Dialogue

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Beatriz: Buen día, soy Bea.
Joseph: What’s up? I’m Joseph. Peruvian Spanish Series, Lesson 25 – “The languages of Huayna Picchu”
Beatriz: Hola amigos ¿Cómo están todos?
Joseph: How is everyone doing? Beatrice and Joseph back again.
Beatriz: Están escuchando la vigésimo quinta lección del ciclo peruano.
Joseph: You’re listening to the 25th lesson of the Peruvian Spanish Series.
Beatriz: Transmitiendo de SpanishPod101.com.
Joseph: Today’s lesson picks up where we left off last time, in one of the most remarkable, archaeological sites in the world, in a natural landscape that will take even the most experienced travelers breath away.
Beatriz: So, last time we were getting ready to go through a tour of Machu Picchu.
Joseph: Right! It’s strange to think that only now, in Lesson 25, are we talking about one of the most important places in Peru?
Beatriz: Yes, but I think it’s better to do this way instead of explaining it and turning it into some kind of Disneyland.
Joseph: Yes, I agree! I mean the tourism in that area especially in Aguascalientes sometimes it can make it hard to enjoy the magical element of Machu Picchu and Huayna Picchu.
Beatriz: Yes, yes, that’s right! So, what’s up for today’s grammar?
Joseph: We’re going to look at how an informal request can be soften to the point that it’s almost as courteous as a formal request.
Beatriz: Suena muy util.
Joseph: Yes.
Beatriz: And remember, this lesson references Newbie Lesson 25, so make the cross reference.
Joseph: And make it for the 25th lesson of the Iberian and Costa Rican Series, as well.
Beatriz: En la conversación de hoy María le pregunta a Henry si desea pasear por el Huayna Picchu.
Joseph: And Huayna Picchu is that peak that rises up over Machu Picchu and you can go up on top of it and get a whole different view of your surroundings.
Beatriz: Well, for now, let’s hear today’s conversation.
DIALOGUE - NORMAL
Joseph: so, back in Newbie Lesson 25, we recall that we heard the following conversation:
YMA: Ahora, continuamos con el altar.
MARISSA: ¿Puede usted hablar más despacio, por favor?
YMA: ¡Claro! ¿Hablo muy rapido para ustedes?
LUKE: Sí. Queremos escuchar cada cosa. ¡Es muy interesante!
Joseph: This time with the translation! Ahora incluiremos la traducción.
YMA: Ahora, continuamos con el altar.
YMA: “Now we continue with the altar.”
MARISSA: ¿Puede usted hablar más despacio, por favor?
MARISSA: “Madam, can you speak slower, please?”
YMA: ¡Claro! ¿Hablo muy rapido para ustedes?
YMA: “Of course! Do I speak very fast for you all?”
LUKE: Sí. Queremos escuchar cada cosa. ¡Es muy interesante!
LUKE: “Yes, we want to listen to everything. It’s very interesting!”
DIALOGUE - PERUVIAN
Joseph: That conversation could be called standard or universal. I mean, there aren’t a lot of localisms or vocabulary proper to one region. It would be understood just about anywhere. But now, we’re going to turn our attention to a conversation that takes place in Huayna Picchu, the Eastern side of the Andes, in Peru. This is what we hear:
MARÍA: Ahora, pues, ¿quisieras dar un paseo por el Huayna Picchu?
HENRY: Ay, perdón, señorita, pero ¿podrías hablar más despacito?
MARÍA: Disculpa. ¿Acaso estoy hablando demasiado rápido?
HENRY: ¡Como un papagayo! Es que no quiero perder nada.
MARÍA: No hay problema.... ¡Vamos! Gehen wir!
Joseph: Once again, slowly! Una vez más, esta vez despacio.
MARÍA: Ahora, pues, ¿quisieras dar un paseo por el Huayna Picchu?
HENRY: Ay, perdón, señorita, pero ¿podrías hablar más despacito?
MARÍA: Disculpa. ¿Acaso estoy hablando demasiado rápido?
HENRY: ¡Como un papagayo! Es que no quiero perder nada.
MARÍA: No hay problema.... ¡Vamos! Gehen wir!
Joseph: This time with the translation! Ahora incluiremos la traducción.
MARÍA: Ahora, pues, ¿quisieras dar un paseo por el Huayna Pichu? “So now, would you like to go up to the Huayna Picchu?”
HENRY: Ay, perdón, señorita, pero ¿podrías hablar más despacito? “Oh, I’m sorry Maria, could you speak a touch slower?”
MARÍA: Disculpa. ¿Acaso estoy hablando demasiado rápido? “I’m sorry! Am I speaking too fast?”
HENRY: ¡Como un papagayo! Es que no quiero perder nada. “Like a parrot. The thing is that I don’t want to miss anything.”
MARÍA: No hay problema.... ¡Vamos! Gehen wir! “No problem! Let’s go! Gehen wir!”
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Joseph: So, here we learn how to ask someone if they can speak a little bit slower and this is such an important facet in learning Spanish, don’t you think?
Beatriz: Yes!
Joseph: So, now let’s begin with some comparisons here.
Beatriz: ¿Por dónde quisieras empezar?
Joseph: Let’s begin with the most important question of the conversation, maybe one of the most important questions that anyone just starting out in Spanish can learn.
Beatriz: Okay! So, in Newbie Lesson 25, Marissa asks Ima, the tour guide:
MARISSA: ¿Puede usted hablar más despacio, por favor?
MARISSA: “Madam, can you speak slower, please?”
Joseph: And in today’s Peruvian Lesson, Henry asks Maria Ay, perdón, señorita, pero ¿podrías hablar más depsacito?
Beatriz: Similar, yet different two.
Joseph: Right! Two main differences.
Beatriz: La primera es la conjugación del verbo auxiliar “podrías”.
Joseph: In the Newbie Lesson it’s “puede” as in “puede usted”, the third person, singular, of the Present. But in the Peruvian Lesson we have “podrías”.
Beatriz: Now, in the second person, singular, of the Conditional Tense “podrías tú”.
Joseph: And what’s interesting about this is that even though we’re switching from the formal address “usted” to the informal “tú”, we’re still maintaining a sense of courtesy by using the Conditional Tense.
Beatriz: And there is another difference, too.
Joseph: Which is?
Beatriz: In the Newbie Lesson, they say “despacio”, but here we said “despacito”.
Joseph: And how would you characterize this difference?
Beatriz: Es el diminutivo.
Joseph: El diminutivo. And why would you use the diminutive “más despacito” here instead of just “más despacio” in order to say “slower”?
Beatriz: Well, if we say “despacito” our request does not sound too frank.
Joseph: So, it’s like instead of saying “slower” now we’re saying “a bit slower” or “a touch slower”. It kind of softens the request.
Beatriz: Exactamente.
Joseph: So, a quick recap.
Beatriz: In Newbie Lesson 25, we heard:
MARISSA: ¿Puede usted hablar más despacio, por favor?
MARISSA: “Madam, can you speak slower, please?”
Joseph: And in today’s Peruvian Lesson we said ¿podrías hablar más despacito?
Beatriz: Now, let’s look at another question here.
Joseph: Okay, go ahead.
Beatriz: In the Newbie Lesson conversation, Ima asks:
YMA: ¿Hablo muy rapido para ustedes?
YMA: “Do I speak very fast for you all?”
Joseph: And we can compare that to the Peruvian version where Maria asks ¿Acaso estoy hablando demasiado rápido?
Beatriz: Again, very similar, but different.
Joseph: Here, let’s point out two differences. Bea, what’s the verb in the Newbie Lesson?
Beatriz: Hablo
Joseph: And what tense is it in?
Beatriz: The Present Tense.
Joseph: And what’s the Infinitive form of “hablo”?
Beatriz: It’s “hablar”.
Joseph: And in the Peruvian version in which word do we see a form of “hablar”?
Beatriz: We see it in “hablando”.
Joseph: And what kind of word is that?
Beatriz: Un gerundio.
Joseph: And is there a verb in the Present Tense in the Peruvian version?
Beatriz: Sí, es el verbo “estoy”.
Joseph: So, we say “estoy hablando” using the Present Tense and the Gerund instead of using the Absolute Present “hablo”. Now, what about the word “acaso”?
Beatriz: Es una palabra que tiene unas cuantas excepciones.
Joseph: ¿Cómo por ejemplo?
Beatriz: Well, for example, we can say: Acaso no vaya a trabajar mañana.
Joseph: Okay! So, in that case it’s like saying “Maybe I won’t go to work tomorrow.” So, the word “acaso” can mean “maybe” or “perhaps” in this sentence.
Beatriz: And in our conversation the word “acaso” emphasizes the possibility of a speaking fast.
Joseph: So, when I ask “¿Acaso estoy hablando muy rápido?”, the possibility that I’m really speaking too fast is stressed. Well, if I simply ask “¿Estoy hablando rapido?” it’s a pretty straightforward question.
Beatriz: La primera indica la incredulidad.
Joseph: Disbelief or “lo incredulo” what’s incredulous.
Beatriz: So, again, to recap. In Newbie Lesson 25 we heard:
YMA: ¿Hablo muy rapido para ustedes?
YMA: “Do I speak very fast for you all?”
Joseph: And in today’s Peruvian conversation we said ¿Acaso estoy hablando demasiado rápido?
Beatriz: Ahora probemos el verdadero sabor del lenguaje peruano.
Joseph: Localisms.
Beatriz: Hoy estamos en Huayna Picchu.
Joseph: And Huayna Picchu is a small mountain set just behind Machu Picchu. So, Maria the guide has offered to lead Henry up to the top. Bea, have you ever been to the top of Huayna Picchu?
Beatriz: Not yet, but I hear it’s pretty good. You have an amazing view of this high mountain. I think it’s a nice trick. And, Joseph, have you been up Huayna Picchu?
Joseph: I have, actually. I went with my uncle and my cousin years ago, I was 19 I think. It was a really, really interesting trip. There are actually steps up amongst the whole mountain, which makes it sound a lot easier than it actually yes. It’s pretty steep and the air is so thin, you know that you run out of breath very easily, but to well worth it, if you go to Machu Picchu, definitely take a couple of hours, go up Huayna Picchu and get a totally different view of everything.
Beatriz: Yes, definitely! When you were learning Spanish and you ask someone to speak slower, what do you find?
Joseph: Well, it depends on where I was. For example, I spent some time in Chile, in “Concepción”, when I was really just learning Spanish, and I found that it didn’t do a lot of good there. I have a lot of love for Chile, but I have to say it’s a really tough place to learn Spanish. When I was in Peru, and this happened, it was a different story. I think that Peruvians are much more willing to speak Spanish with foreigners, even if the foreigners are making mistakes, you know, the Peruvians are willing to try to understand them and correct them. That was the biggest thing for me.
Beatriz: Yes, I think it’s not that fun for all the people to have a foreigner, you know, to help them to speak.
Joseph: That’s just the attitude that I’m talking about and as a foreigner, it makes it so much easier to learn and it really gives you a lot of confidence because you’re not embarrassed, you know, you’re not afraid to make mistakes. Now, another interesting word that came up is “papagayo”.
Beatriz: When Maria asks Henry is she speaking too fast, Henry says “Yes, ¡Como un papagayo!.”
Joseph: And literally, Bea, what is “papagayo”?
Beatriz: It’s a big parrot.
Joseph: Okay! And figuratively, when we call someone “papagayo” we mean that they’re a chatter box. Bea, in Peru, where can you a see a real “papagayo”?
Beatriz: You want to see not domesticated “papagayo” you have to go to the jungle.
Joseph: To the jungle en la amazonia?
Beatriz: Yes! Entonces llegamos hasta acá amigos.
Joseph: Ya fue.
OUTRO
Beatriz: That’s all for today!
Joseph: Remember that these lessons are designed to be used in tandem with the language tools in the Learning Center at Spanishpod101.com. Post us your questions, comments, critics and make the cross reference with Newbie Lesson 25 and the 25th lesson of the Iberian and Costa Rican Series.
Beatriz: Okay! Esto es todo por hoy amigos.
Joseph: Thanks for joining us.

Grammar

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Dialogue - Peruvian

Dialogue - Standard

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SpanishPod101.com
Saturday at 6:30 pm
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Thanks to Kevin Macleod for the music in today's lesson. Have any Spod101 users ever been to Machu Picchu and Huayna Picchu? If you aren't in good condition, or if you have a fear of heights, I don't recommend making the steep trek up Huayana Picchu. It is amazing, however, if you do make it to the top. It is like standing in the clouds as you look down on the ruins and the temple of the sun.

SpanishPod101.com
Monday at 7:36 am
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Hola Abby,


Thank you for your comment.

Let's review the following examples of present subjunctive.

Es bueno que hayas venido.

No se vayan sin mi.

Espero que el coma toda su comida.


Sigamos practicando.


Saludos,

Carla

Team SpanishPod101.com

Abby
Monday at 11:14 pm
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gracias por tu respuesta. Serías tan amable de darme un ejemplo usando el presente del subjuntivo?

SpanishPod101.com
Sunday at 12:13 pm
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Hola Abby,


Thank you for your comments.

Yes, you can also use the imperfect subjunctive.

"Le dije que no abriera la puerta, por si acaso fuera alguien que no conocía."

Sigamos practicando.


Saludos,

Carla

Team SpanishPod101.com

Abby
Monday at 8:04 am
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learning about acaso as a conjunction with the present subjunctive......all of the examples given use the imperfect subjunctive. In the last example could you say...... por si acaso sea alguien importante, or do you always use the imperfect subjunctive?.

steven
Sunday at 3:58 am
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First line of the dialog:


MARÍA: Ahora, pues, ¿quisieras dar un paseo por el Huayna Pichu?


When you listen to the audio, she actually says something like

Ahora, pues, ¿quisieras subir al Huayna Pichu?

Carlos
Sunday at 8:00 am
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If you want to go see ruins closer to Lima, check out Pachacamac which is an archaeological site 40 km southeast of Lima in the Valley of the Lurín River. It wouldn't hold the majesty of Huayana Picchu but it is amazing all on its own.