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74 Common Spanish Travel Phrases

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One of the most common answers language learners give when we’re asked why we chose to learn that language is because we like the country or countries where it’s spoken. Therefore, it’s not a surprise that if you’re learning Spanish, you might like to visit Spain. So why not learn Spanish travel words and phrases?

Whether you choose to travel to Spain for a short holiday or for a longer time, here you’ll learn all the vocabulary you need to find your way in Madrid, Barcelona, Seville, or any other city you want to visit. You probably already know that Spanish people aren’t that great at speaking English, especially in small towns, so if you want to avoid misunderstandings, this is the way to go.

Our purpose today is to teach you some common Spanish travel phrases that will help you be understood if you need help while you’re traveling in Spain—or if you want to order food, book a hotel room, get a cab, or take the bus. But even more importantly, we’re going to help you understand the answers you’ll receive!

Surely you don’t want to ask a local how to get to your hotel only to not understand the answer. That would make the whole process of learning the questions quite useless, wouldn’t it? Well, there’s no need to worry, because we’re making sure our guide of Spanish for travelers includes all of the Spanish phrases for travel you’ll need.

Without further ado, let’s delve into our list of useful Spanish words for tourists!

Table of Contents

  1. Ten Basic Expressions
  2. Nine Simple Conversation Phrases
  3. Nine Basic Spanish Phrases for Travel
  4. Seven Sentences You Might Need When Shopping
  5. Nine Sentences You Might Need in a Restaurant
  6. Nine Sentences to Ask for and Give Directions
  7. Six Expressions You Might Need in Case of an Emergency
  8. Five Flattery Phrases
  9. Ten Useful Phrases to Go through Language Problems
  10. How SpanishPod101.com Can Help You Learn Spanish

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1. Ten Basic Expressions

Preparing To Travel

Let’s start from the beginning. It’s practically impossible to have a proper conversation without using any of these basic expressions, so you’re going to need them. If you already know them, don’t worry; you can skip this section! And keep in mind that to hear these Spanish travel phrases with pronunciation, as well as more Spanish words and phrases, you can visit our vocabulary lists on our website.

1- Hola

As most of you might already know, Hola means “Hello.” It’s by far the most commonly used greeting in Spanish and can be used at any time of the day.

If you would like to learn more ways of greeting someone, you can check out our article How to Say Hello in Spanish.

2- Gracias

Once again, this is one of the most common Spanish words. It means “Thank you” and it’s obviously a basic word in many conversations. We would like our tourists to be polite, so we hope you use it a lot!

3- De nada

Now you know how to say “Thank you,” but do you know what to say after someone thanks you in Spanish? De nada literally means “Of nothing” and it translates to “You’re welcome.”

4-

In our first list of basic expressions in Spanish, we can’t forget to include words like “Yes” and “No.” Again, you probably already knew that means “yes,” but here it is just in case!

5- No

This is clearly one of the easiest travel phrases in Spanish for most of you. No in Spanish means “no.”

6- Lo siento

Lo siento is one of the most common ways of saying “I’m sorry” in Spanish and you can use it the majority of the time when you wish to apologize to someone. But if you would like to know what the most appropriate expression is for different situations, feel free to read our article on How to Say “Sorry” in Spanish.

7- No hablo español

If you don’t feel comfortable enough speaking Spanish yet, it might be useful for you to be able to say “I don’t speak Spanish.” If you want to apologize for not speaking Spanish, remember that you can combine it with the previous expression on the list: Lo siento, no hablo español.

8- Me gusta

Whenever you want to express that you like something, you can say Me gusta. If you want to be specific and say what it is that you like, you can add a verb in its infinitive form, a noun, or a pronoun.

Example: Me gusta bailar.
Translation: “I like dancing.”

Example: Me gustan los helados.
Translation: “I like ice cream.”

9- No me gusta

If you don’t like something, all you need to do is add no just before me gusta.

Example: No me gusta correr.
Translation: “I don’t like running.”

10- Por supuesto

The last expression on this list might not be as important as the rest, but it’s still good to know. Por supuesto means “of course.”


2. Nine Simple Conversation Phrases

Survival Phrases

Besides the basic expressions we just saw, there are a few sentences you might need to know so that you can have a basic conversation when you meet someone for the first time. These are often included in some of the first lessons when you start learning a language, but they’re always good to review.

You might want to take a look at our Top 10 Sentence Patterns for Beginners in case you’re not too familiar with them yet.

1- ¿Cómo te llamas?

One of the first questions you might ask someone you just met is “What’s your name?” This is one of the key Spanish travel phrases you should know, especially when it comes to forming relationships while in Spain.

2- Me llamo Ana / Soy Ana.

Obviously, if you learn how to ask what someone’s name is, you also need to know how to reply! Two of the most common ways of saying “My name is…” are Me llamo… or Soy… followed by your name. The last one only means “I’m…” but just like in English, it’s still an option.

3- ¿Cuántos años tienes?

This is another common question: “How old are you?” Interestingly, when we talk about our age in Spanish, we use the verb tener, which means “to have.” This means that the literal translation to this question is “How many years do you have?”

4- Tengo 25 (veinticinco) años.

As mentioned above, the literal translation to this answer is “I have 25 years.” Of course, it translates to “I am 25 years old.”

If you’re not yet comfortable with numbers in Spanish, we have you covered: check out our Numbers in Spanish article.

5- ¿De dónde eres?

This question means, “Where are you from?” Because people are normally curious when they hear a foreign accent or language, it tends to be heard quite frequently when someone’s traveling.

6- Soy de Australia / Soy australiano/a.

There are two different ways of replying to the previous question, and they’re very similar to what you would say in English. Soy de Australia means, “I am from Australia,” and Soy australiano (or australiana) means “I’m Australian.”

To learn more nationalities in Spanish, take a look at our Spanish Vocabulary for Nationalities.

7- ¿Dónde vives?

And finally, here’s our last basic question. ¿Dónde vives? means “Where do you live?”

8- Vivo en Londres

As you might expect, this sentence is the answer to the previous question. Vivo en Londres means “I live in London.” We chose this city because its name is a bit different than it is in English.

Now you might be wondering if all cities have different names in Spanish. Well, luckily, this doesn’t always happen, but it does happen sometimes. Normally, when they’re not that easy to pronounce for Spanish speakers, the names will be changed. Here’s a list of Names of World Cities in Spanish that might help you.

9- ¿Me puedes sacar una foto?

This sentence isn’t as important as the rest, but it’s still really useful to know when you’re traveling. If you travel solo and your parents want to see how you’re doing on your travels, but you’re not a big fan of selfies, you’re going to have to ask someone to take a photo of you.

The way of asking “Could you take a photo of me?” in Spanish is ¿Me puedes sacar una foto?

Of course, if you’re traveling as a couple or even with a group, you might still want to ask a local to take a photo of you. You can ask this question in the plural by saying: ¿Nos puedes sacar una foto?

For a few more useful questions, take a look at our Top 15 Spanish Questions You Should Know for Conversations.


3. Nine Basic Spanish Phrases for Travel

Airplane Phrases

Let’s get to more specific and useful Spanish travel phrases. Regardless of where you’re traveling, you’ll be taking cabs, trains, or buses. This is why we’ve listed a few sentences you might need if you take any of these means of transportation.

In each of these examples, we’ve marked in bold the most important part of the sentence. So, if you need to use any of these essential Spanish travel phrases for transportation, you’ll use the part in bold and change the rest of the sentence whenever you need to.

1- Three Sentences You Will Need When You Take a Cab

  • ¿Dónde puedo coger un taxi?
    Translation: “Where can I take a cab?”
  • Me puedes llevar a la calle San Juan, ¿por favor?
    Translation: “Could you take me to Saint John’s Street, please?”
  • Al aeropuerto, por favor.
    Translation: “To the airport, please.”

2- Three Sentences You Will Need When You Take a Train

  • Dos billetes para ir a Pamplona, por favor.
    Translation: “Two tickets to go to Pamplona, please.”
  • Un billete de ida y vuelta a Madrid, por favor.
    Translation: “One round-trip ticket to Madrid, please.”
  • ¿En qué andén se coge el tren R5?
    Translation: “On which platform can I take the R5 train?”

People

3- Three Sentences You Will Need When You Take a Bus

  • ¿Me puedes avisar cuando lleguemos al Museo del Prado?
    Translation: “Could you let me know when we arrive to the Museo del Prado?”
  • ¿Dónde me bajo para visitar la catedral?
    Translation: “Where do I get off to visit the cathedral?”
  • ¿Qué autobús tengo que coger para ir a Valencia?
    Translation: “What bus do I need to take to get to Valencia?”


4. Seven Sentences You Might Need When Shopping

Basic Questions

No matter what kind of trip you’re on, you’ll need to buy something at some point. It could be food, clothes, medicine…who knows. We’ve put together a few sentences you might need in order to buy something in Spain. These may be more advanced Spanish phrases for travel, but you can definitely master these with enough practice!

1- ¿Cuánto cuesta?

When we’re shopping, we sometimes need to ask about the price of a product, more often than not due to misplaced price tags. This is why asking “How much does this cost?” is such an important question to know. Obviously, the answer to this question is even more important. Here’s an example of how a conversation might go:

Example:
A: Perdona, ¿cuánto cuesta esta chaqueta?
B: Cuesta 35 (treinta y cinco) euros.

Translation:
A: “Excuse me, how much does this jacket cost?”
B: “It costs 35 euros.”

In case you skipped the simple conversation section in this article, we’ll remind you once more that if you want to know more about numbers in Spanish, you can check out our Numbers in Spanish article.

2- ¿Qué me recomiendas?

This question means, “What’s your recommendation?” and you might need to use it when you’re not sure what to get.

For example, one thing we’re really proud of in Spain is our jamón. You might want to try it when you visit Spain, but when you come to our supermarkets or restaurants and see all the different kinds we have, you might be confused.

In our example, because we’re asking for a specific recommendation, we’ll add a noun—the thing we’re interested in—after qué. This is optional except when what you’re referring to isn’t that obvious.

Example:
A: Qué jamón me recomiendas?
B: Este es buenísimo y no es muy caro.

Translation:
A: “What ham do you recommend?”
B: “This one is really good and it’s not too expensive.”

Ham

3- Quiero cambiar dólares a euros.

When traveling, you might need to exchange your currency for the local one, which in this case is the Euro. Specifically, the translation of this sentence is, “I want to exchange dollars for euros.”

For more information on talking about money or currency in Spanish, you might find it useful to check this vocabulary list of Words Related to Trade.

4- ¿Cómo puedo conseguir un descuento?

You might not be able to use this one as often as the other sentences on this list, depending on where you are, but it’s still good to know how to ask the question, “How can I get a discount?”

5- ¿Tienes esta camisa en otro color?

In case you see a shirt you like, but you can’t stop thinking that it would look better in a darker color, you might want to know how to ask ¿Tienes esta camisa en otro color? which means “Do you have this shirt in a different color?”

Other similar questions you might need to ask include asking for a different size. Here’s an example:

Example:
A: Perdona, ¿tienes estos pantalones en una talla más grande?
B: Lo siento, solo tenemos esta talla o una más pequeña.

Translation:
A: “Excuse me, do you have these trousers in a bigger size?”
B: “I’m sorry, we only have this size or a smaller one.”

6- ¿Se puede pagar con tarjeta?

You’ll never have to ask “Can I pay by card?” in a big supermarket, but it might be helpful if you’re buying something in a small store, or in a local market.

Girl

7- ¿Dónde hay un cajero?

In case the answer to the previous question is “No” and you currently don’t have any cash on you, you’re going to need to ask where the nearest ATM is. The way to ask this is ¿Dónde hay un cajero?

If you think you might have trouble understanding the possible answers to this question, keep reading this article!


5. Nine Sentences You Might Need in a Restaurant

Chef Cooking

When it comes to Spanish travel and tourism vocabulary, we think that restaurant words and phrases just about top the list.

In this section, we’ve included a few sentences you’ll need in a restaurant. However, if we started listing all the vocabulary you would need to order food, we would be here all night long, so this is why we recommend our video All Food and Restaurant Phrases You Need. In this video, Rosa will explain everything you need to know about food in general, and also about Spanish food.

1- Mesa para dos, por favor.

Unless you’re at a fast-food restaurant, normally one of the first things you’ll have to tell the waiter is how many people will be eating, so that they can pick the right table for you. This situation can take place in a few different ways.

For example, the waiter might ask you as soon as you walk in how many people there will be. There are a few ways they can ask you this question, but the one thing we know for sure is that it will include the word cuántos, which means “how many.” He could ask ¿Cuántos son? which means “How many are you?” or ¿Mesa para cuántos? which means “Table for how many?” among others. If you’re asked this question, you can just say the number, or the magic sentence in the title.

There’s a second way this could happen: the waiter might count how many people he sees before asking that question. For example, if he counts four people, he might directly ask: ¿Mesa para cuatro?, which means, “Table for four?” If he gets the number right, you can just reply . If he gets it wrong, you can correct him with the right number.

Finally, the third way this situation could go. You could be faster than the waiter and say Mesa para dos, por favor, which means “Table for two, please.” We previously said this is a magic sentence; let us explain why. If you’re still nervous whenever you need to speak Spanish and you didn’t understand what the waiter said to you, they’ll completely understand if you just say these words. Just like that, you’re in! Now let’s get you ready for what comes right after that.

2- ¿Cuál es el menú del día?

It’s common for Spanish restaurants to have a special menu for each day. Before deciding what you want to order, you can ask them ¿Cuál es el menú del día? which means “What’s the menu of the day?”

If you don’t like the special menu, don’t worry, because they’ll always have more options on the regular menu.

3- Por favor, ¿me tomas nota?

It’s quite likely that the waiter will approach you after you’ve been deciding what to get for a while. But in case you’re getting hungry and the waiter hasn’t asked what you would like to eat yet, when you see him you can ask him Por favor, ¿me tomas nota? which translates to “Can you write down my order, please?”

4- ¿Qué van a tomar?

Once the waiter has approached your table, you’ll be asked what you would like to order. It’s common for waiters to use the formal usted instead of , so the sentence we’ve suggested, ¿Qué van a tomar?, uses that form.

Another similar question the waiter might ask you is: ¿Ya han decidido qué van a tomar? which means “Have you decided what you’re going to have?”

Notice that both examples are in the plural. If you were eating by yourself in the restaurant, the waiter would ask ¿Qué va a tomar? instead.

