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Level Up with These Intermediate Spanish Words

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If you’re here, it’s because you succeeded in mastering Spanish at the beginner level. Enhorabuena! (“Congratulations!”) Now it’s time to take it a step further by picking up some intermediate Spanish words. 

Jumping from beginner to intermediate level can be a scary move. It means that you have to get out there and try out your newly acquired skills…and actually speak Spanish to people!! But that’s why we’re here, right?

Intermediate Spanish lessons are very exciting because they allow you to start expressing yourself more freely and having more fluent conversations. At this stage, you can master everyday vocabulary and actually start making friends within the native Spanish-speaking community.

This intermediate Spanish wordlist will give you the tools you need to level up and gain enough confidence to live your life in Spanish.

Vamos allá! (“Let’s go!”)

Four Friends Chatting with Coffee Beverages

Start making friends in Spanish!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Spanish Table of Contents
  1. (Larger) Numbers
  2. Nouns
  3. Verbs
  4. Adjectives
  5. Adverbs
  6. Prepositions
  7. Conjunctions
  8. Connectives
  9. Possessive Pronouns
  10. Final Thoughts

1. (Larger) Numbers

In our Spanish beginner words article, you learned how to count from one to ten. Ready to reach the next level? In this intermediate Spanish category, you’ll learn all of the cardinal numbers. This means that you’ll be able to count from eleven to infinity!

From 11 to 19

  • once → “eleven”
  • doce → “twelve”
  • trece → “thirteen”
  • catorce → “fourteen”
  • quince → “fifteen”
  • dieciséis → “sixteen”
  • diecisiete → “seventeen”
  • dieciocho → “eighteen”
  • diecinueve → “nineteen”

From 20 to 90

  • veinte → “twenty”
  • treinta → “thirty”
  • cuarenta → “forty”
  • cincuenta → “fifty”
  • sesenta → “sixty”
  • setenta → “seventy”
  • ochenta → “eighty”
  • noventa → “ninety”

As a general pattern, you can add y and a number 1-9 to express the rest of the numbers. You can already see this pattern in, for example, diecisiete:

  • diecisiete = diez + y + siete

With tens and twenties, words are written together following the pattern shown above (with some slight changes). So, if you wanted to say “twenty-three,” it would be:

  • veintitrés = veinte + y + tres

Starting from the thirties, however, things get even easier and the words are written separately. Here are a few examples:

  • treinta y uno “thirty-nine” 
  • sesenta y cuatro “sixty-four”
  • ochenta y uno “eighty-one”

From 100 to 900

  • cien “one hundred”
  • doscientos “two hundred”
  • trescientos “three hundred”
  • cuatrocientos “four hundred”
  • quinientos “five hundred”
  • seiscientos “six hundred”
  • setecientos “seven hundred”
  • ochocientos “eight hundred”
  • novecientos “nine hundred”

In Spanish, numbers in the hundreds are quite easy to form. The first word is the “hundred” figure, then you leave a space and add the number that follows. Here’s an example:

  • cuatrocientos setenta y tres → “four hundred seventy-three”

However, you need to remember that there is one exception to the rule! Cien becomes ciento when followed by another number. Like this:

  • ciento seis “one hundred and six”

From 1,000 to 9,000

  • mil “one thousand”
  • dos mil “two thousand”
  • tres mil “three thousand”
  • cuatro mil “four thousand”
  • cinco mil “five thousand”
  • seis mil “six thousand”
  • siete mil “seven thousand”
  • ocho mil → “eight thousand”
  • nueve mil → “nine thousand”

As with the hundreds, the Spanish thousands are also formed by leaving a space after the first one or two words (depending on whether it’s mil or dos mil, tres mil, etc.) and adding the number that follows. Here are a couple of examples:

  • dos mil veinte → “two thousand and twenty”
  • cinco mil trescientos sesenta y nueve → “five thousand three hundred seventy-nine”

Note that, even though Spanish uses the same numerals as English does, there is a tiny difference in how we write them. Starting from the thousands, instead of separating the hundreds, thousands, millions, etc., with a comma, we use a dot in Spanish. Here’s how you should do it:

  • 1.000 → “1,000”
  • 4.589 → “4,589”

From 1,000,000 to Infinity

  • un millón “one million”
  • dos millones “two million”
  • tres millones “three million”
  • diez millones “ten million”
  • cuatrocientos millones “four hundred million”
  • siete mil millones “seven billion”

Millions are usually the last piece you need to learn in order to count to infinity. As in English, “billón” (“billion”) can also be used to say “a thousand million”. However, this expression is not widespread in Spain, and it’s still common to hear mil millones.

A Little Girl Counting on Her Fingers

Now you can count to infinity!

2. Nouns

In our Spanish beginner words article, we already introduced you to plenty of everyday vocabulary—the essential basics you need to survive in a Spanish-speaking environment!

In this guide, we’re taking things to the next level. Memorizing the words on this list will give you a solid intermediate Spanish vocabulary base to help you manage most everyday conversations. Stay tuned for useful words related to time, home, and leisure!

