Dialogue

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Beatriz: Buenos días, me llamo Beatriz.
Joseph: Joseph here! Peruvian Spanish Series, Lesson 2 – Chambeando duro. Hi there! My name is Joseph!
Beatriz: And I am Beatriz!
Joseph: Muy bienvenidos. Welcome to the second lesson of the Peruvian Spanish Series at Spanishpod101.com, where we cover pronunciation and intonation proper to the Spanish of Peru.
Beatriz: By comparing Peruvian speech to the standard Spanish taught in the core curriculum of the Spanishpod101. We give you the insight’s perspective on Peruvian Spanish.
Joseph: And we contextualize it for you by explaining Peruvian customs.
Beatriz: So, join us for this lesson of the Spanishpod101.com
Joseph: Last time, we looked at some different ways of greeting people in Peruvian Spanish. Today, we’re going to pick up where we left off and look at some more of those key questions and answers that are bound to come up.
Beatriz: Today’s lesson references Newbie Lesson 2 – “How are you all?” So, be sure to check it out on our website.
Joseph: Also, in this lesson, we’ll look at the plural forms of the verb “estar”, conjugated to the Present Tense of the Indicative Mood.
Beatriz: Check out the transcripts and translations in the PDF for this lesson at the Spanishpod101.com
Joseph: To start out, let’s go back to Newbie Lesson 2 where we heard the following conversation:
DIALOGUE - NORMAL
José: ¿Cómo están Claudia y tú?
Beatriz: Nosotras estamos bien
José: ¿Y cómo están Cristina y Javier?
Beatriz: Ellos también están bien.
José: ¡Qué bueno!
Joseph: This time, with the translation! ahora incluiremos la traducción.
José: ¿Cómo están Claudia y tú?
José: “How are you and Claudia?”
Beatriz: Nosotras estamos bien.
Beatriz: “We are well.”
José: ¿Y cómo están Cristina y Javier?
José: “And how are Cristina and Javier?”
Beatriz: Ellos también están bien.
Beatriz: “They are well, too.”
José: ¡Qué bueno!
José: “Great!”
DIALOGUE - PERUVIAN
Joseph: Now, let’s hear what that sounds like in Peruvian Spanish. ¿Cómo están Claudia y tú?
Beatriz: Estamos bien, felizmente.
Joseph: ¿Y qué es de la vida de Cristina y Javier?
Beatriz: Ellos están bien, chambeando duro
Joseph: ¡Chevere!
Joseph: ¿Cómo están Claudia y tú?
Beatriz: Estamos bien, felizmente.
Joseph: ¿Y qué es de la vida de Cristina y Javier?
Beatriz: Ellos están bien, chambeando duro
Joseph: ¡Chevere!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Joseph: So, it’s obvious that there are some serious differences between these two conversations. To begin, let’s look at the way “We are well.” was rendered in Peruvian Spanish. Beatrice, could you repeat that for us, please?
Beatriz: Estamos bien, felizmente.
Joseph: “We are well, fortunately.” Now, in Newbie Lesson 2, it simply sounded like this:
Beatriz: Nosotras estamos bien.
Joseph: Beatrice, where should we start out to show how these expressions differ from one to another?
Beatriz: Alright! Empecemos con el pronombre personal. Let’s begin with the personal pronoun. Joseph, what is the personal pronoun in the expression from Newbie Lesson 2?
Joseph: That would be “nosotros” “we”.
Beatriz: Yes! It’s very common in the Spanish, not only Peruvian Spanish, to omit the personal pronoun, because the ending of the verb tells us to whom we’re referring.
Joseph: That’s right! So, in this case, because the verb is “estamos” with that m-o-s ending, we know that it belongs to “nosotros”, the first person plural.
Beatriz: You got it!
Joseph: Cool! You know, Beatrice, there was another word in the Peruvian rendering which we didn’t hear in the version from Newbie Lesson 2.
Beatriz: Felizmente
Joseph: “Felizmente”, “fortunately”
Beatriz: Right! Very often, when we are well we say “felizmente” after “estoy bien” or “estamos bien” to show that we are grateful for being well.
Joseph: ME gusta esa costumbre. I like that custom. So, again, the standard way to say “We are well.” is:
Beatriz: Nosotras estamos bien.
Joseph: And in Peruvian Spanish we often say:
Beatriz: Estamos bien, felizmente.
Joseph: “We’re well, fortunately!” Great! All right! Next, we’ll look at the way the question “How are Cristina and Javier?” was formed in Peruvian Spanish. Beatrice, could you repeat that for us, please?
Beatriz: ¿Y qué es de la vida de Cristina y Javier?
Joseph: “How are things with Cristina and Javier?” Now, in Newbie Lesson 2 it sounded like this:
José: ¿Y cómo están Cristina y Javier?
Joseph: “¿Y cómo están Cristina y Javier?” Beatrice, what do you think are the major differences here?
Beatriz: Well, the way the question is asked in the Newbie Series is the most direct way. However, in the Peruvian version, it’s a little more casual.
Joseph: Right! And if we were to translate this literally, we would say “What’s with Cristina and Javier’s life?” “Y qué es de la vida ” But because this is “modismo” an idiom, an idiomatic phrase, we must understand it as “How are things with Cristina and Javier?” or something along those lines.
Beatriz: Claro, es una frase muy común. This is a very common phrase. Actually, now that I think about it, I use it all the time.
Joseph: So, again, the standard way to say “And how are Cristina and Javier?” is:
José: ¿Y cómo están Cristina y Javier?
Joseph: “¿Y cómo están Cristina y Javier?” And in Peruvian Spanish we say:
Beatriz: ¿Y qué es de la vida de Cristina y Javier?
Joseph: “And how are things with Cristina and Javier?” Okay! Let’s go over some of the localisms that came up in the conversation. To begin, we’ll look at the expression “chambeando”. Beatrice, would you take us back to where this came up in the Peruvian Spanish conversation?
Beatriz: Ellos están bien, chambeando duro.
Joseph: “Very well, working hard.” Now, the word that we usually use for working is “trabajando”.
Beatriz: Así es. But in Peru we use the word “chambeando” which pretty much has the same meaning.
Joseph: Claro, lo que pasa es que es un jerga. It’s a slang term that’s only used in Peru.
Beatriz: Yes, if you say it to someone from a Northern Spanish speaking country. They’re probably wonder what do you mean.
Joseph: Man, that really seems to be wrapped up in Peruvian culture.
Beatriz: It is! “Una chamba” is another way of saying “un trabajo” or “a job”.
Joseph: “Una chamba”. And sometimes you say “una chambita”, in the diminutive form, right?
Beatriz: That’s right! “Una chambita” is more a like a temporary job like a gig, as you say in English.
Joseph: Now, there’s one more word that I’d like to look at. I’m talking about “chevere”.
Beatriz: “Chevere” Yes, yes! That’s a nerd one that you don’t hear often outside of Peru.
Joseph: “Chevere”. Could you explain what it means?
Beatriz: Bueno. As we see in the comparison of Newbie Lesson 2 and the Peruvian version word, the word “chevere” has replaced “que bueno” and we know that “que bueno” means “great”, so “chevere” is a slang term, “una jerga” which means “cool”.
Joseph: Chevere.
Beatriz: This expression is mostly used by young people. Or know that I think about it, you’ll hear more in Lima than in other parts in the country.
Joseph: Chevere. Bueno parece que mucha de la jerga peruana proviene de Lima. ¿Qué opinas?
Beatriz: Yes, yes, yes! This expression is mostly used by young people, and now that I think about it, you’ll hear more in Lima than other parts of the country.
Joseph: Interesante, chevere. Me gusta… Me gusta como suena.
OUTRO
Beatriz: That’s right! This wraps up today’s lesson.
Joseph: Be sure to reference this lesson with Newbie Lesson 2.
Beatriz: And to forget to try out the Spanish review in the Learning Center where you’ll find test questions, answers and comments on the answers.
Joseph: It’s a great way to start practicing on your own. Alright, until next time.
Beatriz: Hasta la próxima. ¡Chao!
Joseph: Chao