Waiter

5- Yo tomaré…

Of course, if you’re eating in a restaurant, you need to know how to tell your waiter what you would like to eat. Here’s an example of how to order your food in Spanish.

Example: Yo tomaré las costillas de cerdo con ensalada.
Translation: “I will have the pork ribs with salad.”

6- ¡Camarero/camarera!

If you need to call the waiter for any reason, unless you know his or her name, you’ll have to say “Waiter!” or “Waitress!” This is one of the many reasons why you should know how to say it in Spanish. If your server is a girl, you’ll have to say ¡camarera!, and if it’s a man, you’ll say ¡camarero! If you feel like that’s a bit too rude for you, you can also say Perdona, which means “Excuse me.” Here’s an example that we hope you won’t need:

Example: ¡Camarero! ¡Hay un pelo en mi sopa!
Translation: “Waiter! There’s a hair in my soup!”

7- ¿Algo más?

This question means, “Anything else?” and might be asked after you’ve ordered your food and the waiter wants to make sure that you’ve finished.

The answer to this question, if you have in fact finished ordering, could be No, eso es todo, which means “No, that is all.” If you still want to order something else, you can of course say , followed by your next order.

8- Tengo alergia a…

For people with allergies, it’s important to be able to let the waiter know about it. The way to say, “I’m allergic to…” is Tengo alergia a

Example: Tengo alergia a los cacahuetes.
Translation: “I’m allergic to peanuts.”

You might also want to ask if a specific dish contains an ingredient in particular.

Example: Perdona, ¿la crema de calabaza lleva lactosa?
Translation: “Excuse me, does the pumpkin soup contain lactose?”

To be even safer, you can check Spanish Materials and Resources from Food Allergy Research & Education for some help.

9- La cuenta, ¿por favor?

The last sentence on this list is what you might need to say last, before you leave. As you might have guessed, this is how to ask for the bill. This sentence means “The bill, please?” and even though you could ask using a full sentence instead, this is all you’ll need.


6. Nine Sentences to Ask for and Give Directions

We’re sure you knew this section would come. After all, learning directions are some of the most essential travel phrases in learning Spanish and we don’t want you to get lost when you visit our beautiful country. But if you do, we want to help you find your way.

Here are some sentences you might need if you’re lost or can’t find your destination. Because these sentences have quite simple meanings, we don’t think you’re going to need anything but their translations.

People

1- Estoy perdido.

Translation: “I’m lost.”

2- ¿Dónde está la estación?

Translation: “Where is the station?”

3- ¿Cómo se va a la Plaza Mayor?

Translation: “How can I get to the Main Square?”

4- ¿Dónde está el baño?

Translation: “Where is the bathroom?”

5- Está aquí mismo

Translation: “It’s right here.”

6- Está detrás de este edificio

Translation: “It’s behind this building.”

7- Ve/gira hacia la derecha

Translation: “Go/turn to the right.”

8- Ve/gira hacia la izquierda

Translation: “Go/turn to the left.”

9- Ve recto

Translation: “Go straight.”


7. Six Expressions You Might Need in Case of an Emergency

We really hope you never need to use any of these expressions, but they’re important and need to be included in this article. Just in case, here are some emergency expressions.

1- ¡Ayuda!

Translation: “Help!”

2- ¡Necesito ayuda!

Translation: “I need help!”

3- Llama a una ambulancia.

Translation: “Call an ambulance.”

4- ¿Hay algún médico?

Translation: “Is there any doctor?”

5- Llama al 112 (cien doce)

Translation: “Call 112 [the emergency number].”

6- He perdido la cartera/pasaporte.

Translation: “I’ve lost my wallet/passport.”


8. Five Flattery Phrases

Whenever you travel to a different country, locals love hearing that you’re having a good time on your trip and that you’re enjoying the country. If you want to criticize something, be careful and gentle, because as they say, you can criticize your own country as much as you want, but if a foreigner does it, they’re wrong. So if anyone asks you, try to focus on the positive side!

Here’s a few basic phrases you could use to express what you like about your trip, as well as a couple more you might need when you meet a local.

1- Me gustan los españoles.

Translation: “I like Spaniards.”

2- Me gusta la comida española.

Translation: “I like Spanish food.”

3- Me encanta España.

Translation: “I love Spain.”

4- Muy amable, gracias.

Translation: “Very kind, thank you.”

5- ¿Tienes Facebook o Instagram?

Translation: “Do you have Facebook or Instagram?”


9. Ten Useful Phrases to Go through Language Problems

World Map

Some of the most important Spanish travel phrases may be those that will help you overcome language barriers. So we want to have you covered in case you have trouble understanding someone or don’t feel too confident speaking Spanish. Just calm down and remember that you’re still learning and that we’re here to help you. The next few expressions are some of the most useful Spanish words for tourists, so pay attention.

1- ¿Hablas inglés?

Translation: “Do you speak English?”

2- No te entiendo.

Translation: “I can’t understand you.”

Girl

3- No lo sé.

Translation: “I don’t know.”

4- ¿Me lo puedes repetir?

Translation: “Could you repeat that?”

5- ¿Puedes hablar más despacio?

Translation: “Could you speak slower?”

6- No hablo español.

Translation: “I don’t speak Spanish.”

7- ¿Cómo se dice esto en español?

Translation: “How do you say this in Spanish?”

8- ¿Cómo se pronuncia esta palabra?

Translation: “How do you pronounce this word?”

9- Escríbelo, por favor.

Translation: “Write it down, please.”

10- ¿Lo puedes deletrear?

Translation: “Could you spell it?”


10. How SpanishPod101.com Can Help You Learn Spanish

Now that we’ve reached the end, we realize you’re probably thinking that these are too many expressions for you to learn straight away. We’re afraid you’re going to have to do some studying, but hey, we promise it’s going to be totally worth it! When you start learning a language, there’s nothing like the feeling of starting to understand and being understood. And we’re sure you see now that the travel phrases in Spanish language learning are so useful!

At SpanishPod101.com, there’s so much more you can learn, no matter what your level is. And now, with our guide of Spanish phrases for travelers and our Don’t Travel Without Knowing These Top 10 Verbs list, you can go anywhere in Spain. Be sure to check out all of our resources, so that you can master the language and culture while having fun!

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How to Use Numbers in Spanish

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Surely you already know how to say a few numbers in Spanish, but have you mastered them? And no, we’re not asking you if you have a PhD in Mathematics.

We’ll probably agree that numbers are an incredibly important part of our lives. Most of us don’t need to do any complicated math on a regular basis, unless that happens to be part of your job description. But we all still use numbers all the time, whether you like them or not. We all look at the clock a few times a day, we go shopping and look at the prices of products…

We all need to count things sometimes as well. We can count our money, or how many cartons of milk we have left, or how many steps there are from the entrance of your house to your room, or maybe how many days there are left until a special occasion.

We don’t need to be experts, but we all need numbers and we all use them. We realize they’re not the most exciting topic when learning a language, but if we all use them when we speak our native language, what makes you think you won’t need them in Spanish?

Curled

In today’s article, we’re going to teach you everything you need to know about using numbers in Spanish, including how to count, write, and pronounce Spanish numbers from 1 to 100 and higher!

Table of Contents

  1. Saying Numbers
  2. Giving Your Phone Number
  3. Saying Prices and Shopping
  4. Telling the Time
  5. Saying Dates
  6. Basic Math
  7. How SpanishPod101.com Can Help You Learn More Spanish

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1. Saying Numbers

Spanish Numbers

  • Numbers 0-9

Let’s start with the basics. Normally one of the first things you learn in Spanish is how to count from 0 to 10, so you might already know this, but we’ll show it here just in case. (They are, after all, some of the most important numbers in learning Spanish!)

  • 0 - cero
  • 1 - uno (or un if it’s in front of a noun, because it becomes an article, for example: un perro → “a dog” )
  • 2 - dos
  • 3 - tres
  • 4 - cuatro
  • 5 - cinco
  • 6 - seis
  • 7 - siete
  • 8 - ocho
  • 9 - nueve

Little Girl Counting with Her Fingers

  • Numbers 10-99

It’s time to start learning some more numbers. Just so you know, once we reach number 16, numbers start following a clear pattern, even though it might seem confusing at first. This is why first we’ll begin by explaining the hardest one, and then we promise the next numbers will be incredibly easy to understand.

Dieciséis (16) is nothing more than diez y seis (“ten and six”) put together. You might notice it’s not written exactly the same way, but that happens for a reason. Let’s analyze these changes step by step:

  1. Z → C: The first change is the z we had in the word diez that turns into a c in dieciséis, as well as in the words for the following numbers (diecisiete, dieciocho…). Don’t let this confuse you, you’re better than that. In Spanish, the letter c in front of the vowels e and i has the exact same sound as z (which is like the “th” sound in “thanks”), while every other time it would have a k sound.

    Moreover, for other reasons, we don’t use the letter z in front of those two vowels. In this case, what’s the letter that’s after c? That’s right, an i, which means it has the exact same sound as in diez.

  2. Y → I: The second change is another letter changing and it’s very similar to the previous one. In Spanish, the word for “and” is y, so if we wanted to put these words together, it would look like this: diecyséis.

    The combination of the letters c + y is extremely uncommon in Spanish, and in fact, it only exists in a few foreign words such as cyan. That’s why, to make it look more aesthetic, it changes to i.

  3. E → É: And finally, the last change, is one that we’ll only see in a couple more numbers. The reason for this change is based on the rules of Spanish accents. We won’t get too much into it right now, but basically, one of these rules is that words that end in vowel + s, like this one, that are stressed on the last syllable, always have an accent.

    Seis is a short word and only has one syllable, so it doesn’t require one. However, dieciséis is a longer word, so it does need one. Don’t worry too much about it for now; we promise it’s not as hard as it sounds, but now is not the time.

    We said this change happens in two more numbers: these are veintitrés (23) and veintiséis (26). It’s for the exact same reason.

Now that we’ve seen the hardest one, let’s look at the rest of the numbers higher than 16. Do you notice that it’s always ten, or twenty, or thirty, followed by y and another number? This is the pattern we were talking about. With tens and twenties, these words are written together like we saw previously and might show a few changes, but once we reach the thirties, they start being written separately, so it becomes a lot clearer.

  • 10 - diez
  • 11 - once
  • 12 - doce
  • 13 - trece
  • 14 - catorce
  • 15 - quince
  • 16 - dieciséis
  • 17 - diecisiete
  • 18 - dieciocho
  • 19 - diecinueve
  • 20 - veinte
  • 21 - veintiuno
  • 22 - veintidós
  • 23 - veintitrés
  • 24 - veinticuatro
  • 25 - veinticinco
  • 26 - veintiséis
  • 30 - treinta
  • 31 - treinta y uno
  • 32 - treinta y dos
  • 33 - treinta y tres
  • 40 - cuarenta
  • 41 - cuarenta y uno
  • 42 - cuarenta y dos
  • 50 - cincuenta
  • 60 - sesenta
  • 70 - setenta
  • 80 - ochenta
  • 90 - noventa

  • Numbers up to 1000

There are a few things you need to be careful with:

  1. Notice that 100 is cien, but in every other number that follows it changes to ciento and it’s followed by the next number. For example, 101 is ciento uno and 187 would be ciento ochenta y siete.
  2. Unlike in English, hundreds are written in one word. For example, doscientos (one word) = “two hundred” (two words). However, what follows it does work like in English: a space, and then the next number, in the same way it would normally be written. For example, “eight hundred forty-two” would be ochocientos cuarenta y dos in Spanish.
  3. In English, the word “hundred” doesn’t change, whether it’s one-hundred, two-hundred, or four-hundred. This does change a little bit in Spanish: if it’s, for example, 156, we’ll say ciento cincuenta y seis, but if it’s 470, we’ll say cuatrocientos setenta. Do you see what we’re talking about? Instead of ciento, when it’s more than one hundred, we add the letter s at the end to make it plural, so it will be cientos.
  4. Sometimes, the number in front of cientos will be the exact same word we learned in the beginning, such as cuatrocientos (400) or ochocientos (800), but there are others that are a bit irregular. These are setecientos (700) and novecientos (900), that don’t exactly use the words siete (7) and nueve (9). The most different one is quinientos (500), which sounds completely different than cinco (5) and doesn’t even end with cientos. It’s a special one, sorry about that.
  5. The words for hundreds can be masculine or feminine, depending on the noun they’re modifying. For example, if we’re talking about 300 T-shirts, because that’s a feminine word in Spanish, we would say trescientas camisetas, but if we’re talking about 300 dishes, we’ll say trescientos platos. If you’re just counting, because the number isn’t related to any noun, you don’t need to worry about its gender.

Now that we know all this, let’s take a look at the list:

  • 100 - cien
  • 101 - ciento uno
  • 102 - ciento dos
  • 103 - ciento tres
  • 110 - ciento diez
  • 111 - ciento once
  • 135 - ciento treinta y cinco
  • 200 - doscientos
  • 201 - doscientos uno
  • 202 - doscientos dos
  • 300 - trescientos
  • 400 - cuatrocientos
  • 500 - quinientos
  • 600 - seiscientos
  • 700 - setecientos
  • 800 - ochocientos
  • 900 - novecientos
  • 1,000 - mil

  • Thousands and millions

Did you think learning numbers up to 1,000 wasn’t enough? We got you covered. If, on the other hand, you think this is too much for you, don’t worry. Come back when you’re ready.

However, thousands and millions happen to be easier than hundreds, because in this case they do work exactly like in English: number + mil (“thousand”) or millón (“million”).

There’s only one thing you need to keep in mind for now: In Spanish, big numbers are broken up with dots, instead of commas. In the list of numbers below we’ll use the English standard so there’s no confusion, but for example, 2,345,392,203 in Spanish would be written 2.345.392.203.

  • 2,000 - dos mil
  • 2,001 - dos mil uno
  • 2,018 - dos mil dieciocho
  • 2,245 - dos mil doscientos cuarenta y cinco
  • 3,000 - tres mil
  • 10,000 - diez mil
  • 20,000 - veinte mil
  • 44,100 - cuarenta y cuatro mil cien
  • 1,000,000 - un millón (Note that here we do need the word un in front of millón)
  • 2,000,000 - dos millones
  • 4,023,150 - cuatro millones veintitrés mil ciento cincuenta

We could keep going, but we won’t, because we need to tell you something more important. We apologize in advance, because this might be confusing, but unfortunately, an American “one billion” isn’t equivalent to a Spanish un billón. Yes, we mean exactly what you just read. Let’s be a little bit more specific:

  • 1,000,000,000 = mil millones or un millardo = “one billion”
  • 1,000,000,000,000 = un billón = “one trillion”

We’re sure you’re already hoping you never have to refer to these numbers in Spanish, but here’s a specific example: in English, you would say that in the world there are over 7-billion people. However, in Spanish, you would have to say there are over siete mil millones.