    → Don’t forget that SpanishPod101.com also has plenty of free vocabulary lists to help you learn all the Spanish nouns you need!

2.1 – Time

2.1.1 – Time Units

SegundoSecond
MinutoMinute
HoraHour
DíaDay
SemanaWeek
MesMonth
TrimestreTrimester
SemestreSemester
AñoYear
SigloCentury


2.1.2 – Days of the Week

LunesMonday
MartesTuesday
MiércolesWednesday
JuevesThursday
ViernesFriday
SábadoSaturday
DomingoSunday

2.1.3 – Time of Day

MañanaMorning
MediodíaMidday
TardeAfternoon
Evening
NocheNight
MadrugadaDawn

2.2 – Home

2.2.1 – Rooms in the House

RecibidorHall
CocinaKitchen
ComedorDining room
SalónLiving room
Baño
Lavabo
Bathroom
DormitorioBedroom
EstudioStudy
JardínGarden
PatioCourtyard
TerrazaTerrace
BalcónBalcony
GarageGarage
HabitaciónRoom

A Beautiful Porch

¡Qué bonito balcón! (“What a nice balcony!”)

2.2.2 – House Objects

CamaBed
MesaTable
EscritorioDesk
SillaChair
VáterToilet
SofáCouch
CortinasCurtains
PersianaBlinds

2.2.3 – Kitchenware

CubiertosCutlery
TenedorFork
CuchilloKnife
CucharaSpoon
PlatoDish
VasoGlass
CopaGlass
Wineglass
OllaPot
SarténPan

2.3 – Leisure

2.3.1 – Vacations and Free Time

ViajeTrip
MaletaLuggage
VacacionesHolidays
CineMovie theater
TeatroTheater
RestauranteRestaurant
DeporteSport

2.3.2 – Holidays

NavidadChristmas
Año NuevoNew Years
Semana SantaEaster
Día de Todos los SantosAll Saints Day

    → Curious about Spanish holidays? Don’t miss all of the interesting posts about Spanish culture and traditions on SpanishPod101’s blog!

3. Verbs 

After learning all of the useful nouns listed above, you’ll also need to pick up some more verbs to get your Spanish conversations flowing!

Verbs are always the most feared grammar category for Spanish students, but don’t worry! If you’re still struggling, don’t miss SpanishPod101’s ultimate guide to Spanish conjugation.

Here are the intermediate Spanish verbs you’ll need to master everyday conversations:

3.1 – Home

3.1.1 – Chores

CocinarTo cook
LimpiarTo clean
LavarTo wash
Tender (la ropa)To hang (the clothes)
Doblar (la ropa)To fold (the clothes)
Planchar (la ropa)To iron (the clothes)
Hacer la camaTo make the bed
Sacar / tirar la basuraTo take out the garbage

3.1.2 – Cooking

FreírTo fry
CalentarTo heat up
EnfriarTo cool down
HervirTo boil
AsarTo roast
BatirTo beat
PelarTo peel

3.2 – Hobbies

BailarTo dance
CantarTo sing
PintarTo paint
DibujarTo draw
CorrerTo run
NadarTo swim
PasearTo go for a walk
Jugar a + […]To play + [game or sport]
As in English, jugar can refer to playing games or sports.

Here are some examples:
  • Jugar a fútbol → “To play football”
  • Jugar a balonmano → “To play handball”
  • Jugar al Monopoly → “To play Monopoly”
Tocar + […]To play + [instrument name]
However, to play an instrument in Spanish is not expressed with jugar. The correct verb is tocar:
  • Tocar el piano → “To play the piano”
  • Tocar la gaita → “To play the bagpipe” (This phrase is also a Spanish idiom that means “to be annoying.”)
ViajarTo travel

3.3 – Other Useful Expressions

QuedarTo meet with
Llamar por teléfonoTo call
Mandar mensajeTo text
Llegar tardeTo be late
Estar ocupadoTo be busy

Someone Playing the Bagpipe

Tocar la gaita” can have two very different meanings…!

4. Adjectives

In our beginner words article, you learned the basic adjectives you need to describe objects, people, emotions, and the weather. Now it’s time to level up by learning how to describe temporary conditions, state your opinion, and more. Here are the most useful intermediate Spanish adjectives for you: 

4.1 – Opinion

BuenoGood
MolaBad
GenialAwesome
PerfectoPerfect
HorribleHorrible
RaroWeird
AburridoBoring
InteresanteInteresting
OrgullosoProud
AvergonzadoEmbarrassed

4.2 – Conditions

LlenoFull
VacíoEmpty
LimpioClean
SucioDirty
RotoBroken
EnfermoSick
SanoHealthy
CasadoMarried
SolteroSingle
VivoAlive
MuertoDead

4.3 – Useful Everyday Adjectives

BaratoCheap
CaroExpensive
FácilEasy
DifícilDifficult
PeligrosoDangerous
SeguroSafe
TóxicoToxic
NuevoNew
ViejoOld
ComúnCommon
TípicoTypical
ÚtilUseful

A Woman Carrying a Map while Traveling

Este mapa es muy útil. (“This map is very useful.”)

