Dialogue

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Natalia: Buenos días me llamo Natalia.
Carlos: What’s up, I am Carlos.
Natalia: Costa Rican Spanish series, lesson 12.
Carlos: I’m Popping the Cork. What’s good, I am Carlos.
Natalia: Hola Carlos.
Carlos: Natie, all in all, how is life treating you.
Natalia: A super bien, por dicho.
Carlos: As always, good to hear. You know, time sure does move quickly.
Natalia: I know. We are already in lesson #12.
Carlos: You know, it seems like only yesterday where we said the words Bienvenidos at spanishpod101.com for the first time.
Natalia: My god, now he is getting sentimental.
Carlos: I am just saying, this project, I was almost a teenager I mean. You know, all those years are the hardest.
Natalia: Uhoo….
Carlos: No I am serious. We’ve reached the stretch.
Natalia: Uhoo. So let’s keep going Carlos.
Carlos: Natie, if you insist. What are we looking at today?
Natalia: Well today’s lesson is the funny one.
Carlos: Why is that?
Natalia: We are going to hear some of the phrases that I think are very interesting and funny here.
Carlos: Like?
Natalia: Well, without spoiling it too much “ya estoy como la perrita del cura”.
Carlos: Wow, I recognize “perrita” but the rest
Natalia: Well, you need to wait.
Carlos: Always waiting.
Natalia: Well before we get into today’s lesson, what did we look at last week.
Carlos: Last week we had “En la cocina con Natalia Araya”.
Natalia: Oh how could I forget.
Carlos: In addition to the recipe for “gallo de picadillo de papa y chifrijo” we also had a very interesting grammar lesson about possessive adjectives.
Natalia: Umm that I did not forget.
Carlos: Is that enough of a recap?
Natalia: It is.
Carlos: Good. Now let’s get into today’s lesson.
Natalia: To get the ball rolling, let’s go back to newbie lesson 12 where we heard the following conversation.
DIALOGUE
TÍA ROSA: ¿Quieres más, Felipe?
FELIPE: No, gracias, tía. Ya estoy lleno.
TÍA ROSA: ¿Y tú, Juana?
JUANA: Estoy satisfecha. Usted prepara muy bien el cebiche.
TÍA ROSA: ¿Ustedes están seguros?
FELIPE: Gracias tía, pero estamos repletos.
Carlos: This time, with the translation. Ahora incluiremos la traducción.
Natalia: ¿Quieres más, Felipe? Do you want more, Felipe?
Carlos: No, gracias, tía. Ya estoy lleno. No thanks aunt Rosa I am full.
Natalia: ¿Y tú, Juana? And you Juana.
Natalia: Estoy satisfecha. Usted prepara muy bien el cebiche.
Carlos: I am satisfied, you prepared the cebiche very well.
Natalia: ¿Ustedes están seguros? Are you all sure?
Carlos: Gracias tía, pero estamos repletos. Thank you aunt Rosa but we are stuffed.
Natalia: So basically that conversation will be understood anywhere in the Spanish speaking world.
Carlos: That’s right but now, let’s hear what this might sound like in the Spanish spoken in Costa Rica.
DIALOGUE - COSTA RICAN
ALICIA: ¿Quique, te puedo ofrecer un poco más?
ENRIQUE: No, ya estoy como la perrita del cura
ALICIA: No seas tímido. ¿Qué tal una cajeta?
ENRIQUE: De verdad, estoy hasta el alma.
ALICIA: ¿En serio?
ENRIQUE: Gracias tía, pero estoy botando el tapón.
Carlos: Once again slowly. Una vez más, esta vez lentamente.
ALICIA: ¿Quique, te puedo ofrecer un poco más?
ENRIQUE: No, ya estoy como la perrita del cura
ALICIA: No seas tímido. ¿Qué tal una cajeta?
ENRIQUE: De verdad, estoy hasta el alma.
ALICIA: ¿En serio?
ENRIQUE: Gracias tía, pero estoy botando el tapón.
Carlos: This time with the translation. Ahora incluiremos la traducción.
ALICIA: ¿Quique, te puedo ofrecer un poco más? Can I offer you a bit more?
ENRIQUE: No, ya estoy como la perrita del cura. No I am like the priest’s little dog.
ALICIA: No seas tímido. ¿Qué tal una cajeta? Don’t be shy, how about some fudge?
ENRIQUE: De verdad, estoy hasta el alma. Really, I am up to here.
ALICIA: ¿En serio? Seriously
ENRIQUE: Gracias tía, pero estoy botando el tapón. Thanks aunt Alicia but I am popping the cork.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Carlos: Oh man, that conversation is too much.
