Dialogue

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Natalia: Buenos días me llamo Natalia.
Carlos: What’s up, I am Carlos.
Natalia: Costa Rican Spanish series, lesson 18.
Carlos: St. Peter’s Moving the Furniture Around.
Natalia: Hi everybody, this is Natalia again.
Carlos: And what’s going on? I am Carlos, Natie has the week been good to you so far?
Natalia: Oh it’s been beautiful Carlos, how about you?
Carlos: Man, can it be better? Natie, we have reached a milestone today.
Natalia: A milestone?
Carlos: Yeah didn’t you realize?
Natalia: What?
Carlos: We are in lesson #18. We are legal.
Natalia: Ay Carlos, qué comparaciones.
Carlos: We can now bring more mature air to our SpanishPod101.com regional series.
Natalia: Okay. Now you are going to get us in trouble.
Carlos: Soon, we will be off the college. How time flies!
Natalia: Umm remember when I told you about beating jokes to death.
Carlos: Yeah I know, this one I’ve taken a baseball bat too.
Natalia: So what are we looking at today?
Carlos: Well today we are going to continue our discussion of weather.
Natalia: Who is in our conversation today?
Carlos: Today we meet Niguel and Lucia who are looking at the sky with worry.
Natalia: And why are they worried?
Carlos: Because it looks like it’s going to rain.
Natalia: Well it rains every day, it probably will.
Carlos: Not everywhere, it’s like the land of extremes you call home.
Natalia: The land of extremes is a safe bet, rain or sun?
Carlos: As always, we have some Costa Rican lingo to get you through.
Natalia: Carlos, I think it’s about time we get into today’s lesson but first let’s look back at newbie lesson 18 where we heard the following conversation.
DIALOGUE
CARMEN: ¿Está lloviendo?
PAOLA: No. No es lluvia; es llovizna.
CARMEN: Mira, las gotas son chiquititas. ¿Las ves?
PAOLA: Sí, las veo, pero tampoco es llovizna. Es garúa.
CARMEN: Ya veo, Paola. Es garúa y es muy misteriosa.
Carlos: This time with a translation. Ahora incluiremos la traducción.
CARMEN: ¿Está lloviendo? Is it raining?
PAOLA: No. No es lluvia; es llovizna.
Carlos: No it’s not rain, it’s a drizzle.
CARMEN: Mira, las gotas son chiquititas. ¿Las ves? Look, the raindrops are tiny, do you see them?
PAOLA: Sí, las veo, pero tampoco es llovizna. Es garúa.
Carlos: Yeah I see them but it’s not a drizzle either, it’s mist.
CARMEN: Ya veo, Paola. Es garúa y es muy misteriosa. Now I get it Paola it’s mist and it’s very mysterious.
Carlos: Now, let’s hear that conversation in the Tico way.
DIALOGUE - COSTA RICAN
MIGUEL: Mae, ya viene el agua.
LUCIA: Son pelitos de gato nada mas.
MIGUEL: No mãe, San Pedro está corriendo los muebles
LUCIA: ¡Qué exagerado!
MIGUEL: Bueno, nadamas busque paraguas.
Carlos: Once again slowly. Una vez más, esta vez lentamente.
MIGUEL: Mae, ya viene el agua.
LUCIA: Son pelitos de gato nada mas.
MIGUEL: No mãe, San Pedro está corriendo los muebles
LUCIA: ¡Qué exagerado!
MIGUEL: Bueno, nadamas busque paraguas.
Carlos: This time with the translation. Ahora incluiremos la traducción.
MIGUEL: Mae, ya viene el agua. Man, the rain is on its way.
LUCIA: Son pelitos de gato nada mas. It’s just little cat hairs.
MIGUEL: No mãe, San Pedro está corriendo los muebles. No man, St. Peter’s moving furniture around.
LUCIA: ¡Qué exagerado! How exaggerated.
MIGUEL: Bueno, nadamas busque paraguas. Well just get the umbrella.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Carlos: I have to reiterate the fact to our audience. Natie, I don’t think I have ever truly seen rain until I moved down here. I mean it’s on a different level.
Natalia: Oh Carlos, don’t be dramatic. Just get a giant, giant, giant umbrella and you will be fine.
Carlos: No it’s just funny because there is no question of whether it’s going to rain or not in the rainy season. It just does.