  • Ordinal Numbers

When it comes to ordinal numbers, writing abbreviations is really easy, because they don’t change from number to number like they do in English. All you need to do is write whatever number you need followed by o if it refers to something or someone masculine, or a if it has a feminine reference.

For example, in an address, if you want to express that you live on the third floor, in the second apartment, you would need to write: 3o 2a. The first one refers to el piso (“floor”) and the second one to la casa (“house,” but it refers to the apartment).

  • 1st - primero / primera
  • 2nd - segundo / segunda
  • 3rd - tercero / tercera
  • 4th - cuarto / cuarta
  • 5th - quinto / quinta
  • 6th - sexto / sexto
  • 7th - séptimo / séptima
  • 8th - octavo / octava
  • 9th - noveno / novena
  • 10th - décimo / décima

Following the previous example, 3o 2a would be spelled tercero segunda.


2. Giving Your Phone Number

When giving a phone number in Spanish, there are a few different ways you can express these numbers. This shouldn’t come as a surprise, because we’re sure it happens in most languages. You can say them number by number, or two numbers at a time, or three. Because we’re only getting started here, we recommend saying it number by number.

Example:
A: ¿Me puedes dar tu número de teléfono?
B: Claro. Mi número es 612 934 213 (seis uno dos, nueve tres cuatro, dos uno tres).

Translation:
A: “Could you give me your phone number?”
B: “Of course. My number is 612 934 213.”


3. Saying Prices and Shopping

Japanese

In Spanish, decimal numbers are expressed with a comma instead of a dot, so we wouldn’t write or pronounce 2.7 (two point seven), but 2,7 (dos coma siete: “two comma seven”). In prices, even though we write it, we generally don’t pronounce the word coma.

When shopping in Spain, remember that our currency is euros, like in most European countries. You might notice in the following examples that we always place the € symbol after the number. In the examples below we’ve also expressed two different ways of saying numbers in prices, and they are both equally correct.

Between euros and cents it’s optional to say con, which means “with.” To give you a literal translation in English, it would be, for example, “two euros with fifty [cents]).” Moreover, you have the option of indicating the name of the currency, which in this case is euros, or just ignoring it.

The same thing goes for the word for “cents,” which is céntimos. Pay attention to the examples. In bold, we’ve marked all the optional words.

Example:
A: Disculpa, ¿cuánto cuesta esta libreta?
B: Cuesta 1,50 € (uno [con] cincuenta or un euro [con] cincuenta [céntimos]).

Translation:
A: “Excuse me, how much does this notebook cost?”
B: “It costs €1.50.”

Example:
A: ¿Cuánto es?
B: Son 56,78 € (cincuenta y seis [con] setenta y ocho or cincuenta y seis euros [con] setenta y ocho [céntimos]).

Translation:
A: “How much is it?”
B: “It’s €56.78.”


4. Telling the Time

There are a few noticeable differences between telling the time in Spanish and in English. For example, you’ll probably find that in the following list, all phrases begin with la or las. In case you don’t know that yet, la is an article that means “the.” To be a little more specific, it’s a feminine article. It’s not that time is feminine or anything, even though the word hora, which means “time,” is feminine, but when we need to say what time it is in Spanish, we’ll always use a feminine article.

Because Spanish is a pro-drop language (which means we tend to not use the subject when speaking), we don’t need to start the sentence with a pronoun like in English (“It’s half past five”). We can start with the verb ser in its right conjugation (don’t be scared, it’s actually easy) or directly with the article we just mentioned, followed by the time.

1:00 → La una [en punto]
One o’clock
2:00 → Las dos [en punto]
Two o’clock
10:05 → Las diez y cinco
Five past ten
2:10 → Las dos y diez
Ten past two
7:15 → Las siete y cuarto
Quarter past seven
4:30 → Las cuatro y media
Half past four
7:45 → Las ocho menos cuarto
Quarter to eight
11:53 → Las doce menos siete
Seven to twelve
2:55 → Las tres menos cinco
Five to three

Man Pointing at Watch

Example:
A: ¿Qué hora es?
B: (Son) las dos menos cuarto.

Translation:
A: “What time is it?”
B: “It’s a quarter to two.”

If you want to learn more about telling the time, check out our How to Tell Time in Spanish video lesson.


5. Saying Dates

Notice that in Spanish, just like in most languages (and unlike in American English), we express first the day and then the month. Another difference is that we don’t normally use ordinal numbers, even though it’s still an option; if we want to refer to April 3, we will say tres de abril instead of tercero de abril.

As you might have already realized and as we’ll see in the following examples, months and days of the week in Spanish aren’t spelled in capital letters like they are in English. If you don’t know months in Spanish yet, you can find them in our vocabulary list Talking about Months in Spanish, and for other vocabulary related to the days of the week, Talking about Days.

Example:
A: ¿Qué día es hoy?
B: (Es) miércoles dos de mayo.

Translation:
A: “What day is it today?”
B: “It’s Wednesday, May the 2nd.”

Example:
A: ¿Cuándo es tu cumpleaños?
B: (Es) el dieciséis de noviembre.

Translation:
A: “When is your birthday?”
B: “It’s on November the 16th.”


6. Basic Math

Luckily, these things don’t change from language to language. Could you imagine if sums were different in other languages? That would be chaos. The only thing that changes is the way we express them, both the calculation and the result.

Student Struggling with Math

1- Sumas

Example:
2 + 3 = 5
Dos más tres son cinco
“Two plus three is five”

Translation:
Dos más tres es igual a cinco
“Two plus three is equal to five”

2- Restas

Example:
10 - 4 = 6
Diez menos cuatro son seis
“Ten minus four is six”

Translation:
Diez menos cuatro es igual a seis
“Ten minus four is equal to six”

If you happen to be a big Math fan and you’re interested in learning some more Math in Spanish, check out our Top 10 Must Know Math Words in Spanish video lesson.


7. How SpanishPod101.com Can Help You Learn More Spanish

In your language-learning, Spanish numbers are one of the most important topics you’ll need to learn and memorize. Aside from counting and other uses we mentioned above, you can even use Spanish numbers to learn Spanish pronunciation.

Now that you know all numbers in Spanish and how to use them in the most common situations, you’re not going to stop there, right? There’s so much more you can learn at SpanishPod101.com, if you give us a chance. Check out our lessons, podcasts, articles, and vocabulary lists to learn everything you need and more to become fluent in Spanish, the second-most natively spoken language, after Chinese.

If you’re interested in learning even more numbers, check out our list of Spanish Numbers. Numbers are the same in Spain and Mexico and only show differences in pronunciation, so feel free to take a look at that list even if you’re learning Spanish from Spain.

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How to Say “Sorry” in Spanish

There are many reasons why it’s important to be able to say “sorry” in Spanish, or any other language you’re learning. It’s one of the first things you learn when you start learning a language, and we’re sure you know why. Not only is it useful; it also shows manners, and those are important to have no matter where you are. That said, you’ll be glad that you learned how to say sorry in Spanish culture!

Here’s an example: Let’s say you’re on a trip to Spain, you’re walking down the street, and you accidentally bump into someone. They might not know you’re a tourist who doesn’t speak much Spanish, so you have two options here: you could choose not to say anything and look like the bad guy, or you could apologize and show how polite you are.

Girl Asking to be Forgiven

This is only one example of where you would need to say that you’re sorry in Spanish on a simple short trip to Spain, but if you’re planning on a longer trip—or on moving there—you’ll soon start to make Spanish-speaking friends. Even if you’re a friendly person, there are many situations where your friends might require an apology. You could forget their birthday, or you could…step on their dog’s tail by accident? Or what if you meet a special someone and you forget an important date? Anything could happen.

As you can see, the list could go on and on. We all make mistakes sometimes, and because we’re sure you’re a good person, we’re going to help you learn a few different ways to say “sorry” in the Spanish language, and how and when you should use each of them. Start with a bonus, and download your FREE cheat sheet - How to Improve Your Spanish Skills! (Logged-In Member Only)

  1. Nine Ways of Saying “Sorry” in Spanish
  2. Four other Sentences You Might Use to Apologize:
  3. Six Different Answers You Might Get after Apologizing:
  4. How SpanishPod101.com can Help You Learn Spanish

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1. Nine Ways of Saying “Sorry” in Spanish

1- Perdón

When learning how to say “sorry” in the Spanish language, one of the first words you need to know is perdón. Perdón is the most common way of saying “sorry,” and this also happens to be the Spanish word for “forgiveness”. We don’t consider this word to be formal or informal, because this word can be used in different contexts. But do keep in mind that it’s always used in minor incidents such as the situation in the example below.

Example: Perdón, creo que he cogido tu lápiz sin querer.
Translation: “Sorry, I think I unintentionally grabbed your pencil.”

Another situation when you could apologize using the word perdón would be the first example we mentioned before, which is if you bump into someone by accident.

2- Lo siento

Lo siento is another common way to apologize in Spanish, and is usually the first one you learn when starting to learn Spanish, because it’s not as limited in meaning as the word perdón. It literally means “I feel it” and it translates to “I’m sorry.”

It can be used in a much wider sense than the word perdón: You can use it for both minor and major incidents. For example, it can be used to offer your condolences after your friend broke up with someone, or after someone has been fired.

This one has a few simple variations: If you’re not just sorry, but very sorry, you say: Lo siento mucho. You use a third version, Lo siento muchísimo, if you’re very, very sorry.

Example: Marta, lo siento mucho, me acabo de enterar de lo de tu padre.
Translation: “I’m so sorry, Marta, I just heard about your father.”

There’s still one last very common variation of this phrase, which consists of forming a sentence that starts with siento, still meaning “I’m sorry,” followed by the action or situation you’re sorry for. Don’t worry, we’ll give you an example of this one too.

Example: Siento que hayas tenido que pasar por esto.
Translation: “I’m sorry you had to go through this.”

3- Lo lamento

This phrase is very similar to Lo siento, but it’s generally used either when you regret something or in sad situations, such as when offering your condolences. Lo lamento is, by far, not as commonly used as Lo siento, so there’s no need to worry about memorizing this one right away.

Example: Me he pasado con esta broma. Lo lamento.
Translation: “I went too far with this prank. I’m so sorry.”

4- Perdona

Perdona is another very common word in Spanish, and it translates to “excuse me.” Some people say that all waiters and waitresses are actually called “Perdona,” as that’s what one commonly uses to call them. You should also use this word if you want to ask a stranger for directions.

Example: Perdona, ¿me puedes pasar la sal?
Translation: “Excuse me, could you pass me the salt?”

5- Perdone (formal)

Perdone is basically the formal version of perdona, because it follows the conjugation of the form usted, instead of (the common “you”). If you don’t know much Spanish yet, don’t worry about it, as it’s not that common anymore and it’s very likely you’ll never have to use it. We’ll use the same example we used with the form perdona, but translated to “pardon” so the difference is more obvious. Also notice that the main verb of the question also changes from puedes to puede.

Example: Perdone, ¿me puede pasar la sal?
Translation: “Pardon, would you mind passing the salt?”

6- Perdóname

This one might sound similar to the previous two words in the list, but it actually has a different meaning, which is “forgive me.” You can also say perdona when you mean to say “forgive me,” but not the other way around; so you don’t say perdóname when you mean to say just a casual “excuse me.”

Example: Perdóname, no pretendía hacerte daño.
Translation: “Forgive me, I didn’t mean to hurt you.”

7- Disculpa or discúlpame

This word, disculpa, has the exact same meaning as perdona, but it’s slightly more polite. While you can use perdona in all situations, this word is more limited in use. For example, a young person doesn’t usually say disculpa to friends or family, but rather when addressing a stranger, a teacher, or a boss.

While perdona and perdóname don’t always have the same meaning, disculpa and discúlpame are completely interchangeable.

Example: Disculpa/discúlpame, se te han caído las llaves.
Translation: “Excuse me, you dropped your keys.”

Handshake

8- Disculpe (formal)

Similar to the difference between perdona and perdone, disculpe is the formal version of disculpa. It can be translated to “pardon” or “I beg your pardon.” We’ll use the same example as we did with disculpa, with a couple of changes to make the difference more obvious.

Example: Disculpe, señor, se le han caído las llaves.
Translation: “Pardon, sir, you dropped your keys.”

9- Mi más sentido pésame

Looking for how to say “sorry for your loss” in Spanish? This last phrase can only be used during funerals or when offering your condolences. As we mentioned previously, you can also use Lo siento or Lo lamento, but this one is much more specific and standard.

Example: Tu padre era un gran hombre. Mi más sentido pésame.
Translation: “Your father was a great man. My deepest condolences.”


2. Four other Sentences You Might Use to Apologize:

3 Ways to Say Sorry

When you truly want to apologize to someone, you don’t just say “sorry” and leave, right? In situations like this, you’ll want to know other sentences that might be useful someday if you need to apologize to someone in Spanish. As opposed to the previous list, these phrases are pretty easy to translate into English and their meanings, once you understand them, will make perfect sense. Don’t worry, we’re going to give you examples of every single one. Here’s our shortlist of helpful phrases regarding how to say “sorry” in Spanish culture.

Girl Saying Sorry

1- No era mi intención (“It was not my intention”)

Example: Siento haberte hecho daño. No era mi intención.
Translation: “I’m sorry I hurt you. It was not my intention.”

2- No lo volveré a hacer (“I won’t do it again”)

Example: Perdón por comerme tu bocadillo. No lo volveré a hacer.
Translation: “I’m sorry I ate your sandwich. I won’t do it again.”

3- No volverá a pasar/ocurrir (“It won’t happen again”)

Example: Sé que he cometido un error, pero no volverá a ocurrir.
Translation: “I know I made a mistake, but it won’t happen again.”

4- No debería haberlo hecho (“I shouldn’t have done it”)

Example: Creía que estaba haciendo lo correcto, pero estaba equivocado. No debería haberlo hecho.
Translation: “I thought I was doing the right thing, but I was wrong. I shouldn’t have done it.”


3. Six Different Answers You Might Get after Apologizing:

Saying Sorry

Just like in English, there are a few different ways of accepting an apology in Spanish. In Spanish, there are only a few of these responses and they’re pretty simple to understand, as they all have a direct translation to English and a very clear meaning, so once again, they don’t require an explanation.

