Dialogue

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Beatriz: Buen día, soy Bea.
Joseph: Soy Joseph. Peruvian Spanish Series, Lesson 22 – “Let’s beat it!”
Beatriz: Muy bienvenidos.
Joseph: How is it going? I’m Joseph and I’m joined here by our insider source for Peruvian language and customs, Beatrice! ¿Qué hay de nuevo?
Beatriz: Hola amigos en todo el mundo. Hola Jo, todo bien, aquí calentando los motores. Y ya nos toca otra lección del ciclo de habla peruana.
Joseph: Así es. Today we have another lesson from the Peruvian Spanish Series coming to you on demand from Spanishpod101.com, this time la lección veintidos, 22!
Beatriz: Sí, que bestia, como vuela el tiempo.
Joseph: Entonces amiga mia. ¿Qué es lo que vimos la vez pasada? What did we look at last time?
Beatriz: Hablamos de la paciencia y la impaciencia.
Joseph: La paciencia y la impaciencia. That’s right, patience and impatience. Notice that they’re “cognados”, cognates. And you know, Bea, I was thinking about it. I’m wondering if we can say that in Peru there’s a common desire for “el ocioso” and “ocioso” means “leisure” in this sense. Bea, what do you think? ¿Qué opinas?
Beatriz: Creo que en el Perú es muy común y es una de las actividades más….
Joseph: No es una actividad, es una falta de actividad. It’s a lack of activity.
Beatriz: Perate perate, pues. Es un espacio abierto a la imaginación.
Joseph: Un espacio abierto a la imaginación. A space open to imagination. Interesting! Leisure, ocioso, imagination.
Beatriz: Sin ocioso no habría… no habría así como sentarse a reflexionar y pensar ¿que vamos a hacer? O no se, de ahí se desarrolla el arte, la cultura, las festejaciones sociales, que se yo… Y por eso es que el Perú y latinoamérica es tan colorida.
Joseph: Okay! Interesante, bueno… In today’s lesson we’re going to look at something similar. We’re going to hear a conversation between Lucia and Julio, again, but this time it’s Julio who’s waiting for Lucia.
Beatriz: That’s good! Because this way you can hear what a woman sounds like when she’s taking her time.
Joseph: True, true! And, Bea, what about today’s grammar topic? What did you want to look at?
Beatriz: Porque no estudiamos el tiempo pretérito absoluto. Como por ejemplo: “Te alistaste” y “te fijaste”.
Joseph: Me fije. Sounds like a great idea! We’ll look at the Absolute Preterit Tense, seeing that it comes up twice in today’s conversation.
Beatriz: So, as we get ready for this conversation, try to imagine yourself there.
Joseph: These are the kind of things that we all do, everywhere. This is a completely common situation. What we’re going to learn is how it sounds in two forms of Spanish. First, a form which would be understood throughout the Spanish speaking world, and the second which would be common to hear in Lima, Peru.
Beatriz: Back in Newbie Lesson 22 we heard Augusto and Cecilia have the following conversation:
DIALOGUE - NORMAL
AUGUSTO: ¡Oye, Cecilia! ¿Estás lista?
CECILIA: Sí. Ahora voy.
AUGUSTO: Tengo muchas ganas de salir esta noche.
CECILIA: Ya estoy listo. ¡Vamos!
Joseph: This time with the translation! Ahora incluiremos la traducción.
AUGUSTO: ¡Oye, Cecilia! ¿Estás lista?
AUGUSTO: “Hey, Cecilia, are you ready?”
CECILIA: Sí. Ahora voy.
CECILIA: “Yes, and be there right away!”
AUGUSTO: Tengo muchas ganas de salir esta noche.
AUGUSTO: “I really feel like going out tonight.”
CECILIA: Ya estoy listo. ¡Vamos!
CECILIA: “Now I’m ready. Let’s go!”
DIALOGUE - PERUVIAN
Joseph: So, this conversation would be understood wherever Spanish is spoken. It might not be the hippest way to have this conversation or the most expressive for that matter, but it’s universal.
Beatriz: Ahora, a la conversación peruana. Here is what that conversation might sound like in Lima, Peru.
JULIO: ¡Dime, Lucía, ya te alistaste?
LUCÍA: Sí, bajo ahorita.
JULIO: Estoy emocionadísimo por la llegada de tu hermano.
LUCÍA: ¿Ya te fijaste a qué hora aterriza?
JULIO: Claro, por supuesto pues. Está a tiempo.
LUCÍA: Entonces, ¡arranquémonos!
Joseph: Once again, slowly! Una vez más, esta vez lentamente.
JULIO: ¡Dime, Lucía, ya te alistaste?
LUCÍA: Sí, bajo ahorita.
JULIO: Estoy emocionadísimo por la llegada de tu hermano.
LUCÍA: ¿Ya te fijaste a qué hora aterriza?
JULIO: Claro, por supuesto pues. Está a tiempo.
LUCÍA: Entonces, ¡arranquémonos!
Joseph: This time with the translation! Ahora incluiremos la traducción.
Joseph: ¡Dime, Lucía, ya te alistaste? “Tell me, Lucia, did you get ready yet?”
Beatriz: Sí, bajo ahorita. “Yes, I’ll be down in a second.”
Joseph: Estoy emocionadísimo por la llegada de tu hermano. “I’m so excited for your brother’s arrival.”
Beatriz: ¿Ya te fijaste a qué hora aterriza? “Did you check what time he lands?”
Joseph: Claro, por supuesto pues. Está a tiempo. “Sure, of course I did, it’s on time!”
Beatriz: Entonces, ¡arranquémonos! “So, then, let’s beat it!”
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Joseph: Well, I’ll tell you, that’s a conversation I’ve had more than once. You know, Bea, that word “ahorita” is a really good one to practice. It’s got that –ao combination. Could you just say it a few times, nice and slowly?
Beatriz: Alright! Ahorita, ahorita.
Joseph: And now, a couple of times fast.
Beatriz: Ahorita, ahorita, ahorita. Parezco una lorita.
Joseph: Alright! That is great to hear! It’s so important to learn how these words are actually pronounced and you’ll remember that that H is silent, so we say “ahorita”. All right! In today’s Peruvian conversation we hear a somewhat different scenario, but for the most part we’ve got two people who are getting ready to leave. One with a slightly greater sense of urgency that the other, but they’re both trying to get out of there.
Beatriz: Let’s compare the two!
Joseph: Alright! How about right in the first line?
Beatriz: Claro. In Newbie Lesson 22, Augusto says:
AUGUSTO: ¡Oye, Cecilia! ¿Estás lista?
AUGUSTO: “Hey, Cecilia, are you ready?”
Beatriz: And in today’s Peruvian conversation, Julio says: ¡Dime, Lucía, ya te alistaste? “Tell me, Lucia, did you get ready yet?”
Joseph: So, we hear:
AUGUSTO: ¡Oye, Cecilia!
Joseph: In the Newbie Lesson and Dime, Lucía, in the Peruvian Lesson.
AUGUSTO: ¡Oye, Cecilia!
Joseph: Dime, Lucía,
Beatriz: Yes, that’s it!
Joseph: Does “oye” mean “Hey”?
Beatriz: We’ve seen that before.
Joseph: Have we seen it before or have we heard it before?
Beatriz: We heard that before.
Joseph: Okay! Que tal actitud, picona… Okay! Then what about “dime”? Doesn’t this mean “say to me”?
Beatriz: It’s more like “tell me”.
Joseph: “Tell me”, okay! And this comes from the verb “decir”, right?
Beatriz: Right!
Joseph: Okay! So, “decir”means “to say” or “to tell” and when we say “dime” like this, is it only being used to solicit a response from someone or is it used for some other end as well?
Beatriz: It’s also used to get someone’s attention, especially when you are asking them a question.
