Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Beatriz: Buenos días, me llamo Beatriz.
Joseph: Joseph here! Peruvian Spanish Series, Lesson 6 - Ah ya entiendo, papi. Hi there! I’m Joseph! I’m here with Beatrice and we’d like to welcome you to the sixth lesson of the Peruvian Spanish Series in Spanishpod101.com, the only place where you get podcast adapted to the Spanish of Peru.
Beatriz: Así es. That’s right! Here, we reference the core curriculum of Spanishpod101 and show how it applies to Peruvian Spanish.
Joseph: We’ll also shed light on words and idiomatic phrases proper to Peru.
Beatriz: Showing you how these are pronounced with an authentic Peruvian accent.
Joseph: And giving you insight into Peruvian customs and culture. So, join us for this lesson of Spanishpod101.com! For this lesson, we’ll look at how intonation in Spanish and highly in Peru differs from the standard version we heard in Newbie Lesson 6. We’ll see the verb “ser”, when it refers to a profession and the verb “estar” when it refers to location.
Beatriz: Today, we’re going to listen to Josefina and Mateo, who meet each other in the highlands of Peru.
Joseph: And reinforce what you’ve learned by using the grammar bank of the Learning Center at Spanishpod101.com! To start off, let’s refresh our memory by revisiting the conversation from Newbie Lesson 6. Here it’s exactly what we hear
DIALOGUE - NORMAL
DIEGO: ¿Por qué estás en Ecuador?
ANN: Yo estoy en Ecuador para trabajar.
DIEGO: ¿Qué tipo de trabajo tienes?
ANN: Yo soy bióloga.
DIEGO: ¡Ah, eres científica!
Joseph: This time, with the translation! Ahora incluiremos la traducción.
DIEGO: ¿Por qué estás en Ecuador?
DIEGO: “Why are you in Ecuador?”
ANN: Yo estoy en Ecuador para trabajar.
ANN: “I’m in Ecuador to work.”
DIEGO: ¿Qué tipo de trabajo tienes?
DIEGO: “What kind of job do you have?”
ANN: Yo soy bióloga.
ANN: “I ‘m a biologist.”
DIEGO: ¡Ah, eres científica!
DIEGO: “You’re a scientist.”
DIALOGUE - PERUVIAN
Joseph: Now, let’s hear what this conversation would sound like in the Peruvian Spanish that you might hear in the highlands.
JOSEFINA: ¿Y por qué estás acá, joven?
MATEO: Estoy en el Perú por el trabajo.
JOSEFINA: ¿Y puis qué clase de trabajo tienes, ah?
MATEO: Soy biólogo.
JOSEFINA: Ah, ya entiendo, papi. ¡Trabajas con las ciencias!
Joseph: Once again, slowly! Una vez más, esta vez lentamente.
JOSEFINA: ¿Y por qué estás acá, joven?
MATEO: Estoy en el Perú por el trabajo.
JOSEFINA: ¿Y puis qué clase de trabajo tienes, ah?
MATEO: Soy biólogo.
JOSEFINA: Ah, ya entiendo, papi. ¡Trabajas con las ciencias!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Joseph: So you can see that there are some really big differences between these two conversations. To begin, let’s look at the way the question “What kind of job do you have?” was pronounced in Peruvian Spanish. Beatrice, can you repeat this for us, please?
Beatriz: ¿Y puis qué clase de trabajo tienes, ah?
Joseph: “And, so what line of work are you in?” Now, in Newbie Lesson 6, it sounded like this:
Antonio: ¿Qué tipo de trabajo tienes?
Joseph: Beatrice, what do you think are the major differences here?
Beatriz: well, I think that the intonation is really noticeable. People from the highlands in Peru sing as they speak.
Joseph: Right! And you’re from the Coast, so you’re imitating this accent, but I think you’re right. The highland accent is quite a bit more choppy than the Coastal accent. I also notice that you didn’t say “pues” but rather “puis”. What’s that all about?
Beatriz: Muchas personas de la sierra de Perú hablan quechua, el idioma de los Incas.
Joseph: Claro y también hablan Aymara en algunas partes ¿no?
Beatriz: Ah sí sí sí.
Joseph: So, in Peru, the highland accent is affected by this influence from Quechua and Aymar, both of which were the languages of the Incan Empire.
Beatriz: Claro y bueno a veces se escucha el entonación del Quechua o el Aymara también cuando hablan en español. Así que dicen “puis” en vez de “pues”.
Joseph: Wow! So, sometimes, the intonation from Quechua leaks into their Spanish just as the Aymar does. So, instead of saying “pues” they say “puis”.
Beatriz: Eso es. That’s it!
Joseph: And we should mention that “pues” is a kind of pause word and we usually translate it as “so” or “so then” and we use this pause word when we’re trying to think of the next word that we’re going to say. Okay! Once again, the standard way to ask the question we’ve been looking at here is:
Antonio: ¿Qué tipo de trabajo tienes?
Joseph: And in Peruvian Spanish we can say:
Beatriz: ¿Y puis qué clase de trabajo tienes, ah?
Joseph: “And so, what line of work are you in?” All right! Next, we’ll look at the way the question “Por qué estás aquí” was pronounced in Peruvian Spanish. Beatrice, could you repeat this for us, please?
Beatriz: ¿Y por qué estás acá, joven?
Joseph: “And why are you here, sonny?” Now, in Newbie Lesson 6, the question sounded like this:
Antonio: ¿Por qué estás en Ecuador?
Joseph: Beatrice, what can you tell us about the differences in pronunciation here?
Beatriz: Well, in the Peruvian Spanish from the highlands, the rhythm does not bounce as much as it does in Newbie Lesson 6. It sounds a little more blended together.
Joseph: Also the word “joven” is used. Now, this literally means “young man” or “young woman” or simply “youngster”, but it’s often used to show affection and respect.
Beatriz: Claro, it’s just their way of speaking.
Joseph: Good to know, Beatrice! So, again! The standard way to ask this question is:
Antonio: ¿Por qué estás en Ecuador?
Joseph: And in Peruvian Spanish we might say:
Beatriz: ¿Y por qué estás acá joven?
Joseph: “And why are you here, sonny?” Let’s go over some of the localisms that came up in the conversation. To begin, we’ll look at the expression “papi”. Beatrice, would you take us back to where this came up in the Peruvian Spanish conversation, please?
Beatriz: Ah, ya entiendo, papi.
Joseph: “Now I get it, papps!” That sure sounds funny in translation! So, the localism that we’re looking at here is “papi”. Beatrice, would you please shed some light on this very Peruvian expression for us?
Beatriz: Esta expresión es muy andina.
Joseph: It’s an Andean expression.
Beatriz: Yes! But many people from the Indies now live in Lima. So, you hear there, too.
Joseph: Entiendo. Go ahead, please!
Beatriz: La gente de la sierra acostumbra referirse con afecto a un hombre con el nombre de “papi” o “papito”.
Joseph: Very interesting, Beatrice! So, in the highlands of Peru, local people have the custom of referring to a man as “papi” or in the diminutive “papito” and literally this means “papps” or “daddy” or something along those lines.
Beatriz: Right. And they may say this to you even if they don’t know you very well.
Joseph: Wow! What kind of connotations does this carrion Peruvian Spanish, Beatrice, because in English you would definitely get some strange looks if you called someone “papi” or “daddy”, I mean especially if you didn’t know them?
Beatriz: Well, “papi” and the diminutive form “papito” are both terms of endearment.
Joseph: They’re terms of endearment. So, when you’re in the highlands of Peru, if someone says this to you, if someone says “papi” or “papito”, it means that they’re showing you their affection, that they like you.
Beatriz: Yes, this is really wrapped up in Peruvian culture.
Joseph: I see that! And there must be a word that you use in the same way for a woman, right?
Beatriz: Yes, of course! We would say “mami” or “mamita”, which you could translate as “mommy”.
Joseph: Mommy. So, you could say “Hola mamita”.
Beatriz: That’s right! And you could respond “¿Cómo estás papito?”.
Joseph: Wow, Beatrice! Having this context sure makes it easier to understand the expression. Now, if I’m not mistaken, I feel like I’ve heard the words “papi, papito, mami, mamita” en el español caribeño in the Spanish spoken in the Caribbean. Is it similar or…?
Beatriz: No, no, no! Not at all! This has another connotation, a sexual connotation that it doesn’t have in Peru.
Joseph: So, you would say that “papi” and “mami, papito, mamita” in Andean Peru don’t have a sexual connotation at all.
Beatriz: Not at all!
Joseph: But in the Caribbean, they do.
Beatriz: Yes!
Joseph: I see!

Outro

Beatriz: Well, we’ll stop here for today!
Joseph: To further compare what we’ve covered here, check out Newbie Lesson 6 and be sure to quiz yourself on grammar and vocabulary in the Learning Center at Spanishpod101.com.

Dialogue - Peruvian

Dialogue - Standard

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After having listened to these two conversations, what are some of the major differences that you picked up?