It’s Ok

1- No te preocupes (“Don’t worry”)

Example: A: ¿Te he pisado? ¡Perdón!
B: No te preocupes, ni lo he notado.
Translation: A: “Did I step on you? I’m sorry!”
B: “Don’t worry, I didn’t even feel it.”

2- No pasa nada (“It’s nothing”)

Example: A: Ay, lo siento, he vertido un poco de agua.
B: No pasa nada, voy a por un trapo.
Translation: A: “Oh, I’m sorry, I dropped a bit of water.”
B: “It’s nothing, I’ll go get a cloth.”

3- No importa (“It doesn’t matter”)

Example: A: ¿Ayer fue tu cumpleaños? Perdóname, ¡se me olvidó!
B: No importa.
Translation: A: “Your birthday was yesterday? Forgive me, I forgot!”
B: “It doesn’t matter.”

4- Te perdono (“I forgive you”)

Example: A: Lo siento, mamá, he roto una taza. ¿Me perdonas?
B: Claro que te perdono.
Translation: A: “I’m sorry, Mom, I broke a cup. Can you forgive me?”
B: “Of course I forgive you.”

Broken Cup

5- Gracias (“Thanks”)

Example: A: Mi más sentido pésame.
B: Gracias.
Translation: A: “I’m sorry for your loss.”
B: “Thanks.”

6- No es culpa tuya (“It’s not your fault”)

Example: A: Lo siento mucho, pero no puedo ir esta noche, mi padre está enfermo.
B: No es culpa tuya, ya nos veremos en otro momento.
Translation: A: “I’m so sorry, but I can’t go tonight, my dad is sick.”
B: “It’s not your fault, I’ll see you some other time.”


4. How SpanishPod101.com can Help You Learn Spanish

Now you know how to say “sorry” in Spain, but what if you wanted to visit Mexico? You can click on the following link to learn Common Ways to Say Sorry in Mexican Spanish. You’ll see that some of these sentences are the same, or very similar, but you might learn some interesting new ones!

If you’re not sure how to pronounce some of these words, you can check out SpanishPod101.com’s guide on Spanish Pronunciation.

At SpanishPod101.com, you’ll find everything you need to learn Spanish. For example, if you follow this link, you’ll find hundreds of different useful vocabulary lists in Spanish. But hey, that’s not all! We have all the resources you need to become fluent in the language and knowledgeable in the culture. Just visit our website, explore, and learn!

We hope this article on how to say “sorry” in the Spanish language was helpful to you. Continue practicing, and it won’t be long until you master the art of how to say “sorry” in Spanish culture. Best of luck!

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How to Find a Job in Spain

One of the most common reasons to start learning a language is the motivation of moving to a different country and working there. Today at SpanishPod101.com, we’re going to talk about why you should consider moving to Spain and how to find a job there, as well as teach you a few basic facts, such as how to say “job” in Spanish, and more.

We’re not going to lie: In the past, getting a job in Spain hasn’t been as easy as we’d have liked. However, we have good news. The situation has actually been improving over the past two years. According to Trading Economics, in July 2018, the general unemployment rate in Spain was 15.3%. It sounds bad, but compare it to the rate in 2015 and 2016, which was around 21%. Definitely some improvement there.

There’s no need to worry about any of this right now, even if you’re not fluent in Spanish or don’t speak it too well yet. And to show you that it’s possible to find a job in Spain, we’re going to tell you everything you need to know if you want to work here, including how to the find the best foreigners-friendly jobs in Spain.

Start with a bonus, and download the Business Words & Phrases PDF for FREE! (Logged-In Member Only)

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Table of Contents

  1. Five Reasons Why You Should Move to Spain
  2. What You Need to Know Before Applying for Jobs
  3. How SpanishPod101.com Can Help You Find a Job in Spain

1. Five Reasons Why You Should Move to Spain

Just in case you’re not convinced yet, we thought we’d give you a few reasons to relocate to Spain. We think you’re going to like them.

Park Güell in Barcelona

1- The Food

Surely you’ve heard about Spanish food before, and probably even tried some. Paella, churros, gazpacho, jamón…these are just a few examples of the amazing food we have in Spain. So, why not live there so that you can eat it all the time?

2- The People

Spanish people are widely known for being friendly. If you’ve ever visited our country, you’ll know this is true. Everyone is welcoming and open-minded (as long as we’ve had our siesta after lunch). And if you love a good party, you’ve come to the right place. There’s nothing like the local fiestas that take place in each town at least once a year. Trust us, you’ll hear about them once you’re there.

3- The Cost of Living

Spain is so much cheaper to live in than a lot of other European countries. The most expensive Spanish cities are Barcelona, San Sebastián, and Madrid, and if you check a list of the most expensive cities in Europe, you’ll see they’re around the 50th position, so they’re pretty great compared to most of the nearest countries.

4- The Healthcare System

Every legal immigrant working in Spain has access to the public healthcare system as soon as they register for an NIE, which basically serves as your personal ID. As a Spaniard who has traveled a lot, this is definitely one of the best healthcare systems I have come across in my life.

5- We have Everything You’re Looking for

Basically, everything you need in your ideal city, you can find here. Do you want city? Check. Do you want beach? Check. Do you want mountains? Check. Sometimes you might even find all these things in one place, so just be sure to choose the right location for you.

There are many more reasons to convince you to move to Spain immediately, but I’ll leave them to you to find out when you arrive. That said, I think you see that there are many benefits of working in Spain that you won’t want to miss out on.

2. What You Need to Know Before Applying for Jobs

Now that you know why moving to Spain is a good idea, it’s time to help you find a job. To get you started, you should know that the word for “job” in Spanish is trabajo, empleo, or, in more informal contexts, curro. Two of these words have their respective verbal forms: trabajar and currar (“to work”). Again, currar is way more informal than trabajar, but both are widely used. Now that you know this, let’s get you a curro!

1- Spanish CV Tips

The first thing you should do before starting to apply for jobs is to write your new Spanish CV. Most resumes and CVs are similar in different countries, but there are always a few differences, so we recommend starting a new one from scratch. Here are some things you should keep in mind:

Writing a Resume

Include a photo

In a Spanish CV, it’s important that you include a professional photo of yourself. You can use the same photo you use for your passport or your driver’s license.

What language should you write it in?

Ideally, your CV should be written in Spanish. However, if you’re applying for a job that doesn’t require it or are looking for jobs for non-Spanish speakers in Spain, you can submit it in English.

Your personal information

The first part of your CV should include your basic personal information: name, last name, date of birth, address, email address, and phone number. It’s also common to include your marital status, but it’s not compulsory.

Your studies

The next section can either be about your education or your work experience, as the order isn’t too important here. You should list your studies in reverse-chronological order, starting with the most recent, including the institution and the location. You can choose to include the dates you started and finished each of them, but it’s not necessary. It’s up to you, really. If you can, you should include the equivalent of your qualifications to Spanish education.

Your work experience

As we said in the previous section, you can choose this section to be either about your education or your work experience. So if you listed your studies in the previous section, now it’s time to show your future employers what your past work experience is. You should also list them reverse-chronologically and starting with your most recent position. In this case, it’s common to include the dates. You don’t need to write anything about that position, unlike in some other countries. All you really need are the dates, your position in the company, the name of the company, and its location.

Languages

You should include a section listing the language or languages you speak, and your level of fluency. If your Spanish isn’t great or you don’t speak it (yet!), you should focus on the other languages you do speak.

Hobbies

This one is optional and might not be as common in other countries, but it’s really frequent in Spain to list some of the things you enjoy doing in your free time. For example, if you enjoy hiking or listening to music. This last section of your CV is also where you let them know if you have a driver’s license.

2- Six Most Common Job-Seeking Platforms to Find a Job in Spain

Finding a Job in Spain

Once you’ve completed your CV and your cover letter, you can start spreading them around. There are two basic ways of applying for jobs in Spain: using job-seeking platforms or giving CVs in person. Of course, nowadays everything is online, so it’s getting more and more common to only apply for jobs through these platforms. The only problem is that most of these sites are only in Spanish, so you’ll need to know at least a little bit of Spanish. Here are the most popular Spanish job hunting sites:

Infojobs

Infojobs is definitely the most-used website for finding jobs in Spain, and the one that everyone would recommend.

Infoempleo

This website, Infoempleo, is the second most-used Spanish job seeking website and we highly recommend it.

Primer Empleo

The name of this platform, Primer Empleo, means “First Job.” It’s not exclusive to people who have never had a job before, but it’s mostly focused on jobs for students or those who don’t have too much experience.

Empléate

This is the Government of Spain’s official website for finding a job and, to be honest, it’s not as commonly used as the previous websites we mentioned. However, it’s still safe and worth considering as a Spanish job-finding website.

LinkedIn

You probably already know LinkedIn, but if you don’t, we recommend you check it out. Basically, it’s a social network for employers and workers to create professional connections all over the world, and it’s also highly used in Spain.

European Language Jobs

Just like LinkedIn, this one isn’t an exclusive Spanish website, but it might actually be the most useful for non-Spanish speakers. They post job offers for speakers of different languages in various European cities. If you click on the link to the website, you’ll find all the current job offers in Spain, so all you need to do is find your language.

3- Easiest Jobs for Non-Spanish Speakers

As we mentioned before, and you probably already guessed, there are some jobs that require you to speak Spanish, but there are some others that might be easy for Spanish beginners. On the website we were just talking about, European Language Jobs, you’ll find offers for jobs that require knowledge of and fluency in languages other than Spanish. It’s definitely not the only website where you can find non-Spanish speaking jobs in Spain, so just be sure to do some research!

Here are some other options that foreigners finding jobs in Spain can try out to begin with:

Language teacher

Are there people who are interested in learning your mother tongue? If so, you already have a possible job in Spain. If you don’t feel comfortable enough to fully teach your native language, you can still offer conversation-based lessons, which is an option many language-learners choose, especially in advanced stages.

Tourism

In the most-visited cities, you’ll easily be able to work in the tourism industry, as they’re always looking for people who speak foreign languages. Of course, speaking Spanish is still desirable, but in certain positions, your native language might be more important.

Office jobs

Not every kind of office work will be suitable for a non-Spanish speaker in Spain, but you can certainly find some. They’ll mostly be foreign-based companies that also have an office in Spain.

4- Five Common Interview Questions in Spain

Once you’ve applied for jobs, it’s time to do some interviews. In a job interview in Spain, a lot of the questions you’ll be asked are about yourself, and not just about your work experience and qualifications. Here are five examples of questions you’re most likely to be asked, in Spanish, and followed by their translation in English.

Háblame un poco de ti. — “Tell me a little bit about yourself.”
The first question on our list isn’t actually a question, but it’s definitely something you’ll hear in an interview. To answer it, you should briefly explain your work experience and studies. You can also explain why you decided to move to Spain, if you think that might interest them.

¿Dónde te ves en cinco años? — “Where do you see yourself in five years?”
What the interviewer wants to know is whether your plans for the future match their plans for you. If you tell them you’re only thinking of working in Spain for a short period of time, they might not be as interested in you as they would be if they knew you’re planning on staying there for a long, long time.

¿Cuál es tu mayor virtud? — “What is your best quality?”
This question might differ a little. They could ask you about only your best quality, or about your three best qualities, for example. When answering this, you need to be realistic and tell them about a skill you know will make a good difference in the position you’re being interviewed for. Before going to your interview, think a little bit about what you’ll say.

¿Cuál es tu mayor defecto? — “What is your worst quality?”
This one is also a hard question. You obviously want to look good even after answering this question, but we recommend you don’t answer with something like “I’m too much of a perfectionist,” because even if you are, they won’t believe you. Just like in the previous question, you need to think about the right answer for this question and be realistic. You could mention something that’s been hard for you in the past, but that you’ve been working on to improve, and give specific examples for it if you can. To give you an example, a good answer would be that you used to be slightly unpunctual, but for the past few years you’ve been paying much more attention to it and are always on time now.

¿Por qué deberíamos contratarte? — “Why should we hire you?”
This one isn’t as common as the other four questions, but it’s still an important one and you should know how to answer. Your answer will depend on the kind of work that you’ll be doing, but obviously it should be focused on everything you can contribute to the team.

Job Interview in Spain

5- Full-time and Part-time Jobs

In Spain, both full-time and part-time jobs are equally frequent to find on the main job-seeking platforms. A common full-time job in Spain, or trabajo a tiempo completo, has an average of nearly 40 hours per week.

However, if you get a part-time job, or trabajo a tiempo parcial, you’ll generally work about six hours a day.

Both types of jobs offer you the same rights as a worker. This means that if you get a part-time job, no matter how many hours you work, you’ll still have full free access to the public healthcare system, for example. This makes working in Spain quite convenient in terms of healthcare, and we should all know how important that is.

6- Working Visas for Non-EU/EEA or Switzerland Citizens

Getting a Spanish Work Visa

If your passport says you’re from a country in the EU or EEA, or from Switzerland, you don’t need to worry about getting a visa; you can just fly to Spain and start working. It’s as simple as that. However, if you’re from any other country, you’ll need a valid working visa, and that does require some paperwork. Here, we’ll go into a little detail on the visa requirements to work in Spain.

You cannot apply for this visa directly, so in order to get it, you’ll need to find a job first, and then your employer will have to start doing the procedures for you so that you can receive a Work and Residence Permit. Once you have this permit, you can apply for a Work Visa. Your employer in Spain should be able to help you with this whole process, but if they can’t, don’t hesitate to contact your nearest Spanish Embassy or Consulate.

7- Minimum Salary

The minimum salary in Spain was raised to €735.90 per month or €24.53 per day in 2018 from the €707.60 per month or €23.59 per day that was in place in 2017. In 2016, the minimum monthly salary was €655.20 and it had been growing really slowly over the last ten years, so this is a great time to relocate to Spain.

We realize it might not seem like too much, but remember this is only the minimum salary, so you’ll be making more money if you get a job with higher qualifications. You must also keep in mind that the cost of living is way cheaper than in most European countries, as we said previously in this article.

8- Something Else You Should Know

Just like everywhere else, to find a job in Spain, it’s important that you have qualifications, experience, confidence, and possibly speak more than one language.

In case you didn’t know, Spanish isn’t the only language spoken in Spain. There are a few regions in Spain that have co-official languages. If you go to cities like Barcelona, Valencia, Santiago de Compostela, or Bilbao, among others, you’ll hear languages other than Spanish, and we’re not just referring to the tourists. When applying for a job, speaking these regional languages is considered a positive trait, but normally they’re only required in public administration jobs.

