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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Beatriz: Buen día, soy Bea.
Joseph: What’s up? I’m Joseph. Peruvian Spanish Series, Lesson 31 – “And now they want us to get married!”
Beatriz: Hey, what’s up? ¿Qué tal todo el mundo?
Joseph: Muy bienvenidos a otra lección del ciclo perunao, transmitiendo desde SpanishPod101.com
Beatriz: You’re listening to the 24th lesson of the Peruvian Regional Series.
Joseph: Today, Bea, we have another romance lesson, Lesson #31.
Beatriz: ¡Uy uy uy! ¿Y de qué se trata ahora?
Joseph: Well, this one is about when the family pressures a young couple to get married.
Beatriz: Si tienes una enamorada o un enamorado por mucho tiempo, ahí empieza la presión compadre.
Joseph: That’s right, that’s right! Want to was someone else for a little while, man the family just gets on you. All right! So, last time, Valentina blew up Federico spot when she found out that he had been cheating on her. And what’s worse, with her sister.
Beatriz: La bomba. Es algo que es mal visto, pues no… Un tema para el chisme.
Joseph: Exactly, exactly! Now, today as we said, we’re going to be talking about the pressures that most young people in Peru face when the family starts to strategically encourage them to get married.
Beatriz: And what about the grammar? ¿Qué nos toca hoy día?
Joseph: Well, today we’re going to learn how to express an action that someone wants to happen. And to do this, we’ll be using the Present Tense, so you know it’s going to be easy.
Beatriz: Bueno amigos, no dejen de hacer click en el botón de su iPod para ver la transcripción de hoy en la pantalla.
Joseph: And don’t forget that this lesson reference Newbie Lesson 31 and the 31st lesson of the Iberian and Costa Rican Series. So, make the complete cross reference and see how Spanish is actually spoken.
Beatriz: Okay! Vamos a la conversación.
Joseph: Here we go! So, back in Newbie Lesson 31, this is what we heard:
DIALOGUE - NORMAL
ELIANA: Ernesto, toda mi familia hace la misma pregunta.
ERNESTO: ¿Qué cosa?
ELIANA: ¿Cuándo, Ernesto, cúando?
ERNESTO: ¿Cuándo qué?
ELIANA: ¿Cuándo nos formalizamos?
ERNESTO: Por tí, amor, hago cualquier cosa.
Joseph: And now with the translation! Ahora incluiremos la traducción.
ELIANA: Ernesto, toda mi familia hace la misma pregunta.
ELIANA: “Ernesto, my whole family is asking the same question.”
ERNESTO: ¿Qué cosa?
Joseph: “What’s that?”
ELIANA: ¿Cuándo, Ernesto, cúando?
ELIANA: “When, Ernesto, when?”
ERNESTO: ¿Cuándo qué?
Joseph: “When what?”
ELIANA: ¿Cuándo nos formalizamos?
ELIANA: “When are we going to make it formal?”
ERNESTO: Por tí, amor, hago cualquier cosa.
Joseph: “For you, baby, I’ll do anything!”
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Joseph: For you, baby, I’ll do anything!
Beatriz: Oh my God!
Joseph: Can you believe that? Ernesto, you’re so whipped. Oh my God! Okay! So, this conversation would be understood wherever Spanish is spoken. It might not be the hippest way to have this conversation, nor the most expressive for that matter, but you got to admit, it’s universal.
DIALOGUE - PERUVIAN
Beatriz: Ahora a la conversación peruana. Here is what the conversation might sound like in Lima:
CRISTINA: Eduardo, mi amor, mi familia está todo el tiempo preguntando cuándo...
EDUARDO: Ah, ¿qué? ¿Cuándo matamos el chancho?
CRISTINA: Algo así. Quieren saber cuando nos vamos a casar.
EDUARDO: ¡Primero nos hacen el corralito, y ahora quieren que nos casemos!
CRISTINA: Ay, amorcito. No seas tan malo con ellos. Yo también lo estaba pensando...
EDUARDO: Poco a poco se anda lejos, mi vida. ¿Por qué no lo pensamos tranquilos?
Joseph: And now slower! Una vez más, esta vez lentamente.
CRISTINA: Eduardo, mi amor, mi familia está todo el tiempo preguntando cuándo...
EDUARDO: Ah, ¿qué? ¿Cuándo matamos el chancho?
CRISTINA: Algo así. Quieren saber cuando nos vamos a casar.
EDUARDO: ¡Primero nos hacen el corralito, y ahora quieren que nos casemos!
CRISTINA: Ay, amorcito. No seas tan malo con ellos. Yo también lo estaba pensando...
EDUARDO: Poco a poco se anda lejos, mi vida. ¿Por qué no lo pensamos tranquilos?
Joseph: And now with the translation! Ahora incluiremos la traducción.
CRISTINA: Eduardo, mi amor, mi familia está todo el tiempo preguntando cuándo… “Eduardo, my love, my family is always asking when.”
EDUARDO: Ah, ¿qué? ¿Cuándo matamos el chancho? “What? When are we going to kill the pig?”
CRISTINA: Algo así. Quieren saber cuando nos vamos a casar. “Something like that. They want to know when we are going to get married.”
EDUARDO: ¡Primero nos hacen el corralito, y ahora quieren que nos casemos! “First, they corral us in and now they want us to get married!”
CRISTINA: Ay, amorcito. No seas tan malo con ellos. Yo también lo estaba pensando… “Oh, baby, don’t be so bad with them. I was also thinking about it.”
EDUARDO: Poco a poco se anda lejos, mi vida. ¿Por qué no lo pensamos tranquilos? “Little by little, one goes far, honey. Why don’t we relax and think about it?”
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Jospeh: ¿Bueno así son la presiones de las familias, no?That’s how the pressures are the family when you’re together with a partner for a while, right?
Beatriz: It’s something that belongs to be at the family. If you want to be in the family, you visit your girlfriend every weekend or every Sunday, for the Sunday meal.
Joseph: That’s right, that’s right! There’s no way out.
Beatriz: No.
Joseph: Alright! Well, let’s get into today’s lesson. So, in Newbie Lesson 31, all of Eliana’s family is asking the same question and that question is:
ELIANA: ¿Cuándo nos formalizamos?
Joseph: And whipped Ernesto says without hesitation:
ERNESTO: Por tí, amor, hago cualquier cosa.
Beatriz: Como que no se quiere molestar por nada y acepta, sigue la corriente. Sí mi amor…
Joseph: Oh, that’s interesting. I haven’t thought about that. So, you think that he’s just saying “I’ll do whatever.” so that she quits bugging him, huh?
Beatriz: Creo que en parte es eso pero también es la otra cosa que acepta ¿pues no?
Joseph: So, you’re saying that there’s a kind of a pragmatic attitude there, but he also does accept it. Well, let’s compare this. Now, in today’s Peruvian conversation this sounds quite a bit different. Cristina explains that her family “Quieren saber cuando nos vamos a casar.” and Eduardo responds “Primero nos hacen el corralito, y ahora quieren que nos casemos!”