Natalia: I know I told you.
Carlos: I mean seriously there are a lot of interesting phrases. I can’t wait to learn to use some of them.
Natalia: That’s good, Carlos.
Carlos: No seriously, I love the look people give me when I come out with something that I learned here and that’s probably because I am not saying it correctly but they kind of get what I mean.
Natalia: I know it’s pretty cool to find someone and then see that at least they are trying, you know.
Carlos: Well when you are right, you are right and where do you think we should start today?
Natalia: Well let’s start off with the way “thanks on Rosa I am full” was expressed in newbie lesson 12.
Carlos: That sounds good to me. So in newbie lesson 12, we heard
Carlos: “Ya estoy lleno” I am full.
Carlos: Ya estoy lleno.
Natalia: And in our Tica conversation, we heard
Carlos: Ya estoy como la perrita del cura. What does that mean?
Natalia: Well that means I am like the priest’s little dog.
Carlos: Okay see, I knew that “perrita” meant dog in the diminutive form.
Natalia: Carlos, if there is anything that I know that you’ve learned from spanishpod101, it is diminutive.
Carlos: Well that’s the truth but seriously I mean what does the priest’s little dog have to do with being full?
Natalia: Well just picture this. Let’s picture a little time with the little church and the priest has a little dog. So all the ladies that go to pray there, they always give things to the little dog plus the priest takes good care of the little dog. So pretty much next time you are in a church in Costa Rica, watch out for dogs around it and you will see people feed them.
Carlos: Well you know what, that does make sense. So really it’s like a real small-town feel. I mean honestly you don’t get that where I come from. I mean they kick away stray dogs.
Natalia: Don’t forget Carlos. Costa Rica is a predominantly catholic country. The priest is an important part of the community.
Carlos: Oh you know that would explain why a priest dog will be well fed.
Natalia: And why we would use it as a simile for being full.
Carlos: Oh, oh you know what, she is bringing out figures of speech. Well Natie, what may I ask is simile.
Natalia: Carlos, a simile is when two unlike things are compared using like or as.
Carlos: Okay like comparing being full with being like a priest’s little dog.
Natalia: Exactly. Ya estoy como la perrita del cura.
Carlos: You know Natie, another Spanish simile would really clarify things.
Natalia: Well I got a good one. Ya estoy como la loca tejiendo.
Carlos: What does that mean?
Natalia: That’s my daily basis. It is sort of like I am like the mad woman meeting, so I am all messed up.
Carlos: Wow, you have no idea how true that is listeners. Natie, this is the perfect opportunity to bring up something that I am kind of confused about.
Natalia: Yeah change the topic and what is that Carlos?
Carlos: That will be the difference between “como” and “cómo”
Natalia: That is something good to know. Well “cómo” with an accent over the first O indicates a question.
Carlos: Okay like ¿Cómo está usted?”
Natalia: Exactly.
Carlos: Or “¿Cómo le fue el fin de semana?”
Natalia: Right. How did your weekend go?
Carlos: So what about “como” without an accent?
Natalia: Well here “como” is used as like.
Carlos: Well Natie, could you provide another example?
Natalia: Okay maybe: “Ella como siempre feliz”, she is like always happy.
Carlos: Okay could you provide an example?
Natalia: Well I remember the other lesson where we heard “Seco como el desierto”.
Carlos: Dry like the desert.
Natalia: Uhoo….
Carlos: Oh okay, well Natie, thanks for clarifying.
Natalia: Con mucho gusto Carlos.
Carlos: Now like any good Latina especially a Latin mother or aunt, at least she is trying to get Enrique to eat more.
Natalia: That’s my daily life man. My grandmother, mom, everybody just tells me eat, eat, eat, eat more and they won’t take no for an answer. Believe me, this is a very, very common trait. In newbie lesson 12, we heard “¿UStedes están seguros?” Are you all sure and in our Tico lesson, we heard