Convo - Peruvian Accent

Convo - Standard

9 Comments

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SpanishPod101.com
Saturday at 12:30 am
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¿Qué tipo de chamba tienen ustedes? (What kind of job do you have?) ¿Habían escuchado la palabra "chambear" antes de esta lección?

SpanishPod101.comVerified
Sunday at 9:26 am
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Hola Leanne,


Thank you for your comment.

Each country have different slang, sometimes they might seem similar but they mean complete different things.


Suerte,

Carla

Team SpanishPod101.com

Leanne
Wednesday at 10:28 pm
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Is Peruvian Spanish slang close to Ecuadorian Spanish slang at all?

joseph
Monday at 2:39 am
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Quique,


De nuevo estoy en deuda por las buenas ideas que nos has ofrecido. Yes, we've talked a lot about devoting time to discussing "chifa" (aka. Peruvian Chinese food) and all that is associated with it. Also, transportation is in our plans as well: el bus, el bus cama, micro, combi, taxi, moto taxi, and the phrases associated with these. Also idiosyncrasies like the "regateo", as you mention, and again, phrases that go along with this, like "cóbrame una china, que sólo voy hasta la izquina".


Another topic that we've been toying with is the "tratamientos" (forms of address), which is so characteristic of Perú, and which is particularly interesting in that they are more often than not endearing and not pejorative: "morenito, -a; negrito, -a; gringuito, -a; chinito, -a; zambito, -a; cholito, -a; flacquito, -a; gordito, -a; pelado, etc."


With Peruvian Spanish, I don't think it's very hard to come up with localisms to explain, mainly because Peruvians, in my opinion, have a lot of character in their speech. Yeah, I do know "nos vidrios" (for "nos vemos"). I also like "de fresa hasta alfonso"; "graciela" ( for "chela"); "lenteja" (for "lento"); among many more.


Another phenomenon I find interesting in Peruvian Spanish is the way that syllables in words are reversed, so instead of saying "japón", we can say "ponja"; instead of "baño", "ñoba"; instead of "hotel", "telo", etc. Can you think of any more? (I'm sure you can! :lol:)


I opened a thread in the forum "All About Spanish" entitled "Peruvian Regional Series". I suggest we include some of this discussion there as well. Your comments are really valuable to us, as you like all Peruvians know better than anyone the value of what we are doing in this series; and we hope that with your helpful comments and suggestions we can offer our students a course that introduces the world to Peruvian culture and the language which reflects it.


¡Agradeczo tu colaboración!


Joseph

Quique
Sunday at 2:58 pm
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Hi Joseph,


You must know the word "guachiman" and probably "gasfitero" . "guachiman" means "watchman" ...got the similarity? and "gasfitero" means "plumber" or "gasfitter" .

So, based on these examples I'll probably believe the explanation of "chambear" .


There's another interesting one that it's not very popular these days : "frigider" (fridge) that came from "Frigidaire" a maker of you guess what!


¿¿¿¿Chaufa???? ... ROFL ... There you have a topic : "Chifa" , AFAIK is not exactly the same as chinese food , from there you can go to the fact that Inka Kola is the best match for chifa because "Inka Kola con todo combina" then we can go to "Bembos" (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bembos) but from the chifa to the Bembos you'll take a taxi but you're not going to pay 20 soles for the ride so you're going to "regatear" the fare or take a "micro" maybe a "combi" and you need to understand expressions like "al fondo hay sitio" , "pague con sencillo", "esquina baja" and the infamous "pie derecho baja" ... well, just a few topics :smile:


Ahi nos vidrios .... (know that one?)


Regards

Quique

joseph
Sunday at 1:54 pm
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Quique,


¿Qué tal? That's an interesting explanation for the origin of the word "chambear". Do you think it's accurate? I haven't found another more believable definition yet, but I'm still looking. You know, this brings out a noteworthy aspect of colloquial language; it is difficult to nail down its origin, since it isn't "accepted" by the authorities. In any case, the definition at the url you cited is entertaining.


Si se te ocurriera alguna idea para una futura lección peruana me encantaría saberla. Este ciclo nos ofrece la oportunidad de dar a conocer el Perú tal como es. Pues, dime, ¿qué es lo que quisieras que el mundo conozca de tu país?


¡Chaufa!


Joseph

Quique
Sunday at 9:54 am
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Hi Joseph ,


How could I forget "choche"!!!!! ... :razz:


Yes, I'm from Lima but currently living in Japan. I'm listening the japanese podcast and I learned there about this site.


Do you know where does "chamba" come from? I googled it and got this : http://mx.answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20070917054415AAHawBd


Saludos

Quique

joseph
Saturday at 12:11 pm
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¡Hola, Quique!


¡Muschísimas gracias por los comentarios instructivos! That's some really great insight. Thanks so much for your comments. I think they really shed light on what we're trying to open the world up to. Also, I think it's a unique opportunity for other students to hear how you use these words. Parece que eres limeño... ¿me equivoco?


I've just recently learned that the verb "chambear" is also used in México. Tienes mucha razón que "una chambaza" is "toil", it's a "grueling job".


I'd also like to point out that "chochera" or "chocherita" could be shortened as well to "choche". I love that expression. Thanks again for helping to make this interesting!


¡Muchos saludos y que no te pierdas!


Joseph

Quique
Saturday at 11:24 am
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Hi!!!


¿Y qué es de la vida de Cristina y Javier? can be shortened to: ¿Y qué es de Cristina y Javier? for an even more casual expression.


"Chévere" ... well, most people understand the meaning of this expression but I think it's not very popular today. (I'm not anymore a teenager so I can be wrong). I thought this word came from Venezuela but I found this: http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chevere . If "Chévere" means cool then it makes me remember another expression that means "super cool" or something like that : "Chévere, pajita, pulenta" ... you can Google it, just don't use it :smile:


It's so funny that you teach the verb "chambear" , according to the RAE dictionary it's also used in other parts of Central and South America http://buscon.rae.es/draeI/SrvltConsulta?TIPO_BUS=3&LEMA=chamba .


For , "What kind of job do you have?" , you can try : "¿En qué chambeas?" or "¿De qué es tu chamba?" for very casual expressions.


Note that "chambaza" does not mean something like "a great job" , it means a very hard or difficult task. "Chambón" has the same meaning as "chambaza"


Your "pata" is also your "causa" or your "chochera"/"chocherita" and when you greet them I never say "Hola" , I use "Habla!" as in "Habla chochera!"


Congrats and keep up the good work.


Regards

Quique