Beatriz: How typical!
Joseph: Right? So, let’s hold off on the first sentence for a bit so that we can focus on the second.
Beatriz: Está bien. “Quieren que nos casemos.”
Joseph: “Quieren que nos casemos.” This is the sentence that we’re focusing on here and all this means is “They want us to get married.” But let’s see just how this is constructed.
Beatriz: Let’s start with the verbs.
Joseph: Sounds great. What are the verbs here?
Beatriz: They are “querer” and “casarse”.
Joseph: Okay! How about once again, a little slower so that we can really, really hear them.
Beatriz: Alright! “querer” and “casarse”.
Joseph: Okay, perfect! So, by now, most of you probably know that “querer” means “to want”. “Quiero, quieres, quiere”, “I want”, “you want”, “he wants”.
Beatriz: And “queremos, queréis, quieren” “we want”, “you all want”, “they want”.
Joseph: Right! And it’s its last form, the third person, plural, that we see in our example. “Quieren que nos casemos.”
Beatriz: Y ahora el segundo verbo, “casemos”.
Joseph: Now, this verb is in what we call the subordinated clause. Guys, don’t get scared by this! All this means is that the action of the verb “casemos” is depending on the action of the verb “quieren”, which is in the main clause. This happens all the time in Spanish, it’s really important to get used to.
Beatriz: Okay! Van a ver esta construcción vez tras vez.
Joseph: Exactly! So, the word “que” which means “that” is what tells that the following clause is subordinated. “Quieren que” “They want that”
Beatriz: Y de ahí tenemos el pronombre reflexivo “nos”, “quieren que nos casemos”.
Joseph: And we use this reflexive pronoun “nos” because the verb “casarse” is reflexive. We say “Me caso, te casas, se casa” “I get married”, “you get married” and “he gets married”.
Beatriz: And in the plural “nos casamos, vos casáis y se casan”.
Joseph: “We get married”, “you all get married” and “they get married”. But, Bea, in our example, “quieren que nos casemos” we’re not using the form “nos casamos”, we’re saying “nos casemos”. Why is that?
Beatriz: Porque tenemos que usar el modo subjuntivo en la clausula subordinada.
Joseph: Exactly! We have to use the Subjunctive Mood in the subordinated clause here, but we’ll still be using the Present Tense. Now, how do the forms of the Present Subjunctive differ from the Present Indicative?
Beatriz: Well, for an –ar verb like “casar” all you have to do enhance the vowel of the personal ending from A to E; from “nos casamos” we get “nos casemos”.
Joseph: Right, right! So, we would say “que yo me case, que tú te cases, que él se case, que nosotros nos casemos” just like in our example today, and then “que vosotros os caséis” and “que ellos se casen”.
Beatriz: Mucha gramatica.
Joseph: Yeh, you’re right! But, this is why we publish the PDF lesson guide with every lesson. Guys, check out the grammar explanation for more on today’s topic.
Beatriz: And if you really want to learn more, check out the Grammar Bank of the Learning Center.
Joseph: But, for now, stick around for some localisms.
Beatriz: Ahora estudiemos algunos localismos.
Joseph: That’s right! Time to study some localisms. So, today we have two phrases that could be called quadrant quote Peruvian. And another which would probably be understood elsewhere in the Spanish speaking world.
Beatriz: Aja, primero la frase...
Joseph: “¿Cuándo matamos el chancho?” Now, Bea, literally this means “When are we going to kill the pig?” and when we were developing today’s lesson conversation, I kind of stopped when you suggested this one, but you said that it has some kind of an insinuation here, right?
Beatriz: Bueno lo que pasa es que si vas a matar un chancho lo que significa es que va a ver un gran tono, una gran fiesta.
Joseph: Okay, okay!
Beatriz: Entonces hay un gran acontecimiento, pues no y como que ahí mandas la indirecta por el costadito.
Joseph: Right, right! So, “matar al chancho” “to kill a pig” kind of implies that you’re going to have this big party. So, when Eduardo says “que vamos a matar al chancho” he’s kind of suspecting that she’s going to be talking about marriage, because it implies that there’s going to be this huge party.
Beatriz: Yes! Muy bien. Seguimos a la oróxima frase.
Joseph: And what is the next one?
Beatriz: Hacer el corralito.
Joseph: Another great one! Now, Bea, literally this means “to make the little pen” or “to make the little coral”, but in Peruvian culture, what exactly does this mean?
Beatriz: Pues que te estás acorralando. “Corral” significa, es como un patio trasero de las casas antiguas.
Joseph: Okay! So, “corral” is a little patio, a little courtyard, it’s a fenced thin area behind houses and these are probably more traditional like older houses or…
Beatriz: Yes, and in the coral they had like the hens and the chickens and…
Joseph: Right! So, it’s kind of a pen.
Beatriz: Encerradas, acorraladas.
Joseph: Right! They’re fenced in.
Beatriz: Con rejas, así entonces este es como una metáfora “hacer acorralar” “hacer el corralito”, to get together two persons.
Joseph: Right, right, right! So, the idea of this is that your family wants you to get with someone else. So, what they do is they corral you, they kind of pen you in so that there’s no way out. So that you’re kind of in that pen with the other person and, you know, you’re, you got to live with them there.
Beatriz: You got it!
Joseph: Alright! And, finally, we wanted to mention the last line of the Peruvian conversation, where Eduardo says “poco a poco se anda lejos”. This is, it’s almost like a proverb.
Beatriz: It reminds me a lot when I was a little child. Me hace recordar cuando era niña y mi madre me decía “Poco a poco se hace lejos, nadie nace sabiendo.”
Joseph: That’s a really great little corollary to that. So, literally this means “Little by little, one goes far.”, right? And, Beatrice, as you just explained, your mother when you were little used to say that saying and then add another little saying to it that no one is born knowing, right? So…
Beatriz: Yes.
Joseph: It’s a really great.
Beatriz: Yes, it’s great. When you’re a little child, you want to learn so many things and you’re like “Oh, mum, I can’t do that.”
Joseph: Right! That’s really cool!
Beatriz: Okay! Bueno chicosm ya no nos queda mucho tiempo.