Natalia: Yeah you have to tell me right. Usually throughout the season, it only rains during the afternoon. During the morning and the night, it usually clears up.
Carlos: Alright. So when the majority of people are out and about, that’s when it rains the hardest.
Natalia: Right usually right when you get out of work.
Carlos: Man, that’s like some sort of sick joke.
Natalia: I know but well you can handle that. Where would you like to start our comparisons today?
Carlos: Well actually my choice today has to do with geography.
Natalia: Okay.
Carlos: Well let’s look at the first line of the newbie conversation.
Natalia: ¿Está lloviendo? Is it raining? ¿Está lloviendo?
Natalia: Well that’s a pretty basic question Carlos. Why do you want to look at that?
Carlos: Well hold on Natie, there is a method to my madness.
Natalia: I doubt that.
Carlos: Anyway, what is the first line of our Tico conversation?
Natalia: Mae, ya viene el agua.
Carlos: Man, the rain is on its way.
Natalia: Carlos, you really lost me for a minute and if you lost me, I guarantee you’ve lost the audience.
Carlos: Okay, okay here it comes. Now the newbie conversation as the audience already knows because they listen to it took place in Lima Peru. Nati, have you ever been to Lima?
Natalia: I was in Lima like for 2 hours.
Carlos: In the airport.
Natalia: Yes.
Carlos: Alright actually I went to visit Joe from the Peruvian and verb conjugation series a couple of years ago for a couple of weeks and I stayed at his place in Lima and let me tell you, it was always, always cloudy and yet it never rained.
Natalia: Al chile.
Carlos: En serio. It was like the clouds were teasing me. I used to ask Joe if we needed an umbrella and he said no, it doesn’t rain.
Natalia: Okay Carlos, maybe you didn’t catch my sarcasm in that “Al chile” but it was. So you are saying it never rains in Lima.
Carlos: No it doesn’t. Not at least when I was there but let’s look at the Tico conversation and why I think it’s different.
Natalia: Okay let’s see.
Carlos: What is the first line of Tico conversation again?
Natalia: I already told you “Mae, ya viene el agua.”
Carlos: And why was it changed that way because the question
Natalia: ¿Está lloviendo? Is it raining?
Carlos: Is about possibility and when talking about rain in Costa Rica, we might say
Natalia: Mae, ya viene el agua.
Carlos: Man, the rain is on its way. See, there is no question, it’s certain “ya viene” it’s coming, no question about it.
Natalia: You hear that. He actually had a point.
Carlos: Thank you.
Natalia: Okay I am going to write that down. Moment history, would you like to make a comparison?
Carlos: Sure why not. How about “lluvia” and “lluvisna”
Natalia: Llovizna. No es lluvia, es llovizna. Okay rain and the word I learned in the past lesson, drizzle.
Carlos: Fo’ shizzle. Yeah there was some interesting change in the Costa Rican conversation.
DIALOGUE - COSTA RICAN
Natalia: Son pelitos de gato nada mas.
Carlos: It’s just little cat hairs. Seriously, what is the obsession with cats and rain?
Natalia: What do you mean?
Carlos: Well in English, we have the saying it’s raining cats and dogs and I’ve never understood that and now we have “son pelitos de gatos” I mean rain becomes little cat hairs. Actually this is kind of a disgusting image.
Natalia: No why?
Carlos: Have you ever smelled a wet cat?
Natalia: I have.
Carlos: Okay now I don’t know. It’s like a cat is being shaken around in the sky and it’s nasty loose hairs are falling out.
Natalia: Well that’s if you take it literally.
Carlos: I am just saying, it’s the image on my mind but do you think these two phrases are related Natie.
Natalia: It could be because well, when you say in English, it’s raining cats and dogs, it’s when its pouring a lot of water but when you say it’s little cat hairs, then you can see the drizzle but it’s just a little bit, not the whole cat, just the hairs.
Carlos: Okay. So audience, if you find yourself in Costa Rica and you think it’s only going to drizzle which is highly unlikely, you might say
Natalia: Son pelitos de gato nada mas.
Carlos: Well that’s nasty.
Natalia: Oh it’s not.
Carlos: And now it’s time for localisms. For the first time ever legal.
Natalia: ¡Híjole! You have just dug up the jokes body, resurrected it with voodoo and then beat it to death again Carlos.
Carlos: Okay it’s funny to me in how they are similar sayings in different languages.
Natalia: Like what?
Carlos: Well in the States when I was a kid, we used to say that thunder was God bowling.
Natalia: Yeah and here we would say “No mãe, San Pedro está corriendo los muebles”
Carlos: Right. St. Peter is moving furniture around. Too funny images.
Natalia: So that means today we have two phrases that are related.
Carlos: Yeah God is bowling and “San Pedro está corriendo los muebles” the wet cat hair one.
Natalia: You hear that, Carlos doesn’t like cats.
Carlos: I love cats but….
Natalia: No I think I just got it. You are exaggerating.
Carlos: Hah you fell into my trap muah!
Natalia: Oh Carlos, try harder.
Carlos: I think that the word “exagerado” should be explored. I mean, if I am not wrong, this isn’t exactly a tiquicio.
Natalia: Now you are right “exagerado” is used throughout the Spanish speaking world.
Carlos: So it means exaggerated.
Natalia: Yeah.
Carlos: How about an example?
Natalia: No seas exagerado Carlos.
Carlos: Don’t exaggerate Carlos.
Natalia: Exactly. Don’t exaggerate, don’t be so dramatic.
Carlos: Man, I walked into that one.
Natalia: Only fair.
Carlos: Question.
Natalia: Answers as soon as you ask.
Carlos: “Nadamas.” In the conversation, it’s spelled as one word.
Natalia: Yes.
Carlos: Well isn’t it “nada” “mas” as in two words?
Natalia: Usually but here we spell it as one word because of the pronunciation.
Carlos: Nadamas
Natalia: “Nadamas”. What else would you like to go through today?
Carlos: Nadamas.
Natalia: Uh okay. You see, you got it. So then I guess this will conclude today’s lesson. Don’t forget to reference this lesson with newbie lesson 18 and be sure to pick up the PDF at spanishpod101.com Also leave us some love on the forum or comment on today’s lesson.
OUTRO
Carlos: Let us know what you liked and what you didn’t like. We will see you again tomorrow.
Natalia: Nos vemos pronto.

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Dialogue - Costa Rican

Dialogue - Standard

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SpanishPod101.com
Tuesday at 6:30 pm
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Thanks to Kevin Macleod for the music in today's lesson! Wow, it sounds like the rain can get pretty intense in Costa Rica! I guess that's why much of the country is part of "la selva tropical" (Rainforest). Anyone gone on a trip or lived in a tropical region such as Costa Rica where the rain can get really extreme? What was it like?

Carlos
Friday at 11:58 pm
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Chris,

Thanks a lot for the positive feedback! We appreciate it.


Carlos

Joseph
Sunday at 12:11 am
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I can't think of a phrase particular to pets with reference to the rain, but I like the expression "llover a cántaros", which is literally "to rain pitchers"... Hehe...


I think, as long as we're talking about the rain, we should also point out that the verb "llover" is "un verbo terciopersonal o impersonal". This means that it's only ever conjugated to the third person singular form, not matter the tense or mood.


¡chau!

Joseph

Carlos
Wednesday at 1:37 am
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So in todays conversation we heard a phrase in English and a phrase in Spanish that seem related.


"It's raining cats and dogs." and "Son pelitos de gato" Does anyone know any other phrases in Spanish that concerns raining and pets?