5. Adverbs

As you begin going through intermediate Spanish lessons, you’ll find that adverbs become increasingly important! These words are a crucial part of conversational Spanish and help you make your point clear. They allow you to emphasize what you’re saying, state the location of an object, locate an event at a particular moment in time…

Excited already? Well, once you finish learning these intermediate Spanish adverbs, you can graduate to our guide on the 100 most common Spanish adverbs!

5.1 – Quantity

MuyVery
MuchoA lot
MenosLess
DemasiadoToo much
PocoA little
MásMore
SuficienteEnough

5.2 – Location

CercaNear
LejosFar
Al ladoNext to
En 
Dentro de
In 
Inside
En 
Encima de
On 
On top of
Debajo de 
Bajo de
Under
DelanteIn front of
DetrásBehind
EntreBetween
A la derechaOn the right
A la izquierdaOn the left

5.3 – Time

HoyToday
AyerYesterday
MañanaTomorrow
AnteayerThe day before yesterday
Pasado mañanaAfter tomorrow

5.4 – Other Useful Adverbs

SiempreAlways
NuncaNever
AhoraNow
PreviamentePreviously
PreviamenteCurrently
YaAlready

A Woman Covering Her Mouth with Both Hands

Nunca digas nunca… (“Never say never…”)

6. Prepositions

Our next set of intermediate Spanish words consists of prepositions. These are little words that allow your speech to flow much better and help you be more precise in your conversations. 

Let’s start with the locative prepositions that, together with adverbs, help you point out the position or direction of the person/thing you’re talking about.

6.1 – Location and Direction

ATo
Al lado deNext to
Alrededor deAround
A través deThrough
ContraAgainst
DeFrom
JuntoNear
HaciaTowards
SobreOn 
Over
TrasBehind

6.2 – Other Useful Prepositions

A favor deIn favor of
A pesar deDespite
Excepto 
Salvo
Except
Gracias aThanks to
InclusoEven
PorBy
ParaFor
SegúnAccording to
SinWithout


7. Conjunctions

Intermediate Spanish learners should make an effort to learn at least a few conjunctions, as these words help you connect words and sentences. As a beginner, you probably learned the more basic conjunctions (esto y aquello – “this and that”). But learning how to use more advanced conjunctions can help you level up your conversational skills and enrich your speech/writing. 

Let’s see some Spanish conjunctions in three different categories: 

7.1 – Causal

PorqueBecause
ComoAs
Like
Ya queBecause 
Since 
As
Dado que 
Visto que 
Puesto que
Since 
Given that
PuesSince 
As 
So

7.2 – Comparison

QueThan
Como siAs if 
As though
Sin queWithout

7.3 – Concession

AunqueEven if Although Though
Aun cuandoEven when
Si bienIf
Por más que 
Por mucho que
As much as

A Woman Holding a Crate Full of Kittens

Os quiero, aunque a veces os portáis mal. (“I love you, even though you sometimes misbehave.”)

8. Connectives

  • Sin embargo Nevertheless / However
  • En efecto / Efectivamente → Indeed
  • Con todo Even so
  • Por eso → That’s why
  • En primer lugar In the first place
  • En segundo lugar In the second place
  • Ahora bien However / Having said that
  • En ese caso→ In that case
  • A pesar de ello In spite of that
  • Por el contrario On the contrary

9. Possessive Pronouns

Pronouns are a great tool for producing more fluent speech, as they allow you to avoid repeating clauses and nouns excessively so you can get straight to the point. SpanishPod101’s Ultimate Guide to Spanish Pronouns will help you learn how to use them properly! 

In this article, we’ll focus exclusively on possessive pronouns. We’ve included all singular/plural and masculine/feminine forms. 

SpanishEnglish
singularplural
singular1st mimismy
2ndtutusyour
3rdsusushis
her
plural1stnuestronuestrosour
nuestranuestras
2ndvuestrovuestrosyour
vuestravuestras
3rdsusustheir

A Couple Greeting Guests to Their Home

Mi casa es tu casa. (“My house is your house.”)

10. Final Thoughts

In this guide to intermediate Spanish words, you’ve gained a handful of new tools to get your Spanish conversational skills to the next level. Apart from useful nouns, verbs, and adjectives, you’ve learned handy connective words, adverbs, and prepositions that will help you be more precise and fluent in your speech. 

Did you know any of these words already, or were they all new to you? 

Either way, don’t stop here! SpanishPod101 has plenty of intermediate Spanish lessons for you to explore. And you’ll even find that, once you graduate from that category, there’s still an entire upper intermediate lesson series that will continue guiding you on your Spanish learning journey. 

Of course, don’t forget to check out the free vocabulary lists and other useful tools on SpanishPod101.com.

Enjoy!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Spanish