Carlos: “¿En serio?” Seriously or really. I mean it’s like she is trying to persuade him.
Natalia: Yeah here “en serio” is like really.
Carlos: You know I hear “en serio” all the time down here. I mean it seems to be very popular but isn’t that similar to “al chile”. I mean don’t they kind of mean the same thing?
Natalia: They sure do but “al chile” is more of a youthful expression than “en serio”.
Carlos: Okay I see. So depending on my company, I could use either “al chile” or “en serio”.
Natalia: Definitely.
Carlos: I think that it’s safe to say that Quique is full. I mean he has said it a couple of times.
Natalia: Yeah but I think the aunt is probably holding a broom and saying “¿En serio?” No, did you know that actually Carlos, some people get offended if you don’t eat your whole meal?
Carlos: Ah really, that doesn’t happen in the states.
Natalia: Well if you go to my house and you eat food from my grandma and you just leave a little bit in the plate, she is going to be like – he didn’t like it.
Carlos: I guess I will make sure to lick the plate then.
Natalia: All right.
Carlos: I mean, Felipe expresses the same thing in newbie lesson 12 where we heard “Gracias tía pero estamos repletos.”
Carlos: Thank you aunt Rosa but we are stuffed.
Carlos: And in our Tico conversation, we heard
Natalia: Gracias tía pero estoy botando el tapón. Carlos, you are just funny today or what?
Carlos: Oh I am sorry. No I am in a mood, I am in a mood. Thanks aunt Alicia but I am popping the cork. That is...
Natalia: Okay that’s one….
Carlos: Don’t interrupt me. I am going to use that in English from now on like seriously like dude, no I mean and I am popping the cork.
Natalia: This is one of my favorite phrases. This is very expressive. I mean, when you say that, someone knows that you are really, really seriously full.
Carlos: I am sure but we also have another point that comes up in the phrase.
Natalia: What’s that?
Carlos: “botando” And I know that if I see ando, the gerund of the verb is being used.
Natalia: Right, here we are using the verb “botar” which can mean to put out, kick out. In this sense, the general effect is removal.
Carlos: I see but you know what Natie as always, another example would help.
Natalia: Well let’s go back to another lesson then. Remember when we use “jale”. So let’s say “Jale a comer”. Let’s go eat.
Carlos: Interesting. You know, not that I am supposed to play favorites but like Natie I really like localisms. I mean no offence comparison section but you just don’t do it for me.
Natalia: This man needs coffee.
Carlos: That will make me even more energetic but now….
Natalia: I am not even going to attempt to respond to that.
Carlos: No, no, no I am being serious. I always have fun with localisms. I mean it’s almost like a light dessert after a heavy meal, a grammar and comparisons.
Natalia: That’s a lot of ramble but I think I somehow get to you. I am hanging out too much with you.
Carlos: What! I am just voicing my opinion.
Natalia: Okay well, are you going to ask me about “cajeta”.
Carlos: I can’t help it but you know since you brought it up, what is a “cajeta”.
Natalia: Well I am first going to say you that I make the best “cajeta” and the second thing I am going to say is that “cajeta” is similar to fudge.
Carlos: Or “cajeta es como fudge”.
Natalia: He’s paying attention, you see.
Carlos: Well I like fudge.
Natalia: You like “cajeta” too.
Carlos: I never had one.
Natalia: You know Carlos, how much stuff do you eat when you have no idea what it is. The other day I gave you like a giant “cajeta” man and you ate it.
Carlos: What, really?
Natalia: Don’t you remember?
Carlos: I guess I don’t, hold on.
Natalia: Carlos, I am never giving you anything ever again in my life.
Carlos: Okay. What – it is not like it’s a dinner food. I mean I would know when I am eating something like fudge. I know what a fudge is. It is like chocolate or vanilla with like almonds.