Outro

Joseph: That’s going to wrap it up for today. Now, from here, be sure to check out the PDF to study what we’ve covered and then stop by Spanishpod101.com and review and reinforce in the Learning Center.
Beatriz: After that, leave a comment. Post a question in the forum.
Joseph: Make this an active learning process and you’ll find yourself speaking Spanish in no time. And remember that this lesson references Newbie Lesson 31 and the 31st lesson of the Iberian and Costa Rican Series. So make the cross reference to see what all the talk is about.
Beatriz: Okay guys!
Joseph: ¡Qué les vaya bien!

Grammar

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Dialogue - Peruvian

Dialogue - Standard

3 Comments

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SpanishPod101.com
Friday at 6:30 pm
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Thanks to Kevin Macleod for the music in today's lesson. Check out the Learning Center and the Grammar Bank to reinforce what we've covered today! The Subjunctive Mood is tricky, so practice with our tools to improve your Spanish, it's worth the effort!

SpanishPod101.comVerified
Tuesday at 2:20 pm
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Hi Yvonne,


don't worry if you cannot follow this 100%. This lessons are special ones that belong to the "Spanish Language Specific" and not to a specific level. Although we translate the phrases mentioned, if some things still don't make sense, maybe you need some practice with the normal lessons and some time, so you will be able to get everything!


So no need for a sad face:wink:


If you have any questions, please let us know! We are here to help!


Stefania/SpanishPod101.com

yvonne
Tuesday at 3:16 pm
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the 2 charactors in the conversation are pressurize for the marriage but i'm pressurize to understand the conversation in spanish!:cry: