Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Beatriz: Buenos días me llamo Beatriz.
Joseph: Joseph here! Peruvian Spanish Series, Lesson 7 – “I’m from right around here” Hi there! My name’s Joseph!
Beatriz: And I’m Beatrice!
Joseph: Welcome to the seventh lesson of the Peruvian Spanish Series in Spanishpod101.com where we cover pronunciation and intonation proper to the Spanish of Peru by comparing Peruvian speech to the standard Spanish taught in the core curriculum of Spanishpod101. We give you the insider’s perspective on Peruvian Spanish and we contextualize it for you by explaining Peruvian customs.
Beatriz: So, join us for this lesson of the Spanishpod101.com!
Joseph: Last time, we heard what the Peruvian highland accent sounds like. And we also studied the verb “ser” when it refers to origin and the verb “estar” when it refers to location. Today, we’re going to hear a Coastal accent from the city of Chincha where some of the best Peruvian wine and peasecod comes from. Don’t forget to reference this lesson with Newbie Lesson 7 for a deeper comparison. In today’s lesson, we’ll pay a particular attention to the question “¿De qué ciudad es usted?” which means “What city are you from?”. Also, you can take your studies to the next level by stopping by the Learning Center at Spanishpod101.com! This is a great way to really drive home the grammar that’s taught in our lessons. So, to begin, let’s go back to Newbie Lesson 7 where we heard the following conversation:
DIALOGUE - NORMAL
SRA. ROSSI: ¿De qué país es usted?
SR. GUTIEREZ: Yo soy estadounidense. ¿Y usted, de qué país?
SRA. ROSSI: Yo soy argentina.
SR. GUTIEREZ: ¿De qué ciudad es usted?
SRA. ROSSI: Yo soy de Mendoza.
Joseph: This time with the translation! Ahora incluiremos la traducción.
SRA. ROSSI: ¿De qué país es usted?
SRA. ROSSI: “What country are you from, sir?”
SR. GUTIEREZ: Yo soy estadounidense. ¿Y usted, de qué país?
SR. GUTIEREZ: “I’m American. And you, madam? What country?”
SRA. ROSSI: Yo soy argentina.
SRA. ROSSI: “I’m Argentinean.”
SR. GUTIEREZ: ¿De qué ciudad es usted?
SR. GUTIEREZ: “What city are you from, madam?”
SRA. ROSSI: Yo soy de Mendoza.
SRA. ROSSI: “I am from Mendoza.”
DIALOGUE - PERUVIAN
Joseph: So, this conversation would be understood all throughout the Spanish speaking world. Now, let’s hear what that might sound like in Peruvian Spanish.
SRA. TASAYCO: ¿Y de qué ciudad es usted?
SR. CASAS: Soy limeño, señora, del distrito de Surco.. ¿Y usted, de qué ciudad es?
SRA. TASAYCO: ¡Ah, mire vea... de la capital! Yo soy de acá no más, de Chincha.
SR. CASAS: ¡Caray, usted es chinchana! ¡De la tierra del buen manchapecho!
SRA. TASAYCO: !Ah, sí! ¡Y de la buena cachina!
SR. CASAS: Once again, slowly! Una vez más, esta vez lentamente.
SRA. TASAYCO: ¿Y de qué ciudad es usted?
SR. CASAS: Soy limeño, señora, del distrito de Surco.. ¿Y usted, de qué ciudad es?
SRA. TASAYCO: ¡Ah, mire vea... de la capital! Yo soy de acá no más, de Chincha.
SR. CASAS: ¡Caray, usted es chinchana! ¡De la tierra del buen manchapecho!
SRA. TASAYCO: !Ah, sí! ¡Y de la buena cachina!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Joseph: So, it’s not too hard to tell that these conversations are quite a bit different. Let’s start out by looking at the way “I’m from right around here, from Chincha.” was pronounced in Peruvian Spanish. Beatrice, could you repeat that for us, please?
Beatriz: Yo soy de acá no más, de Chincha.
Joseph: “I’m from right around here, from Chincha.” Now, in Newbie Lesson 7 this is what we hear SR. GUTIEREZ:
SRA. ROSSI: Yo soy argentina.
Joseph: Beatrice, where should we start out today?
Beatriz: En primer lugar mencionaremos que la respuesta neutral explica la nacionalidad de la señora mientras la respuesta peruana el lugar.
Joseph: Good point! So, in the standard version, Sra. Rossi says “Soy argentina” which means “I’m Argentinean.” And in the Peruvian version Sra. Tasayco says “soy de acá no más, de Chincha.” which means “I’m from right around here, from [*].” So, there’s a phrase in the Peruvian version that seems very typical of Spanish as it’s spoken in Peru. Beatrice, do you know which one I’m talking about?
Beatriz: Are you talking about “nomás”?
Joseph: That’s the one! Now, literally “nomás” means “no more” or “not more”. But it’s used idiomatically and in this way it has many, many different meanings.
Beatriz: Claro, decimos “nomás” en muchísimas ocasiones y en este caso cuando hablamos del espacio y de las distancias.
Joseph: So, as you say, this expression is used all the time. And in this case, when we’re talking about spaces and distances.
Beatriz: Así es. En el Perú solemos decir que los lugares quedan más cerca de lo que la otra persona podría imaginar. Muchas veces se refiere a una aproximación muy vaga y otras no.
Joseph: That’s a pretty interesting idiom synchrony. So, in Peru, people tend to say that places are closer than they really are or it’s a way of approximating where something really is.
Beatriz: Por eso dice la Sra. Tasayco “acá no más”.
Joseph: “Aca no más”.
Beatriz: Muy bien.
Joseph: Gracias. Now, when we translate this into English, it can take shape in a number of ways. For example, if we say “Dime”, it means “Tell me!”, but if we say “Dime no más” it’s like saying “Just tell me!”
Beatriz: Bien dicho Joseph. También usamos “no más” con expresiones de tiempo. Por ejemplo decimo “ahorita no más”.
Joseph: That’s a good example! So, Beatrice, as you’re saying, the phrase “no más” is also used with expressions of time as in “ahorita no más” just like that sound by Eva John, no?
Beatriz: Right! But she says “Hay ‘ta no má’”.
Joseph: It’s a pretty strong accent there. So, now that we’ve considered this expression, too, it seems like we can say that the phrase “no más” refers to proximity in space or time.
Beatriz: Eso me suena mejor.
Joseph: Sí a mi me parece más preciso también. So, again, in the standard version Sra. Rossi says:
SRA. ROSSI: Yo soy argentina.
Joseph: And in the Peruvian Spanish version we hear:
Beatriz: Yo soy de acá no más, de Chincha.
Joseph: “I’m from right around here, from Chincha.” Now, it’s time to go over some of the localisms that came up in the conversation. To begin, we’ll look at the expression “mire vea”. Beatrice, would you take us back to where this came up in the Peruvian Spanish conversation?
Beatriz: ¡Ah, mire vea... de la capital!
Joseph: “Well, would you look at that, from the capital!” Now, we know that an idiom is a phrase that can be understood by adding up the meanings of each of its elements. So, Beatrice, what exactly can we understand by the expression “mire vea”?
Beatriz: Bueno la expresión está compuesta por dos verbos: “mirar” y “ver”. Ambos conjugados en la tercera persona singular del modo imperativo.
Joseph: Right! This expression is made up of two verbs: “mirar” “to look at” and “ver” “to see”, both conjugated to the third person, singular, of the Imperative Mood. But you know, this meaning sound a little redundant, don’t you think?
Beatriz: Oh, no! Yo no diría que es una expresión redundante sino juguetona y muy provinciana.
Joseph: I see! So, it may sound redundant, but it’s really playful and also provincial. We should also mention that this is the formal Imperative, that’s the formal command. You can use this phrase informally, as well. Beatrice, if we were to say this informally, how would the expression sound?
Beatriz: “Mira ve”
Joseph: Right! So, in the formal version we say “Mire vea” and in the informal version we say “Mira ve”. You can tell that both of these expressions show surprise, kind of like the English phrase “Well, would you look at that!” or “How about that?”
Beatriz: Es algo parecido, además informalmente usamos la expresion “Mira tú”.
Joseph: That’s a nice one! I’m glad you pointed that one out. The expression “Mira tú” literally means “Look, you!” but its meaning it’s different than this, no?
Beatriz: Claro, ambas frases se usan como un preludio a una explicación o como una exclamación de sorpresa.
Joseph: Good point! So, both of these phrases can be used as a prefix to an explanation or as an exclamation of surprise. Wow, those are two good expressions to have learned. Now, Beatrice, there are a couple of other words that I think we should mention today. I’m talking about “manchapecho” and “cachina”. So, let me ask you. What is “manchapecho”?
Beatriz: Bueno “manchapecho” es una comida típica de la provincia que significa “manchar el pecho” ya que está compuesta de ají muy rojo y semillas muy rojas que manchan el pecho.
Joseph: Okay! “Manchapecho” is a typical food from the provinces, very popular in Chincha and it’s called “mancha” means “to stain” and “pecho” means “chest”. So, the idea of “manchapecho” is that it’s food that’s going to stain your clothes because it’s made of “ají” “a chili” that’s very red and “a seed” a “achiote” which also turns the food very red. So, that is a really cool localism to learn, Beatrice! This is really great to expose our students to. So, now, let’s talk about one more word. “Cachina” Beatrice, what is “cachina”?
Beatriz: Bueno la cachina es un vino joven que se consume generalmente en la Vendimia, en la provincia de Chincha, Inca y otras provincias que se encuentran al sur del país.
OUTRO
Joseph: I see! So, “cachina” is just a young wine which is generally consumed during Vendimia or the great progress in Chincha and other wine growing provinces in the South. So, in Peru, wine production is much lower than the production of “pisco” which is similar to brandy or “grapa”. In fact, contrary to the Italian production of “grapa”, “pisco” is produced with the best grapes and not with the leftover of the grapes used for wine, kind of interesting headers to differ. Well, this just about wraps up today’s lesson! Be sure to reference this lesson with Newbie Lesson 7! And don’t forget to try out the Spanish Review in the Learning Center where you will find test questions, answers and comments on the answers. It’s a great way to start practicing on your own. Okay, until next time.
Beatriz: ¡Hasta la próxima!

