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Lesson Transcript

Hi everyone.
Welcome to The Ultimate Spanish Pronunciation Guide.
In this lesson, you'll learn about metaplasms.
In Spanish, words are connected together when the final syllable of a word is identical or very similar to the beginning syllable of a following word.
You can kind of think of it as making two or more words into one big word.
This linking of words is what gives Spanish it's alluring fluidity.
There are two types of connections you can make in Spanish.
Between vowels.
And between identical consonants.
First, let's deal with connecting words that end and begin with vowel sounds.
"quiere (want)
entrar (to enter / to come in)"
Ella quiere entrar. (She wants to come in.)
"decía (tell/say)
a (to)
ambos (both)"
Martín se lo decía~a~ambos empleados. (Martin was saying it to both employees.)
As you can see, identical vowels will connect with each other.
When they connect, they combine to become one syllable and the vowel sound is prolonged accordingly.
Martín se lo decía~a~ambos empleados. (Martin was saying it to both employees.)
How about this one?
"va
a
hacer"
va a hacer (will do / going to do)
All three words are linked in this phrase, because remember, the H is silent in Spanish.
Let's look at a few other examples showing UNidentical vowels connecting with each other.
"me (I)
inclino (bend)"
me inclino "I bend (down)."
"como (tp eat)
una (one)"
como una "(I) eat one."
As you can see, the nature of linking words together between vowels is both rhythmic and fluid.
"volvió (to return)
a (to)
Europa (Europe)"
Silvana volvió~a~Europa. (Silvana returned to Europe.)
Now that we've looked at connecting words together between vowels, let's take a look at connecting consonants together.
"dicen (say)
nada (nothing)"
dicen nada "(They) don't say anything."
Carmen no suele hablar rápido. (Carmen doesn't tend to speak fast.)
Los socios suelen negociar repentinamente. (The partners tend to negotiate suddenly.)
As you can clearly see, consonants can also be combined in Spanish.
How about this one?
Es fácil leer revistas simplonas. (It is easy to read simple magazines.)
Unlike vowels however, consonants can only link if the sound is completely identical.
That's why the S and F are not connected in this example.
Listen to the native speaker again.
Es fácil leer revistas simplonas.
That's all for linking words together in Spanish.
In this lesson, you learnt how to speak fluidly by connecting words together in Spanish.
In the next lesson, you'll learn about accent reduction.
Can you think of another metaplasm example? Share it with us in the comments.
See you in the next Ultimate Spanish Pronunciation Guide lesson!
The Fusion of Words in Spoken Spanish
This lesson can be simplified to the following point:
In Spanish, words are blended together when an ending and a beginning have similar sounds.
Why do sounds sound blended together in spoken Spanish?
Because they are phonetically fused.
This pheonomena is called "metaplasm": Changes in spelling or pronunciation of words
sinalepha
Where a single syllable is formed out of the final syllable of one word and the first syllable of the next when the first word ends in a vowel and the second word begins in a vowel
Ella quiere~entrar.
Él tiene~hambre.
The sinalepha is really common in traditional poetry
Common Mistakes
Students learn about the proper prounciation of words and forget that it's not a language of words, but of phrases and sentences.
Students tend to separate the words out without any flow
Martín se lo decía~a~ambos empleados.
The pronunciation is actually more difficult without using the sinalepha
This is one of the main reasons spoken spanish has an attractive rhythm
Allows you to speak with greater fluidity
Examples
Ella quiere~entrar.
"Notice here the fusion of the vowel ""E"", such that the combination of the words sounds like
""quierentrar"""
Él tiene~hambre.
"Here, the fusion of the vowel ""E"" is with the vowel ""A"", passing over the ""H"", because it is
silent, resulting the the sound combination ""tieneambre"""
Jorge va~a~entrar a la casa.
"Here, the fusion takes place with the vowels ""A"", ""A"" and ""E"", making it sound like
""vaaentrar""."
Martín se lo decía~a~ambos empleados.
"In this case, the fusion takes place with the vowels ""I"", ""A"", ""A"", and ""A"", such that the sound
combination sounds like ""decíaaambos""."
Silvana volvió~a~Europa.
"In this example, all five vowels are fused. Notice the unique sound combination:
""volvióaeuropa""."
ecthlispsis
Similar pheonomenon that happens to consonants
The fusion of the final and initial consonant of two words when these consonants are identical or very similar
Carlos~sabe llegar.
"Here, the fusion occurs with the ""s"" of ""Carlos"" and the ""s"" of ""sabe"", allowing us to pronounce
""Carlosabe"", without a pause."
It's a common error to put a pause between the ecthlispsis, but natural Spanish will make it flow
No dicen~nada.
"In this case, the fusion occurs with the ""n"" of ""dicen"" and the ""n"" of ""nada, allowing us to
pronounce ""dicenada"", without a pause."
No habrá otra oportunidad~de viajar
"Here, the fusion occurs with the final ""d"" of ""oportunidad"" and the ""d"" of ""de"", allowing us to
pronounce ""oportunidade"", with a pause."
Carmen~no suele hablar~rápido.
"In this case, there are two instances of ecthlipsis. The first fusion takes place with the ""n"" of
""Carmen"" and the ""n"" of ""no"", allowing us to pronounce ""Carmeno"" without a pause. The
second fusion takes place with the ""r"" of ""hablar"" and the ""r"" of ""rápido"", allowing us to
pronounce ""hablarápido""."
Es fácil~leer~revistas~simplonas.
"Here, there are three instances of ecthlipsis. The first fusion occurs with the ""l"" of ""fácil"" and
the ""l"" of ""leer"". The second instance takes place with the ""r"" of ""leer"" and the ""r"" of ""revistas"".
And finally, the third case occurs with the ""s"" of ""revistas"" and the ""s"" of ""simplonas"". And this
allows us to pronounce ""fácileerevistasimplonas""."
Los~socios~suelen~negociar~repentinamente.
"In this case, there are four instances of ecthlipsis. This first occurs with the ""s"" of ""los"" and the
first ""s"" of ""socios"". The second occurs with the last ""s"" of ""socios"" and the ""s"" of ""suelen"". The
third takes place with the ""n"" of ""suelen"" and the ""n"" of ""negociar"". And the fourth case occurs
with the ""r"" of ""negociar"" and the ""r"" of ""repentinamente"". This allows us to pronounce
""Losociosuelenegociarepentinamente""."

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SpanishPod101.com
Friday at 6:30 pm
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Hi Listeners! Let us know if you have questions, here in the comment section. 

SpanishPod101.comVerified
Saturday at 2:24 am
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Hola Steve,


Thank you for your comment!

Please keep enjoying the lesson, and let us know if you have any question.


Saludos,

Carla

Team SpanishPod101.com

Steve
Monday at 10:45 pm
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This is very helpful and helps explain how I can sometimes have difficulty parsing out the words when I hear Spanish speakers (on radio or in person) and I was not aware of this rule prior to this. Thanks

SpanishPod101.comVerified
Friday at 4:23 pm
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Hi Carrie,


It will take time to get used to Spanish pronuncations as you study more. So please don't worry if that happens to you often and you are not able to distinguish some of the words well yet.


All the vocab we intorduce in each lesson have slow version of the vocab audio, and I hope these will help you to get used to the Spanish pronunciation easily.


If you have any questions, please let me know.


Thank you,

Jae

Team SpanishPod101.com

Carrie
Wednesday at 6:24 pm
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Maybe it's because I'm transferring from English to Spanish. Does it occur more over time? I still want to distinguish each word. Is that because I'm just starting?