Joseph: So, it can kind of be like a prelude, “un preludio”, to a question so you can say “Dime Bea, te tengo que preguntar algo.” “Tell me Bea, I’ve got to ask you something.” And then you ask the question, right?
Beatriz: Yes, that’s right!
Joseph: Okay! So, a quick recap.
Beatriz: In Newbie Lesson 22:
AUGUSTO: ¡Oye, Cecilia! ¿Estás lista?
AUGUSTO: “Hey, Cecilia, are you ready?”
Joseph: And in our Peruvian conversation we said “¡Dime, Lucía, ya te alistaste?” “Tell me, Lucia, did you get ready yet?”
Beatriz: Okay, next! Let’s compare the second line of each.
Joseph: Go on with it. In Newbie Lesson 22, Cecilia says:
CECILIA: Sí. Ahora voy.
CECILIA: “Yes, and be there right away.”
Beatriz: Okay! And now, in our Peruvian version, Lucia says: Sí, bajo ahorita. “Yes, I’ll be down in a second.”
Joseph: Great comparison! “Ahora” versus “ahorita”. This is one of those cases where the diminutive doesn’t show endearment, but rather changes the meaning of the word. This is a word that you have to learn, it’s essential.
Beatriz: CLaro, cuando decimos “ahorita” muchas veces nos referimos a un momento cercano pero futuro, es decir dentro de poco.
Joseph: Okay! So, there’s a key phrase in what you just said, Bea! “Cercano pero futuro”.
Beatriz: Cercano pero futuro.
Joseph: So, “dentro de poco”.
Beatriz: O “dentro de poquitito”.
Joseph: In this sense, we’re talking about a moment in the near future and if you look up “ahorita” in the dictionary you’ll probably find the meaning “now”, but you have to understand that this “now” stretches out into the past and into the future also. When you’re saying “bajo ahorita”, especially in the diminutive here, you’re really talking about “dentro de poco. OSea, en el futuro, en un futuro cercano”. We can translate that as “soon”, “in a second”, “shortly” and we should also point that when you say “bajo ahorita” you’re also using the Present Tense of the Indicative Mood with a future value, right? You’re saying “I will be right down.” even though it’s conjugated in the Present Tense.
Beatriz: Alright! And that is how we say “bajo” in order to say “I’ll be down.” or “I’m coming down.”
Joseph: Very good point! So, if you’re upstairs “tienes que bajar”, you have to go down and if you’re downstairs and you need to go up “tienes que…?”
Beatriz: Subir.
Joseph: Subir, right! So, once again, in Newbie Lesson 22, Cecilia says:
CECILIA: Sí. Ahora voy.
CECILIA: “Yes, and be there right away!”
Beatriz: And in our Peruvian version, Lucia says: Sí, bajo ahorita. “Yes, I’ll be down in a second.”
Joseph: Man, I remember when I was learning Spanish, the words “ahora” and “ahorita” just confused me to no end.
Beatriz: Yes, I imagine that, because you use this all the time!
Joseph: Right! And it’s so hard to distinguish which time it’s referring to because it means “now” but also “right away” and also “just a second ago”. For example, if you ask me “¿Sabes dónde está MArtin?”“Do you know where Martin is?” and I could say “Sí ahorita lo vi.” “Yes, I saw him just a second ago.” or “I just saw him.”
Beatriz: Yes, this it’s a little bit crazy that, I mean, once you are there in the culture like speaking and learning, hearing and talking, you get it.
Joseph: Right! The context is everything. That’s a great point.
Beatriz: Okay! Aquí papito, entonces papito nos vamos a la próxima parte de la lección.
Joseph: Now, let’s look at a couple of phrases that would be sure to find in Peru.
Beatriz: Muy bien. Porque no empezamos con la frase “¿Te fijaste?”
Joseph: From the verb “fijarse”. And, Bea, if I ask you “¿Te fijaste en el color de sus ojos?” what do I mean?
Beatriz: You’re asking “Did you check out the color of his eyes?”
Joseph: And this form, “te fijast” is in which tense?
Beatriz: El tiempo pretérito absoluto.
Joseph: The Absolute Preterit.
Beatriz: Let’s have a quick look at the endings.
Joseph: Great! So, how about the singular?
Beatriz: “Yo me fije”, “tú te fijaste” y “él se fijó”.
Joseph: Okay! So, “Yo me fije”, “tú te fijaste” y “él se fijó”. And in the plural?
Beatriz: Nosotros no fijamos, vosotros os fijasteis, ellos se fijaron.
Joseph: Okay! Nosotros no fijamos, vosotros os fijasteis, ellos se fijaron. So, if you use it as we did in this last example, “¿Te fijaste en el color de sus ojos?” right? We’re saying “Did you check out the color of his eyes?” like “Did you notice the color of his eyes?” “Te diste cuenta del color de sus ojos”, right?
Beatriz: That’s a very common use of this verb.
Joseph: Bea, if we’re talking in a conversation and I say “¿Te fijas?”, ”how would you translate that?
Beatriz: “Do you understand?”, but I have to say that we don’t use it too much. I think it could be used much more in Mexico.
Joseph: It wouldn’t sound completely foreign to hear it in Peru, but it’s not as common as something like “te diste cuenta. Darse cuenta” is “to realize” or “to notice”, right?
Beatriz: Yes, yes of course!
Joseph: Alright! And now let’s move on and talk about one more word, the title of this lesson, in translation of course, arranquémonos.
Beatriz: DEl verbo “arrancarse”.
Joseph: And what, may I ask, does this one mean, señorita Beatrice?
Beatriz: Bueno, significa prender el auto.
Joseph: Prender el auto. So, it means “to start a car” and that’s one if its meanings, right?
Beatriz: There’s another meaning, it’s like “es sacar una cosa que está metida o insertada en otro.
Joseph: It’s to remove something that’s inside something else.
Beatriz: Jalando con fuerza hasta que salga la raíz.
Joseph: Pulling it until the root breaks. So, it’s kind of like “erradicar” “to eradicate”, “to uproot”, right?
Beatriz: Yes!
Joseph: How about an example?
Beatriz: ¡Ya estamos listos para ir a la playa, arranquémonos!
Joseph: “Now we’re ready to go to the beach. Let’s beat it!”, “Let’s start the car!” You know, it’s hard to translate because it’s such a figurative use.
Beatriz: Yes! Es una forma muy graciosa y bienhumorada de expresar el deseo de salir.
Joseph: Okay! Arranquémonos, arranquémonos. And another thing that we should point out is that this is the first person, singular, of the form in the Present Subjunctive, right? So, that’s why we translated it as “Let’s go!” or “Let’s beat it!”, it’s “let us”. Would you expect to hear this in say second person, singular, like could say “arrancate”, to say “get out of here”?
Beatriz: Se usa pero muy poco, es un poco más broma cuando le quieres decir a la otra persona que se apure.
Joseph: It would be more of a joke if you were to use it this way in the second person, singular, and order someone to leave because of the multiple meanings that are implied, right? We have different levels of meaning, when we say “arranquémonos” it’s like making a joke, but on ourselves, right?
Beatriz: Yes!
OUTRO
Joseph: On that note, this is where we’ll stop for today and right where it starts for you.
Beatriz: Y no dejes de bajar el PDF.
Joseph: Check out the PDF and also the Learning Center. And if you don’t already have a premium membership, try it out for a week on us.
Beatriz: Okay amigos, hasta aca llegamos. Nos vemos y hasta la próxima.

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Dialogue - Peruvian

Dialogue - Standard

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Thanks to Kevin Macleod for the music in today's lesson! As we saw in today's lesson, there are a lot of different ways to say "let's go!". We found out about a bunch of expressions that can be used to express the desire to leave. Does anyone out there know of another expression similar to "¡vamos!" not listed in the Cultural Insight section?