3. How SpanishPod101.com Can Help You Find a Job in Spain

At SpanishPod101.com, you’ll find everything you need to learn Spanish, whether you’re just getting started or are at a more advanced level.

If your dream is to live and work in Spain, we’re sure you already know that you should learn some Spanish before moving there. Like we mentioned before, you can still get a job if you’re not fluent or if you don’t speak too much Spanish, but your options will be much more limited, so you know what to do!

Check out SpanishPod101.com’s vocabulary lists, such as the Top 15 Spanish Questions You Should Know for Conversations, or some useful learning tips like Top Ways to Practice Your Spanish Reading Skills.

We hope this article provided you with all the info you need about working and living in Spain. Thanks for reading, and best of luck with all of your Spanish job-hunting endeavors!

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How to Say I Love You in Spanish - Romantic Word List

Do you often feel lonely and sad? Do you long for romance and are willing to do whatever it takes to meet that special person? Speaking another language could revolutionize your love life! So, why wait? Learning how to say ‘love’ in Spanish could be just what you need to find it.

Or perhaps you were lucky, and have found your Spanish partner already. Fantastic! Yet, a cross-cultural relationship comes with unique challenges. Learning how to speak your lover’s language will greatly improve your communication and enhance the relationship. At SpanishPod101, our team will teach you all the words, quotes and phrases you need to woo your Spanish lover with excellence! Our tutors provide personal assistance, with plenty of extra material available to make Spanish dating easy for you.

Table of Contents

  1. Common Phrases You’ll Need for a Date
  2. The Most Romantic Ideas for a Date
  3. Must-know Valentine’s Day Vocabulary
  4. Spanish Love Phrases for Valentine’s Day
  5. Spanish Quotes about Love
  6. Marriage Proposal Lines
  7. 15 Most Common Break-Up Lines
  8. Will Falling in Love Help You Learn Spanish Faster?

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1. Common Phrases You’ll Need for a Date

So, you have met your Spanish love interest. Congratulations! Who knows where this could take you…?! However, the two of you have just met and you’re not ready to say the Spanish word for love just yet. Great, it is better to get to know him/her first. Wow your prospective love by using these Spanish date phrases to set up a spectacular first date.

Spanish Date Phrases

Would you like to go out to dinner with me?

  • ¿Te gustaría ir a cenar conmigo?

The important question! In most cultures, this phrase indicates: ‘I’m romantically interested in you’. Flirting in Spanish is no different, so don’t take your date to Mcdonald’s!

Are you free this weekend?

  • ¿Estás libre este fin de semana?

This is a preamble to asking your love interest on a date. If you get an immediate ‘Yes’, that’s good news!

Would you like to hang out with me?

  • ¿Quieres salir conmigo?

You like her/him, but you’re not sure if there’s chemistry. Ask them to hang out first to see if a dinner date is next.

What time shall we meet tomorrow?

  • ¿A qué hora nos vemos mañana?

Set a time, and be sure to arrive early! Nothing spoils a potential relationship more than a tardy date.

Where shall we meet?

  • ¿Donde nos vemos?

You can ask this, but also suggest a place.

You look great.

  • Te ves genial.

A wonderful ice breaker! This phrase will help them relax a bit - they probably took great care to look their best just for you.

You are so cute.

  • Eres tan linda.

If the two of you are getting on really well, this is a fun, flirtatious phrase to use.

What do you think of this place?

  • ¿Qué opinas de este lugar?

This another good conversation starter. Show off your Spanish language skills!

Can I see you again?

  • ¿Puedo verte de nuevo?

So the date went really well - don’t waste time! Make sure you will see each other again.

Shall we go somewhere else?

  • ¿Vamos a otro lugar?

If the place you meet at is not great, you can suggest going elsewhere. It is also a good question to follow the previous one. Variety is the spice of life!

I know a good place.

  • Conozco un buen lugar.

Use this with the previous question. However, don’t say if you don’t know a good place!

I will drive you home.

  • Voy a llevarte a tu casa.

If your date doesn’t have transport, this is a polite, considerate offer. However, don’t be offended if she/he turns you down on the first date. Especially a woman might not feel comfortable letting you drive her home when the two of you are still basically strangers.

That was a great evening.

  • Fue una gran noche.

This is a good phrase to end the evening with.

When can I see you again?

  • ¿Cuándo puedo volver a verte?

If he/she replied ‘Yes’ to ‘Can I see you again?’, this is the next important question.

I’ll call you.

  • Te llamaré.

Say this only if you really mean to do it. In many cultures, this could imply that you’re keeping the proverbial backdoor open.

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2. The Most Romantic Ideas for a Date

You learned all the Spanish phrases to make a date - congratulations! Now you have to decide where to meet, which can be tricky. Discuss these options with your lover to gauge whether you like the same things. Check out romantic date ideas in Spanish below!

Date Ideas in Spanish

museum

  • museo

If you’re looking for unique date ideas that are fun but won’t break the bank, museums are the perfect spot! You won’t be running out of things to say in the conversations.

candlelit dinner

  • cena con velas

A candlelit dinner is perhaps best to reserve for when the relationship is getting serious. It’s very intimate, and says: “Romance!” It’s a fantastic choice if you’re sure you and your date are in love with each other!

go to the zoo

  • ir al zoológico

This is a good choice for shy lovers who want to get the conversation going. Just make sure your date likes zoos, as some people dislike them. Maybe not for the first date, but this is also a great choice if your lover has children - you’ll win his/her adoration for inviting them along!

go for a long walk

  • dar un largo paseo

Need to talk about serious stuff, or just want to relax with your date? Walking together is soothing, and a habit you can keep up together always! Just make sure it’s a beautiful walk that’s not too strenuous.

go to the opera

  • ir a la ópera

This type of date should only be attempted if both of you love the opera. It can be a special treat, followed by a candlelit dinner!

go to the aquarium

  • ir al acuario

Going to the aquarium is another good idea if you need topics for conversation, or if you need to impress your lover’s kids! Make sure your date doesn’t have a problem with aquariums.

walk on the beach

  • caminar en la playa

This can be a very romantic stroll, especially at night! The sea is often associated with romance and beauty.

have a picnic

  • tener un picnic

If you and your date need to get more comfortable together, this can be a fantastic date. Spending time in nature is soothing and calms the nerves.

cook a meal together

  • cocinar una comida juntos

If you want to get an idea of your date’s true character in one go, this is an excellent date! You will quickly see if the two of you can work together in a confined space. If it works, it will be fantastic for the relationship and create a sense of intimacy. If not, you will probably part ways!

have dinner and see a movie

  • cenar y ver una película

This is traditional date choice works perfectly well. Just make sure you and your date like the same kind of movies!

3. Must-know Valentine’s Day Vocabulary

Valentine's Day Words in Spanish

Expressing your feelings honestly is very important in any relationship all year round. Yet, on Valentine’s Day you really want to shine. Impress your lover this Valentine’s with your excellent vocabulary, and make his/her day! We teach you, in fun, effective ways, the meanings of the words and how to pronounce them. You can also copy the characters and learn how to write ‘I love you’ in Spanish - think how impressed your date will be!

4. Spanish Love Phrases for Valentine’s Day

So, you now have the basic Valentine’s Day vocabulary under your belt. Well done! But, do you know how to say ‘I love you’ in Spanish yet? Or perhaps you are still only friends. So, do you know how to say ‘I like you’ or ‘I have a crush on you’ in Spanish? No? Don’t worry, here are all the love phrases you need to bowl over your Spanish love on this special day!

Valentine's Day Words in Spanish

I love you.

  • Te amo.

Saying ‘I love you’ in Spanish carries the same weight as in all languages. Use this only if you’re sure and sincere about your feelings for your partner/friend.

You mean so much to me.

  • Tú quieres decir mucho para mí.

This is a beautiful expression of gratitude that will enhance any relationship! It makes the receiver feel appreciated and their efforts recognized.

Will you be my Valentine?

  • ¿Quieres ser mi Valentín?

With these words, you are taking your relationship to the next level! Or, if you have been a couple for a while, it shows that you still feel the romance. So, go for it!

You’re so beautiful.

  • Eres tan bella.

If you don’t know how to say ‘You’re pretty’ in Spanish, this is a good substitute, gentlemen!

I think of you as more than a friend.

  • Pienso en ti como algo más que un amigo.

Say this if you are not yet sure that your romantic feelings are reciprocated. It is also a safe go-to if you’re unsure about the Spanish dating culture.

A hundred hearts would be too few to carry all my love for you.

  • Cien corazones serían demasiado pocos para contener todo mi amor por ti.

You romantic you…! When your heart overflows with love, this would be the best phrase to use.

Love is just love. It can never be explained.

  • Amor es sólo amor. No puede ser explicado.

If you fell in love unexpectedly or inexplicably, this one’s for you.

You’re so handsome.

  • Eres tan guapo.

Ladies, this phrase lets your Spanish love know how much you appreciate his looks! Don’t be shy to use it; men like compliments too.

I’ve got a crush on you.

  • Me estoy enamorando de ti.

If you like someone, but you’re unsure about starting a relationship, it would be prudent to say this. It simply means that you like someone very, very much and think they’re amazing.

You make me want to be a better man.

  • Me haces querer ser un hombre mejor.

Gentlemen, don’t claim this phrase as your own! It hails from the movie ‘As Good as it Gets’, but it is sure to make your Spanish girlfriend feel very special. Let her know that she inspires you!

Let all that you do be done in love.

  • Que todo lo que hagas sea con amor.

We hope.

You are my sunshine, my love.

  • Tú eres mi rayo de sol, mi amor.

A compliment that lets your lover know they bring a special quality to your life. Really nice!

Words can’t describe my love for you.

  • Las palabras no pueden describir mi amor por ti.

Better say this when you’re feeling serious about the relationship! It means that your feelings are very intense.

We were meant to be together.

  • Estámos destinados a estar juntos.

This is a loving affirmation that shows you see a future together, and that you feel a special bond with your partner.

If you were thinking about someone while reading this, you’re definitely in love.

  • Si estabas pensando en alguien mientras leías esto, definitivamente estás enamorado.

Here’s something fun to tease your lover with. And hope he/she was thinking of you!

5. Spanish Quotes about Love

Spanish Love Quotes

You’re a love champ! You and your Spanish lover are getting along fantastically, your dates are awesome, your Valentine’s Day together was spectacular, and you’re very much in love. Good for you! Here are some beautiful phrases of endearment in Spanish that will remind him/her who is in your thoughts all the time.

6. Marriage Proposal Lines

Spanish Marriage Proposal Lines

Wow. Your Spanish lover is indeed the love of your life - congratulations! And may only happiness follow the two of you! In most traditions, the man asks the woman to marry; this is also the Spanish custom. Here are a few sincere and romantic lines that will help you to ask your lady-love for her hand in marriage.

7. 15 Most Common Break-Up Lines

Spanish Break-Up Lines

Instead of moving towards marriage or a long-term relationship, you find that the spark is not there for you. That is a pity! But even though breaking up is never easy, continuing a bad or unfulfilling relationship would be even harder. Remember to be kind to the person you are going to say goodbye to; respect and sensitivity cost nothing. Here are some phrases to help you break up gently.

  • I’m not good enough for you.
    • No soy lo suficientemente bueno para ti.

    Say this only if you really believe it, or you’ll end up sounding false. Break-ups are usually hard for the receiving party, so don’t insult him/her with an insincere comment.

    It’s not you. It’s me.

    • No eres tú. Soy yo.

    As long as you mean it, this can be a kind thing to say. It means that there’s nothing wrong with your Spanish lover as a person, but that you need something different from a relationship.

    I’m just not ready for this kind of relationship.

    • No estoy listo para este tipo de relación.

    Things moved a bit fast and got too intense, too soon? Painful as it is, honesty is often the best way to break up with somebody.

    Let’s just be friends.

    • Seamos solo amigos.

    If the relationship was very intense, and you have sent many ‘i love u’ texts in Spanish, this would not be a good breakup line. Feelings need to calm down before you can be friends, if ever. If the relationship has not really developed yet, a friendship would be possible.

    I think we need a break.

    • Creo que necesitamos terminar.

    This is again honest, and to the point. No need to play with someone’s emotions by not letting them know how you feel. However, this could imply that you may fall in love with him/her again after a period of time, so use with discretion.

    You deserve better.

    • Mereces algo mejor.

    Yes, he/she probably deserves a better relationship if your own feelings have cooled down.

    We should start seeing other people.

    • Deberíamos empezar a ver a otras personas.

    This is probably the least gentle break-up phrase, so reserve it for a lover that doesn’t get the message!

    I need my space.

    • Necesito mi espacio.

    When a person is too clingy or demanding, this would be an suitable break-up phrase. It is another good go-to for that lover who doesn’t get the message!

    I think we’re moving too fast.

    • Creo que estamos avanzando muy rápido.

    Say this if you want to keep the relationship, but need to slow down its progress a bit. It is also good if you feel things are getting too intense for your liking. However, it is not really a break-up line, so be careful not to mislead.

    I need to focus on my career.

    • Necesito concentrarme en mi carrera.

    If you feel that you will not be able to give 100% in a relationship due to career demands, this is the phrase to use. It’s also good if you are unwilling to give up your career for a relationship.

    We need to talk.

    • Tenemos que hablar.

    This is not really a break-up line, but it is a good conversation opener with a serious tone.

    I just don’t love you anymore.

    • Ya no te quiero más.

    This harsh line is sometimes the best one to use if you are struggling to get through to a stubborn, clingy lover who won’t accept your break up. Use it as a last resort. Then switch your phone off and block their emails!

    We’re just not right for each other.

    • Simplemente no somos el uno para el otro.

    If this is how you truly feel, you need to say it. Be kind, gentle and polite.

    It’s for the best.

    • Es lo mejor.

    This phrase is called for if circumstances are difficult and the relationship is not progressing well. Love should enhance one’s life, not burden it!

    We’ve grown apart.

    • Nos hemos distanciado.

    Cross-cultural relationships are often long-distance ones, and it is easy to grow apart over time.

  • 8. Will Falling in Love help you Learn Spanish faster?

    Most people will agree that the above statement is a no-brainer - of course it will! Your body will be flooded with feel-good hormones, which are superb motivators for anything. SpanishPod101 is one of the best portals to help help make this a reality, so don’t hesitate to enroll now! Let’s quickly look at the reasons why falling in love will speed up your learning of the Spanish language.

    Three Reasons Why Having a Lover will Help you Learn Spanish Faster!

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    1- Being in a love relationship with your Spanish speaking partner will immerse you in the culture
    SpanishPod101 uses immersive methods and tools to teach you Spanish, but having a relationship with a native speaker will be a very valuable addition to your learning experience! You will gain exposure to their world, realtime and vividly, which will make the language come alive even more for you. The experience is likely to expand your world-view, which should motivate you to learn Spanish even faster.

    2- Having your Spanish romantic partner will mean more opportunity to practice speaking
    Nothing beats continuous practice when learning a new language. Your partner will probably be very willing to assist you in this, as your enhanced Spanish language skills will enhance the relationship. Communication is, after all, one of the most important pillars of a good partnership. Also, you will get to impress your lover with the knowledge gained through your studies - a win/win situation!

    3- A supportive Spanish lover is likely to make a gentle, patient teacher and study aid!
    With his/her heart filled with love and goodwill for you, your Spanish partner is likely to patiently and gently correct your mistakes when you speak. This goes not only for grammar, but also for accent and meaning. With his/her help, you could sound like a native in no time!

    Three Reasons Why SpanishPod101 helps you learn Spanish Even Faster when you’re In Love

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    1- All the Resources and Materials Will Help Both of You
    Falling in love with a man or woman speaking Spanish is an opportunity for both of you to learn a new language! For this reason, every lesson, transcript, vocabulary list, and resource at SpanishPod101 is translated into both English and Spanish. So, while your partner can help you learn Spanish faster, you can potentially also help him/her learn and master English!

    2- Lessons Are Designed to Help You Understand and Engage with Spanish Culture
    At SpanishPod101, our focus is to help our students learn practical vocabulary and phrases used by everyday people in Spain. This means that, from your very first lesson, you can apply what you learn immediately! So, when your Spanish partner wants to go out to a restaurant, play Pokemon Go, or attend just about any social function, you have the vocabulary and phrases necessary to have a great time!

    3- Access to Special Resources Dedicated to Romantic Spanish Phrases
    You now have access to SpanishPod101’s specially-developed sections and tools to teach you love words, phrases, and cultural insights to help you find and attract your Spanish soul mate. A personal tutor will assist you to master these brilliantly - remember to invite him/her to your wedding!

    How to Say “Hello” in Spanish

    How to Say Hello in Spanish

    Even if you don’t actually have the intention of learning a language, being able to say hello to someone when you’re traveling makes you look good. We all know this, don’t we? You just need to try not to pronounce it too well, so that they don’t mistake you for a native speaker—because we’re sure you’d rather not have to stand there awkwardly while they talk to you in a language you don’t know!

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    However, if you do want to learn a language, it’s extremely important that you know how to greet someone in different ways for various occasions. This is why today, at SpanishPod101.com, we’ll show you how to say “hello” or “good morning” in Spanish—as well as in the other languages that are spoken in Spain—for everyone who wishes to learn Spanish or perhaps just travel to Spain.

    So without further ado, here’s our guide on Spanish greetings and introductions!

    1. Five Different Ways of Saying “Hello” in Spanish (Spain)

    Just like in English, and probably most (if not all) languages, Spanish has more than one way of greeting someone. As you might already know, the most common word is Hola, which can be used at any time of the day, in any situation, either formally or informally, and all over Spain or any Spanish-speaking country. It’s short, simple, and all you need to remember is that in Spanish we don’t pronounce the letter h.

    Boy Saying Hello

    We’ve made a list of all the most common Spanish greetings you should know if you want to start learning European Spanish.

    1- Hola

    It means “hello” or “hi” in Spanish and, as we’ve already mentioned, this word is the most common Spanish greeting and can be used at all times.

    2- Buenos días

    It literally means “good days” and is generally used in the morning, so it’s the equivalent of “good morning,” in English. This expression is usually more formal than the simple hola, but it can also be used in informal contexts.

    Maybe you noticed that when we translated it literally, we wrote “good days,” in the plural. No, it wasn’t a mistake. In Spanish, for some reason, all these greetings are in the plural. Just so you know, we’ll just translate the two following phrases in the singular, as that’s the equivalent in English, even though they are also in the plural.

    3- Buenas tardes

    This phrase translates to “good afternoon,” and it’s commonly used between noon and sunset. Just like buenos días, this expression also tends to be more formal than simple hola.

    4- Buenas noches

    This one’s a little different than in English, because it translates to both “good evening” and “good night.” This is because in Spanish, there’s no word for “evening,” so we use the word “night” for both. Notice that in English, “good night” is generally used when someone is going to sleep, or when it’s nighttime and you don’t think you’re going to see this person again, so it’s more of a “goodbye” than a “hello.” In Spanish, however, it can be used as both. This means that, as soon as the sun sets, you can greet someone by saying “¡Buenas noches!” but you can also wish them a good night in the same way.

    5- Ey

    This greeting is also another word for “hello,” and as you might have guessed, it’s basically equivalent to “hi” or “hey” in Spanish. Just a short and easy word. Ey. But of course, the fact that it’s short and easy means it’s not appropriate for formal events, so you only use this word when greeting a friend.

    Spanish Greetings

    2. Four Different Ways of Saying “How are you?” in Spanish

    In English, you can also greet someone by asking “How are you?” or with similar expressions. This is also possible in Spanish, so now we’re going to see a few common ways to do it. This should answer your question of how to say “how are you?” in Spanish, so that you can greet with flying colors.

    Girl Saying Hello

    1- ¿Cómo estás?

    This translates to “How are you?” To be honest, there’s not much we can say about it. Basically, it can be used any time.

    2- ¿Qué tal?

    This is just another way of asking “How are you?” but in a slightly informal way. Or at least that’s what the theory says, because the truth is, you’ll hear this everywhere. You can also add the word todo (which means “all”) at the end, as in ¿Qué tal todo?, and this way, the person you asked won’t only tell you how they are, but also make a reference to how their job is going, or how their family is. This is because this question’s meaning is changed to “How is it all going?

    3- ¿Qué pasa?

    This expression literally means “What’s happening?” and is equivalent to the English “What’s up?” in Spanish, but it’s not as widely used as in English. However, just like in English, it’s an informal expression, unless you actually want to ask what has happened.

    4- ¿Cómo va?

    This is another commonly used Spanish expression that translates to “How is it going?” Just like in ¿Qué tal?, we can also add todo at the end of the question and say ¿Cómo va todo? so that it means “How is it all going?

    3. How to Greet in Spanish

    Just like in other languages and cultures, sometimes greeting isn’t all about the words you say. Spanish greeting body language is pretty important to consider before visiting the country. In Spain, there are some particular ways of greeting someone.

    If the greeting is between a woman and a man or a woman and another woman—or between kids—the most usual greeting is called dos besos and means to kiss them twice: once on each cheek, always starting by leaning to your left side, which is their right cheek. Notice that in other countries, such as France, they start on the other side.

    However, if you’re a man and you’re greeting another man, you should always go for a handshake. If you’re close friends, you can hug him or pat his back, and if he’s a member of your family, you can also give him dos besos or kiss him on the cheeks, like we explained just before.

    Kiss On The Cheek

    Going back to the words we use, it’s really helpful for you to know that you can combine some of these greetings with each other. For instance, you can put hola in front of anything; and there are still some others you can combine.

    But keep in mind that this doesn’t apply to all of them, which is just common sense: you wouldn’t say “Good morning, good night” to someone, unless you woke up after a big nap (or siesta) and got confused, or are talking to your friend on the other side of the world, who wakes up when you go to bed, or vice versa.

    But you can mix pretty much all the others. Just like in English, you wouldn’t say “How are you? Hello!”, but you would start by saying “Hello.” Here are some examples:

    • Hola, buenos días.
    • Hola, ¿qué tal?
    • Buenas noches, ¿cómo estás?
    • Ey, ¿cómo va?

    You could even say this and it wouldn’t sound weird:

    • ¿Qué tal, cómo estás?

    We bet you’re thinking: “But you just said ‘How are you?’ twice!” Well, yes, that’s exactly what it is. You would be surprised at how often we say this.

    As you can see, there are several ways of saying hello and greeting people in Spanish—so explore a little bit and see how colorful your Spanish greetings and introductions can become!

    4. How to Answer the Phone in Spain

    To complete the previous lists, we thought it would be useful to know how to answer the phone in Spanish. You never know if you’ll need it! Here are a few common ways of answering the phone in Spanish if you get a call when it’s needed.

    Answering A Phone Call

    1- ¿Hola?

    We’ve already learned that Hola means “Hello”. This greeting, when turned into a question, is also a very common way of answering the phone in Spanish. It’s not a formal way of doing it, but it can still be used most times.

    2- ¿Diga? or ¿Dígame?

    These two different ways of answering the phone are slightly more formal than answering with ¿Hola?, especially the second one, ¿Dígame?. They both mean “Tell me?” in Spanish.

    3- ¿Sí?

    This last expression on the list means “Yes” and is a really simple and informal way of answering the phone, though it’s still really common in some regions in Spain.

    5. Greetings in Other Languages Spoken in Spain

    Spain is a multilingual country, which means that, while Spanish is the only official language and it’s spoken everywhere you go in Spain, there are a few regions that have co-official languages. Even though everyone (or nearly everyone) speaks and understands Spanish, it might be helpful to know a few basic phrases in these regional languages, depending on what city you choose to visit. You may or may not have heard of these languages before, but they are actually pretty important.

    For example, if you visit Barcelona, you should know that Catalan is widely spoken there. Or if you visit Valencia, you’ll hear some people speaking Valencian, or read signs that aren’t in Spanish. We won’t get into details, but there is a debate on whether Valencian and Catalan are different languages or dialects of the same language. Either way, don’t worry about it, they’re pretty similar.

    Another language we have is Galician, which you might hear if you visit Santiago de Compostela. And last but not least, there is Basque, which is spoken in cities including Bilbao and San Sebastián, and is completely different than all these other languages spoken in Spain. But not just that: it’s also completely different than any other language in the world. WHAT!? That’s right. We have no idea how this happened, but it’s not related to any other known language.

    Map Of Europe

    Let’s take a quick look at some greetings in these other languages, along with their English translations:

    • Catalan/Valencian:
      • Hola = “Hello” (Lucky for you, Spanish, Catalan, and Valencian share this word, so that makes things easier)
      • Bon dia = “Good day”
      • Bona tarda = “Good afternoon”
      • Bona vesprada = “Good evening” – only in Valencian. (Note: Catalan also has a word for “evening,” which is vespre, but the expression bon vespre isn’t used anymore.)
      • Bona nit = “Good night”
    • Galician:
      • Ola = “Hello” (Galician has a slightly different spelling of the word Hola, but it has the same pronunciation)
      • Bos días = “Good day”
      • Boas tardes = “Good afternoon”
      • Boas noites = “Good night”
    • Basque (I told you this language was completely different than the others!):
      • Kaixo = “Hello”
      • Egun on = “Good morning”
      • Arratsalde on = “Good afternoon”
      • Gabon = “Good night”

    And hey, just to surprise you a little more, there are actually a few more regional languages: Aranese, Aragonese, Asturian, and Leonese. These languages aren’t official, except for Aranese, and they’re only spoken by minorities, so don’t worry about them.

    Hopefully this additional list has given you the ability and confidence to master not only Spanish greetings, but every other greeting you’ll need for your trip to Spain.

    6. How SpanishPod101 Can Help You Learn More Spanish

    So now you know how to say words like “hello” and “good afternoon” in Spanish. Was that too hard? We don’t think so. If you can’t remember what you should say throughout the day, just keep in mind that hola will work every single time!

    And now…what’s next?

    Maybe you could try learning a few more simple words and phrases, and very soon, start having basic conversations! Get started by checking out the Top 15 Spanish Questions You Should Know for Conversations! Or how about learning how to introduce yourself with 10 Spanish Lines You Need for Introducing Yourself?

    At SpanishPod101.com, you’ll learn other useful expressions like the ones you just learned, and so much more!

    So for now, take the knowledge you learned in this Spanish greetings guide and work your way up to the top of the language success ladder!

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    How to Celebrate April Fools’ Day in Spanish

    How to Celebrate April Fools' Day in Spanish!

    Most everyone is familiar with this day, as it is celebrated nearly everywhere the world. Yet, when exactly is April Fools’ Day? And where did April Fools come from? April Fools’ Day is observed on April 1st every year. This day of jokes and pranks is believed to have stemmed from the 16th-century calendar change in France, when New Year’s Day was moved from April 1 to January 1. This action was taken due to the adoption of the Gregorian calendar.

    However, a few people were resistant to the calendar change, so they continued to observe New Year’s Day on April 1st, rather than the new date. They were referred to as the “April Fools”, and others started playing mocking tricks on them. This custom endured, and is practiced to this day around the world!

    Table of Contents

    1. Top One Million Words You Need to Know for April Fools’ Day
    2. Spanish Phrases You Can Use on April Fools’ Day
    3. Some of the Coolest April Fools’ Pranks To Play on Anybody
    4. How Can SpanishPod101 Make Your April Fools’ Day Special?
    5. Top 1000 Most Useful Phrases in Spanish - Testing New Technology

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    1. Top One Million Words You Need to Know for April Fools’ Day

    Do you want to know how to say April Fools’ Day in Spanish? Well, there are millions of ways and words, but here are the top one million Spanish words you really need to know! Simply click this link. Here are some of them you will find useful:

    1. funny - gracioso
    2. joke - broma
    3. lie - mentir
    4. surprise - sorpresa
    5. prankster - bromista
    6. prank - broma
    7. humor - humor
    8. fool - tonto
    9. deceptive - engañosa
    10. April 1st - Primero de Abril
    11. play a joke - jugar una broma
    12. sneaky - a escondidas

    2. Spanish Phrases You Can Use on April Fools’ Day

    Spanish Phrases for April Fools' Day

    Don’t limit yourself to practical jokes - use these April Fools’ phrases in Spanish to prank your favorite Spanish speaking friend or colleague!

    1. All classes for today got canceled.
      • Todas las clases de hoy fueron canceladas.
    2. I’m sorry, but I’ve just broken your favorite pair of glasses.
      • Lo siento, pero acabo de romper tus lentes favoritos.
    3. Someone has just hit your car.
      • Alguien acaba de pegarle a tu carro.
    4. I’m getting married.
      • Me voy a casar.
    5. You won a free ticket.
      • Te ganaste un boleto gratis.
    6. I saw your car being towed.
      • Vi que remolcaron tu carro.
    7. They’re giving away free gift cards in front of the building.
      • Están dando tarjetas de regalo gratis en frente del edificio.
    8. A handsome guy is waiting for you outside.
      • Un chico guapo está esperandote afuera.
    9. A beautiful lady asked me to give this phone number to you.
      • Una hermosa dama me pidió que te diera este número de teléfono.
    10. Can you come downstairs? I have something special for you.
      • ¿Puedes venir abajo? Tengo algo especial para ti.
    11. Thank you for your love letter this morning. I never could have guessed your feelings.
      • Gracias por tu carta de amor de esta mañana. Nunca podría haber adivinado tus sentimientos.

    Choose your victims carefully, though; the idea is to get them to laugh with you, not to hurt their feelings or humiliate them in front of others. Be extra careful if you choose to play a prank on your boss - you don’t want to antagonize them with an inappropriate joke.

    3. Some of the Coolest April Fools’ Pranks To Play on Anybody

    Choose Bad or Good

    Right, now that you know the top million April Fools’ words in Spanish, let’s look at some super pranks and tricks to play on friends, colleagues and family. Some April Fools ideas never grow old, while new ones are born every year.

    Never joke in such a way that it hurts anyone, or humiliates them badly in front of others - the idea is for everybody to laugh and enjoy the fun! Respect is still key, no matter what day of the year it is.

    Cockroach prank

    1- Infestation

    This trick is so simple, yet so creepy, it’s almost unbelievable. Take black paper, cut out the silhouette of a giant cockroach, a spider or another insect, and stick it inside the lampshade of a table lamp. When the lamp is switched on, it will look like a monstrous insect is sitting inside the lampshade. Or, get a whole lot of realistic-looking plastic insects, and spread them over a colleague’s desk and chair, or, at home, over the kids’ beds etc. Creep-factor: stellar.

    2- Which One Doesn’t Fit?

    Put the photo of a celebrity or a notorious politician in a frame, and take it to work on April Fools’ Day. Hang the photo on the staff picture wall, and wait. You’ll be surprised how long it can take for people to notice that one picture doesn’t fit.

    3- Something Weird in the Restroom

    At work, replace the air freshener in the restroom with something noxious like insect killer, oven cleaner or your own odious mixture in a spray bottle. Be sure to cover the bottle’s body so no one suspects a swap.

    Or paint a bar of soap with clear nail polish, and leave it at the hand wash basin. It will not lather.

    Or, if your workplace’s restroom has partitioned toilets with short doors, arrange jeans or trousers and shoes on all but one of the toilet covers, so it looks like every stall is occupied. Now wait for complaints, and see how long it takes for someone to figure out the April Fools’ Day prank. You’ll probably wish you had a camera inside the restroom. But, unless you don’t mind getting fired, don’t put your own recording device in there!

    Funny Face

    4- Call Me Funny

    Prepare and print out a few posters with the following instructions: Lion Roar Challenge! Call this number - 123-456-7890 - and leave your best lion’s roar as voicemail! Best roarer will be announced April 10 in the cafeteria. Prize: $100. (Lion’s roar is just an example; you can use any animal call, or even a movie character’s unique sound, such as Chewbacca from Star Wars. The weirder, the funnier. Obviously!) Put the posters up in the office where most of the staff is likely to see them. Now wait for the owner of the number to visit you with murderous intent. Have a conciliatory gift ready that’s not a prank.

    5- Minty Cookies

    This is another simple but hugely effective prank - simply separate iced cookies, scrape off the icing, and replace it with toothpaste. Serve during lunch or tea break at work, or put in your family’s lunch boxes. Be sure to take photos of your victim’s faces when they first bite into your April Fools’ cookies.

    6- Wild Shopping

    At your local grocer, place a realistic-looking plastic snake or spider among the fresh vegetables. Now wait around the corner for the first yell.

    7- The Oldest Trick in the Book

    Don’t forget probably the oldest, yet very effective April Fools’ joke in the book - smearing hand cream or Vaseline on a door handle that most staff, family or friends are likely to use. Yuck to the max!

    8- Sneeze On Me

    Another golden oldie is also gross, yet harmless and utterly satisfying as a prank. Fill a small spray bottle that you can easily conceal with water. Walk past a friend, colleague or one of your kids, and fake a sneeze while simultaneously spraying them with a bit of water. Expect to be called a totally disgusting person. Add a drop of lovely smelling essential oil to the water for extra confusion.

    9- Word Play Repairs

    Put a fresh leek in the hand wash basin at home or work, and then tell your housemates or colleagues this: “There’s a huge leak in the restroom/bathroom basin, it’s really serious. Please can someone go have a look?!” Expect exasperation and smiles all around. Note that this prank is only likely to work where people understand English well.

    10- Scary Face

    Print out a very scary face on an A4 sheet of paper, and place it in a colleague’s, or one of your kid’s drawers, so it’s the first thing they see when they open the drawer. You may not be very popular for a while.

    11- Wake Up To Madness

    Put foamy shaving cream, or real whipped cream on your hand, and wake your kid up by tickling their nose with it. As long as they get the joke, this could be a wonderful and fun way to start April Fools’ Day.

    Computer Prank

    12- Computer Prank

    This one’s fabulous, if you have a bit of time to fiddle with a colleague, friend or your kid’s computer. It is most effective on a computer where most of the icons they use are on the desktop background itself (as opposed to on the bottom task bar).

    Take and save a screenshot of their desktop with the icons. Set this screenshot as their background image. Now delete all the working icons. When they return to their computer, wait for the curses when no amount of clicking on the icons works.

    13- Monster Under the Cup

    This one will also work well anywhere people meet. Take a paper cup, and write the following on it in black pen: “Danger! Don’t lift, big spider underneath.” Place it upside-down on prominent flat surface, such as a kitchen counter, a colleague’s desk or a restaurant table. Expect some truly interesting responses.

    Door Prank

    14- Prank Door

    Write in large letters on a large and noticeable piece of paper: PUSH. Tape this notice on a door that should be pulled to open, and watch the hilarious struggle of those clever souls who actually read signs.

    4. How Can SpanishPod101 Make Your April Fools’ Day Special?

    If you happen to visit Spanish speaking countries like Spain and Mexico, or if you work for any Spanish speaking company, knowing the above Spanish prankster phrases can really lighten up your day. Showing you have a sense of humor can go a long way to cement good relationships in any situation. These phrases are at your disposal for free, as well as are these 100 core Spanish words, which you will learn how to pronounce perfectly.

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    Also, don’t stop at learning April Fools’ phrases in Spanish - bone up your Spanish language skills with these FREE key phrases. Yes, SpanishPod101 doesn’t joke when it comes to effective, fun and easy learning.

    Now, as a bonus, test our super-learning technology, and learn the Top 1000 most useful phrases in Spanish below! But that’s not all. Read on to learn how you can be eligible for large enrollment discounts at SpanishPod101.

    5. Top 1000 Most Useful Phrases in Spanish - testing new technology

    Help us by being a language guinea pig! Listen to this video above with embedded cutting-edge, frequency-based learning technology that enables you to learn large amounts of data in record time.

    • Note: This technology is in beta-phase of development, and we invite your input for fine-tuning.
    • To participate: Watch the video for instructions, and leave a comment to rate it. Your comment will make you eligible for large enrollment-fee discounts. To watch the video, please click the play button.

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    How to Say Happy New Year in Spanish & New Year Wishes

    Learn all the Spanish New Year wishes online, in your own time, on any device! Join SpanishPod101 for a special Spanish New Year celebration!

    How to Say Happy New Year in Spanish

    Can you relate to the year passing something like this: “January, February, March - December!”? Many people do! Quantum physics teaches us that time is relative, and few experiences illustrate this principle as perfectly as when we reach the end of a year. To most of us, it feels like the old one has passed in the blink of an eye, while the new year lies ahead like a very long journey! However, New Year is also a time to celebrate beginnings, and to say goodbye to what has passed. This is true in every culture, no matter when New Year is celebrated.

    So, how do you say Happy New Year in Spanish? Let a native teach you! At SpanishPod101, you will learn how to correctly greet your friends over New Year, and wish them well with these Spanish New Year wishes!

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    Table of Contents

    1. How to Celebrate New Year in Spain
    2. Must-Know Spanish Words & Phrases for the New Year!
    3. Top 10 New Year’s Resolutions in Spanish
    4. Inspirational New Year Quotes
    5. Inspirational Language Learning Quotes
    6. How To Say Happy New Year in 31 Languages
    7. How SpanishPod101 Can Help You Learn Spanish

    But let’s start with some vocabulary for Spanish New Year celebrations, very handy for conversations.

    1. How to Celebrate New Year in Spain

    Let’s talk about a day full of excitement, wishes, and resolutions for the Spanish people. It is called “Noche Vieja” (”New Year’s Eve“), and it is the last night of the year, the one that marks the beginning of a new year. This holiday does not stop until the next day, January 1.

    Do you know why there is a tradition of eating grapes on New Year’s Eve? Keep reading and you will find out at the end!

    Before midnight, it is common to have a big dinner, similar to Christmas, with all the family. On the television, all programs show New Year’s specials. The best comedians and most famous celebrities participate in these specials. Musical concerts are also common, from current and in-vogue singers, to those known by grandparents, parents and children.

    As 12 o’clock approaches, you can feel the excitement. The bowls are prepared, and it’s confirmed that each contains twelve grapes. The most traditional place to eat grapes is La Puerta del Sol in Madrid. But nowadays, it is done in all cities, and it’s also common to eat them at home, in front of the television. You hear the bells chime every year. And…ton, ton! It’s finally time to eat the first grape, the second…but be careful! Every year, there are cases of choking.

    Once the New Year starts, it’s normal to congratulate, hug and toast with all the family. In those toasts, it is normal to put a gold ring into a glass to attract money. From this moment on, the phone lines will be overloaded and everybody will send and receive congratulatory messages and phone calls from friends and family members. After that, it is common to go out into the street, or to a pub or nightclub. And then it’s time to celebrate until you can no longer stand!

    It is normal on this day to wear new clothes for the first time, but not only that! It is also tradition to wear a new set of underwear for New Year’s Eve. Normally, it will be yellow in color if you want to attract money, or, more often, red, if you want to attract love.

    And now, the answer to the earlier quiz.

    Do you know why there is a tradition of eating grapes on New Year’s Eve?

    It seems this tradition doesn’t have any religious or cultural motivations; it is actually economical. On New Year’s Eve of 1909, the grape harvesters had had a big harvest of grapes, and because of this, they invented the tradition of eating the lucky grapes on the last night of the year.

    Happy New Year!
    ¡Feliz Año Nuevo!

    2. Must-Know Spanish Words & Phrases for the New Year!

    Spanish Words & Phrases for the New Year

    1- Year

    Año

    This is pretty self-explanatory. Most countries follow a Gregorian calendar, which has approximately 365 days in a year, while in some cultures, other year designations are also honored. Therefore, New Year’s day in Spain could fall on a different day than in your country. When do you celebrate New Year?

    2- Midnight

    Medianoche

    The point in time when a day ends and a new one starts. Many New Year celebrants prefer to stay awake till midnight, and greet the new annum as it breaks with fanfare and fireworks!

    3- New Year’s Day

    Día de Año Nuevo

    In most countries, the new year is celebrated for one whole day. On the Gregorian calendar, this falls on January 1st. On this day, different cultures engage in festive activities, like parties, parades, big meals with families and many more.

    You can do it!

    4- Party

    Fiesta

    A party is most people’s favorite way to end the old year, and charge festively into the new one! We celebrate all we accomplished in the old year, and joyfully anticipate what lies ahead.

    5- Dancing

    Baile

    Usually, when the clock strikes midnight and the New Year officially begins, people break out in dance! It is a jolly way to express a celebratory mood with good expectations for the year ahead. Also, perhaps, that the old year with its problems has finally passed! Dance parties are also a popular way to spend New Year’s Eve in many places.

    6- Champagne

    Champán

    Originating in France, champagne is a bubbly, alcoholic drink that is often used to toast something or someone during celebrations.

    7- Fireworks

    Fuegos Artificiales

    These are explosives that cause spectacular effects when ignited. They are popular for announcing the start of the new year with loud noises and colorful displays! In some countries, fireworks are set off to scare away evil spirits. In others, the use of fireworks is forbidden in urban areas due to their harmful effect on pets. Most animals’ hearing is much more sensitive than humans’, so this noisy display can be very frightful and traumatising to them.

    8- Countdown

    Cuenta Regresiva

    This countdown refers to New Year celebrants counting the seconds, usually backward, till midnight, when New Year starts - a great group activity that doesn’t scare animals, and involves a lot of joyful shouting when the clock strikes midnight!

    9- New Year’s Holiday

    Vacaciones de Año Nuevo

    In many countries, New Year’s Day is a public holiday - to recuperate from the party the previous night, perhaps! Families also like to meet on this day to enjoy a meal and spend time together.

    10- Confetti

    Confeti

    In most Western countries, confetti is traditionally associated with weddings, but often it is used as a party decoration. Some prefer to throw it in the air at the strike of midnight on New Year’s Eve.

    11- New Year’s Eve

    Noche Vieja

    This is the evening before New Year breaks at midnight! Often, friends and family meet for a party or meal the evening before, sometimes engaging in year-end rituals. How are you planning to give your New Year greetings in 2018?

    12- Toast

    Brindis

    A toast is a type of group-salutation that involves raising your glass to drink with others in honor of something or someone. A toast to the new year is definitely in order!

    13- Resolution

    Propósitos de Año Nuevo

    Those goals or intentions you hope to, but seldom keep in the new year! Many people consider the start of a new year to be the opportune time for making changes or plans. Resolutions are those intentions to change, or the plans. It’s best to keep your resolutions realistic so as not to disappoint yourself!

    14- Parade

    Desfile

    New Year celebrations are a huge deal in some countries! Parades are held in the streets, often to celebratory music, with colorful costumes and lots of dancing. Parades are like marches, only less formal and way more fun. At SpanishPod101, you can engage in forums with natives who can tell you what Spanish New Year celebrations are like!

    3. Top 10 New Year’s Resolutions

    So, you learned the Spanish word for ‘resolution’. Fabulous! Resolutions are those goals and intentions that we hope to manifest in the year that lies ahead. The beginning of a new year serves as a good marker in time to formalise these. Some like to do it in writing, others only hold these resolutions in their hearts. Here are our Top 10 New Year’s resolutions at SpanishPod101 - what are yours?

    Learn these phrases and impress your Spanish friends with your vocabulary.

    New Year's Resolutions

    1- Read more

    Leer más.

    Reading is a fantastic skill that everyone can benefit from. You’re a business person? Apparently, successful business men and women read up to 60 books a year. This probably excludes fiction, so better scan your library or Amazon for the top business reads if you plan to follow in the footsteps of the successful! Otherwise, why not make it your resolution to read more Spanish in the new year? You will be surprised by how much this will improve your Spanish language skills!

    2- Spend more time with family

    Pasar más tiempo en familia.

    Former US President George Bush’s wife, Barbara Bush, was quoted as having said this: “At the end of your life, you will never regret not having passed one more test, not winning one more verdict, or not closing one more deal. You will regret time not spent with a husband, a friend, a child, a parent.” This is very true! Relationships are often what gives life meaning, so this is a worthy resolution for any year.

    3- Lose weight

    Bajar de peso.

    Hands up, how many of you made this new year’s resolution last year too…?! This is a notoriously difficult goal to keep, as it takes a lot of self discipline not to eat unhealthily. Good luck with this one, and avoid unhealthy fad diets!

    4- Save money

    Ahorrar dinero.

    Another common and difficult resolution! However, no one has ever been sorry when they saved towards reaching a goal. Make it your resolution to save money to upgrade your subscription to SpanishPod101’s Premium PLUS option in the new year - it will be money well spent!

    5- Quit smoking

    Dejar de fumar.

    This is a resolution that you should definitely keep, or your body could punish you severely later! Smoking is a harmful habit with many hazardous effects on your health. Do everything in your power to make this resolution come true in the new year, as your health is your most precious asset.

    6- Learn something new

    Aprender algo nuevo.

    Science has proven that learning new skills can help keep brain diseases such as dementia and Alzheimer’s at bay! It can even slow down the progression of the disease. So, keep your brain healthy by learning to speak a new language, studying towards a qualification, learning how to sew, or how to play chess - no matter how old you are, the possibilities are infinite!

    7- Drink less

    Beber menos.

    This is another health resolution that is good to heed any time of the year. Excessive drinking is associated with many diseases, and its effect can be very detrimental to good relationships too. Alcohol is a poison and harmful for the body in large quantities!

    8- Exercise regularly

    Ejercitarse regularmente.

    This resolution goes hand-in-hand with ‘Lose weight’! An inactive body is an unhealthy and often overweight one, so give this resolution priority in the new year.

    9- Eat healthy

    Comer saludable.

    If you stick with this resolution, you will lose weight and feel better in general. It is a very worthy goal to have!

    10- Study Spanish with SpanishPod101

    Estudiar Español con SpanishPod101.com

    Of course! You can only benefit from learning Spanish, especially with us! Learning how to speak Spanish can keep your brain healthy, it can widen your circle of friends, and improve your chances to land a dream job anywhere in the world. SpanishPod101 makes it easy and enjoyable for you to stick to this resolution.

    4. Inspirational New Year Quotes

    Inspirational Quotes

    Everyone knows that it is sometimes very hard to stick to resolutions, and not only over New Year. The reasons for this vary from person to person, but all of us need inspiration every now and then! A good way to remain motivated is to keep inspirational quotes near as reminders that it’s up to us to reach our goals.

    Click here for quotes that will also work well in a card for a special Spanish new year greeting!

    Make decorative notes of these in Spanish, and keep them close! Perhaps you could stick them above your bathroom mirror, or on your study’s wall. This way you not only get to read Spanish incidentally, but also remain inspired to reach your goals! Imagine feeling like giving up on a goal, but reading this quote when you go to the bathroom: “It does not matter how slowly you go, as long as you do not stop.” What a positive affirmation!

    5. Inspirational Language Learning Quotes

    Language Learning Quotes

    Still undecided whether you should enroll with SpanishPod101 to learn a new language? There’s no time like the present to decide! Let the following Language Learning Quotes inspire you with their wisdom.

    Click here to read the most inspirational Language Learning Quotes!

    As legendary President Nelson Mandela once said: “If you talk to a man in a language he understands, that goes to his head. If you talk to him in his own language, that goes to his heart.” So, learning how to say Happy New Year in Spanish could well be a way into someone special’s heart for you! Let this year be the one where you to learn how to say Happy New Year, and much more, in Spanish - it could open many and unexpected doors for you.

    6. How To Say Happy New Year in 31 Languages

    Here’s a lovely bonus for you! Why stop with Spanish - learn how to say Happy New Year in 31 other languages too! Watch this video and learn how to pronounce these New Year’s wishes like a native in under two minutes.

    7. Why Enrolling with SpanishPod101 Would Be the Perfect New Year’s Gift to Yourself!

    If you are unsure how to celebrate the New Year, why not give yourself a huge gift, and enroll to learn Spanish! With more than 12 years of experience behind us, we know that SpanishPod101 would be the perfect fit for you. There are so many reasons for this!

    Learning Paths

    • Custom-tailored Learning Paths: Start learning Spanish at the level that you are. We have numerous Learning Pathways, and we tailor them just for you based on your goals and interests! What a boon!
    • Marked Progress and Fresh Learning Material Every Week: We make new lessons available every week, with an option to track your progress. Topics are culturally appropriate and useful, such as “Learning how to deliver negative answers politely to a business partner.” Our aim is to equip you with Spanish that makes sense!
    • Multiple Learning Tools: Learn in fun, easy ways with resources such 1,000+ video and audio lessons, flashcards, detailed PDF downloads, and mobile apps suitable for multiple devices!
    • Fast Track Learning Option: If you’re serious about fast-tracking your learning, Premium Plus would be the perfect way to go! Enjoy perks such as personalised lessons with ongoing guidance from your own, native-speaking teacher, and one-on-one learning on your mobile app! You will not be alone in your learning. Weekly assignments with non-stop feedback, answers and corrections will ensure speedy progress.
    • Fun and Easy: Keeping the lessons fun and easy-to-learn is our aim, so you will stay motivated by your progress!

    Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - How to Master A Language!

    There’s no reason not to go big in 2018 by learning Spanish with SpanishPod101. Just imagine how the world can open up for you!

    3 Reasons Why Playing Games Helps You Learn Spanish Faster

    Discover 3 ways that Spanish learning games and video games can help you learn and master Spanish faster, retain more, and enhance your language skills.

    reasons why playing games helps you learn faster

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    Can You Learn Spanish Using Games?

    Yes, Spanish learning games and even video games can help you learn and master Spanish faster and improve overall comprehension. Research studies have concluded that video games enhance traditional learning methods and make mastering a new language like Spanish fun and exciting. Without the firm foundation in grammar and vocabulary provided by conventional learning programs, however, you will not be able to learn Spanish with games alone. But when you combine the solid educational foundation like you’ll get at SpanishPod101 with the benefits of Spanish learning games, you learn faster and retain more than with traditional learning alone.

    Let’s now take a look at three of the biggest benefits of using video games to learn Spanish:

    Video Games Help Improve Linguistic Skills and Cognitive Development

    When combined with a solid foundation in vocabulary and grammar, video games help students improve reading, comprehension, and even speaking skills. The results are even more pronounced in struggling students. According to a recent national survey, more than 78% of teachers noted that learning games, even video games, were effective in helping struggling students compensate for learning gaps in their traditional studies.

    So how do Spanish learning games, or even video games, help students improve their linguistic skills and cognitive development? The key is practice, practice, and more practice!
    Learning games and video games naturally require the integration of several linguistic skills including reading, listening, speaking, and even writing in some games. And by removing the fear of making mistakes so common in students in traditional classroom settings, students are free to practice the language and further develop their linguistic and cognitive abilities in the process.

    Do a compliment in Spanish? Break-Up Lines? Our Vocabulary Lists are Made for You!

    Learning Games/Video Games Provide In-Context Learning

    Students naturally learn faster and comprehend more when they are forced to use the information often and in real-world situations, even the fake ones created by Spanish learning games and video games. Essentially, this is immersion-based learning or contextual learning very similar to what one experiences when living abroad and being forced to interact with people in another language. So by providing both context and constant feedback, video games allow students to actually use the knowledge they gain in classrooms or conventional study to learn and master Spanish or any new language faster.

    Spanish Learning Games Make Studying Fun and Alleviate Stress

    Homework, quizzes, tests, and even in-class assignments can cause a great deal of stress and anxiety in students, particularly those who may be struggling to keep up. This stress and anxiety can actually derail a student’s progress and cause them to feel isolated from their more successful peers. But video games and even most learning games are the great equalizer because they help alleviate stress, increase social engagement, and yes, even help students have fun while learning Spanish or any new language.
    In fact, research recently published in The Washington Post shows a wide range of health benefits from video games and learning games including the fact that they:

  • Help Reduce or Alleviate Symptoms of Depression
  • Help Reduce or Alleviate Symptoms of Insomnia
  • Help Alleviate Transitory Stress Symptoms
  • Scientists have indeed discovered that not only can you learn Spanish or any new language faster thanks to video games, they can also provide a wide range of potential health benefits as well. However, learning languages through video games alone is not really a feasible alternative to progressive, structured learning like you find in classrooms or programs like SpanishPod101.

    Get Your FREE PDF eBook to Start Learning One of our 34 Languages!

    The Limitations of Learning Languages Through Video Games

    While great supplemental learning tools, video games and even more formal learning games are simply no substitute for structured learning programs for two reasons:

  • Learning Games Not Designed to Provide a Foundation in Grammar or Vocabulary: Without the foundation provided by structured Spanish learning (classroom or online), video games or even language learning games only teach specific phrases and concepts. Now within the context of the video game, these phrases and concepts make sense but most would have little practical value in the real world.
  • Lessons Are Not Structured or Progressive in Nature: Structured learning requires students to be provided with basic building blocks of knowledge (like grammar or vocab lessons) that are then expanded upon in a progressive fashion until mastery. Video games and even many language learning games really only quiz and reinforce what students already know instead of providing structured lessons that can be built upon for future learning.
  • Spanish learning games and even video games are great supplemental tools to help students learn and master a language faster. Scientific studies and recent research reveal that video games can help contextualize formal lessons from structured learning, enhance linguistic skills, alleviate stress, and even provide a wide range of potential health benefits. However, learning languages through video games (even learning games) has limitations and is no substitute for structured lessons that provide a firm foundation in vocabulary and grammar.

    SpanishPod101 is the world’s most advanced online learning system with tons of HD video lessons created by real Spanish instructors. With more than 500 million lesson downloads and 10,000’s of success stories, SpanishPod101 can provide you with a world-class foundation in vocabulary and grammar.

    Combined with Spanish learning games, our cutting edge online language system can propel you to mastering the language faster, more easily, and at far less expense than traditional classroom instruction.

    3 Reasons Why Successful Students Learn Spanish In the Car

    Not only is it possible to learn Spanish in your car, there are 3 great benefits that will help you master the language faster and with less effort.

    With everyone so pressed for time these days, it might seem like a daydream to believe that you could learn Spanish in your car—but it’s not! Thanks to a wide range of new technologies and resources, learning a language in your car is easier than ever. Not only is it easy to learn a language while driving, there are actually a number of benefits, especially if the lessons are part of a structured learning program like SpanishPod101. Here are three specific benefits to learning Spanish or any other new language in your car.

    3 reasons why successful students learn spanish in the car

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    1. Transform Downtime into Progress

    How much time do you spend commuting to and from work? Learning a language in your car transforms your commute time into tangible progress towards your dream. So instead of being stressed over how much time you are “wasting” on errands and daily commutes, you can decompress and have some fun while you learn Spanish in your car!

    2. Daily Exposure Leads to Passive Learning

    Practice makes perfect and learning a new language is no different. The daily exposure you get when you learn Spanish while driving helps improve listening comprehension, pronunciation, and of course helps build vocabulary and improve grammar. Don’t worry: You don’t need to memorize everything as you listen in Spanish while driving. Just having continuous exposure to a foreign language helps you improve your vocabulary, learn faster, and ultimately retain more through passive learning.


    3. Learning While Driving is Fun

    Learning a new language does require a serious commitment, but that doesn’t mean it can’t be fun! When you learn Spanish in your car, you get to take some time away from the PC or smartphone and immerse yourself in the language instead of just “studying” it.

    Plus, there are a number of “fun” activities that you can do and still learn in your car, such as:
    - Singing Along with Spanish Songs
    - Playing Word Games or Trivia
    - Just Listening Along and Seeing How Much You Can Pick Up and Understand

    Want to Learn How to Get Angry in Spanish? Pick-Up Lines? Our Vocabulary Lists are Made for You!

    Yes, you can learn a language while driving and have loads of fun doing it. Now let’s take a look at some specific things you can listen to while driving to help you learn a new language.

    BONUS: 3 Ways to Learn Spanish in Your Car

    -Listen to Podcasts: Typically designed to focus on one topic or lesson, podcasts are a great way to learn a language while driving. Unfortunately, podcasts are rarely at the same listening/comprehension level as the language learner so listeners may not get their full value. But at SpanishPod101, our podcasts are created for every skill level so you don’t waste any time on material that isn’t relevant or suited to your exact needs.

    -Sing Along to Spanish Songs: Remember, just immersing yourself in a language can create passive learning and improve your pronunciation. Plus, with SpanishPod101, you can sing along and memorize the lyrics, and then look the words up and add them to your personal dictionary.

    -Playing Word Games or Trivia: There are audio games available online that you can download to any media device and listen to on your commute. Although we recommend this option for more advanced users, games are a fun and productive way to learn Spanish in your car because they require listening and comprehension skills.

    Get the Free eBook of Your Choice to Start Learning One of our 34 Languages

    You won’t recognize or understand every word you hear in a Spanish song, podcast, or game—but that’s ok. The daily repetition and immersion in the language leads to passive learning that gradually increases your knowledge of vocabulary, grammar, and pronunciation. And the greater your foundation in grammar and vocabulary, the more you’ll understand and learn from the audio lessons, podcasts, or whatever you listen to while learning Spanish in your car.

    Yes, you can learn Spanish while driving because it leads to passive learning via daily immersion in the language. Although you may not understand all or even most of what you hear at first, the exposure helps improve pronunciation, vocabulary, and even grammar over time. Learning a language while driving also helps transform your commute into exciting “exotic adventures” that secretly teach you Spanish in the process. Podcasts, songs, and even games can all help you learn Spanish in your car while eliminating the “boring commute” in the process!

    At SpanishPod101, we have more than 2500+ HD audio lessons and podcasts for every skill level that you can download and use to learn Spanish while driving!
    So don’t forget to sign up for a Free Lifetime Account on SpanishPod101.com to access tons of FREE lessons and features to become fluent in Spanish!