Dialogue - Peruvian

Dialogue - Standard

6 Comments

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SpanishPod101.com
Friday at 6:30 pm
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Has anyone ever seen the famous "zapateo" that's danced in Chincha or El Carmen? It's amazing! The "zapateo" is a kind of "tap dancing", made famous by Afro-Peruvians and now renown in the modern day Creole culture.

SpanishPod101.comVerified
Friday at 1:46 pm
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Hello Steven,


Thank you once again for discovering another problem.


We have changed the listed sentences, so the audio does not confuse anyone. We are sorry for the inconvenience.


Let us know if you have any question,

Sincerely,

Stan

Team SpanishPod101.com

SpanishPod101.comVerified
Sunday at 4:37 am
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Hola Steven,


Thank you for your feedback!

We'll fix this issue ASAP.

Let's keep practicing. :wink:


Saludos,

Carla

Team SpanishPod101.com

steven dirks
Thursday at 1:27 pm
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There is a problem for the audio for one of the expanded vocab examples:


Siempre tomo la cachina durante la vindimia


When you click on the icons to play or record the example, the audio stops after the word "cachina"

Joseph
Saturday at 3:24 am
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Waterman,


Glad to see you're still around! Yes, we'll be publishing more Regional Lessons from now on, with one Audio Blog on Sundays... We're also talking about coming out with an Audio Blog for Beginners. Is this something that would interest you? If so, what would you like to see in it? Thanks for you help!


Best,

Joseph

watermen
Friday at 11:46 pm
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I love the idea you all have newbie, beginner and regional side by side everyday. I am so glad and happy there is no more audio blog.