Natalia: Let me talk. Remember that day, we were in a cab and I gave you something that looked like a cookie?
Carlos: Yeah it was a cookie. I mean it was an interesting cookie. It was delicious.
Natalia: Again that was a “cajeta” Carlos.
Carlos: Really, well that seemed like more like a cookie than a fudge. I mean what’s in your purse Natie? Did you get me a “cajeta”?
Natalia: No, no don’t even look at my purse. Let’s go back to “cajeta” Carlos.
Carlos: Okay back to “cajeta”.
Natalia: When you make it, it’s similar to fudge.
Carlos: Yeah Natie, you walked right into that one.
Natalia: Walk right into what?
Carlos: Hoy en la cocina con Natalia Araya estamos preparando la famosa cajeta.
Natalia: Oh my god! I am just going to get an Apron and got to book deal and go like in food network.
Carlos: I can just see you are at food network right now, man! RachaelRay, watch out.
Natalia: Okay well, “cajeta” man, I love cajeta. It’s pretty much like a sugar fudge and you can use coconut. So I am just going to explain how it’s made.
Carlos: Okay I am listening.
Natalia: Well, the thing is, you grab a pod, you put it on the fire and then you put one part milk, three parts sugar and then you just let it to boil.
Carlos: Oh my god, I feel my teeth hurting already but it hurts so good.
Natalia: Dude!
Carlos: I was joking.
Natalia: Okay I am just going to keep going. Then you start mixing that, I am telling you. You are mixing these for like two hours or more. So you just do it so the milk you know, when the milk boils, it just pours out. What you are doing when mixing is just stopping the mixture to pour out. You just mix and mix and mix and mix and mix. While you mix, you see that this is just getting like into a thicker paste. You know it’s ready when you just go with the spoon in the middle and you see the bottom of the pod.
Carlos: Oh you know, I can see that, I can see that. So it gets like really, really thick almost like a batter and then you can mix it and see the bottom of the pod is what you are saying.
Natalia: Uhoo…
Carlos: Okay now the one I had – that very delicious one that I do remember Natie, I had coke and nut. Can we add anything else?
Natalia: Well, you can add chocolate or whatever you want but the thing is, you do that before doing the home mixing. While you are mixing, you then pour the coconut. When the fudge is ready that you just pour it on a wooden table or a wooden chopping board, just let it there to cool off a little. Then you just cut whatever shapes you want. Put it in the fridge and then you can start eating when it’s cold.
Carlos: Okay this wraps up the today’s lesson.
OUTRO
Natalia: Be sure to reference this lesson with newbie lesson 12.
Carlos: And Peruvian lesson 12 where Bea and Joseph show us what’s what with the South American feel.
Natalia: And don’t forget to try Megan and David’s Iberian lessons.
Carlos: Yeah they are really cruising. It’s so cool that they load on the European Spanish too. All right, be cool. Show us some love and post the comment. We will see you soon.
Natalia: Nos vemos pronto.

Dialogue - Costa Rican

Dialogue - Standard

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SpanishPod101.com
Friday at 6:30 pm
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Thanks to Kevin MacLeod for the music used in today's lesson. So, now that you've checked out these three Regional Lessons, what are some of the differences that you can see?

steven
Saturday at 8:03 am
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I would probably love Natalia's cajetas.


There is a couple of typos in the transcript.


Natalia: Well, the thing is, you grab a pod, you put it on the fire and then you put one part milk, three parts sugar and then you just let it to boil.

...

you mix, you see that this is just getting like into a thicker paste. You know it’s ready hen you just go with the spoon in the middle and you see the bottom of the pod.


In both cases, I believe Natalia says "pot" not "pod"