde irías?
    If there was a zombie attack, where would you go?

    sobrenatural (adj)
    supernatural

    https://media.giphy.com/media/idXYLeInD4wkU/giphy.gif

    reserva de alimentos (n)
    food supply

    muerto viviente
    walking dead

    piel de gallina (n)
    goose bumps

    imaginación (n)
    imagination

    cultura pop (n)
    pop culture

    https://media.giphy.com/media/3o85xHe5CUfiRi0d5m/giphy.gif

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    agua dulce (n)
    fresh water

    cadáver (n)
    corpse

    horripilante (adj)
    gruesome

    esconder (v)
    hide

    cementerio (n)
    graveyard

    Want to amaze zombies? Become their friends? Learn Spanish with our vocabulary lists!

    More sample sentences, vocabulary, audio and video lessons when you sign up for free at SpanishPod101.com.