Dialogue

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Beatriz: Bueno días me llamo Beatriz.
Joseph: Joseph here! Peruvian Spanish Series, Lesson 12 – “Would you like seconds?” My name is Joseph!
Beatriz: And I am Beatrice!
Joseph: Welcome to the twelve lesson of the Peruvian Spanish Series in Spanishpod101.com, where we cover pronunciation and intonation.
Beatriz: Pronunciación y entonación.
Joseph: Proper to the Spanish of Peru, by comparing Peruvian Spanish to the standard Spanish taught in the core curriculum of Spanishpod101! We give you the insider’s perspective on Peruvian Spanish. And we contextualize it for you by explaining Peruvian customs.
Beatriz: So, join us for this lesson of Spanishpod101.com!
Joseph: Last time we looked at some expressions related to food and we learned about the delicious Peruvian dish “ají de gallina”.
Beatriz: Uyuyuy
Joseph: That’s right! We also looked at that expression, too. “uyuyuy”. In today’s conversation, Pablito finds himself in a very common situation at the lunch table with his aunt Lucha, who is absolutely determined to get him to have a second help in.
Beatriz: This always happens in Peruvian families.
Joseph: That’s right! Remember to reference this lesson with Newbie Lesson 12 – “I’m full!” for a deeper understanding of the comparisons that we’re about to make in this lesson. Also, be sure to check out the line by line audio transcripts in the Learning Center at Spanishpod101.com, where you can hear the lesson conversation one line at a time, and then record your own voice and play it back. It’s such a cool function, don’t you think?
Beatriz: ¡Me encanta!
Joseph: Yeah, a mí también. Okay! So, in Newbie Lesson 12 we heard the following conversation:
DIALOGUE - NORMAL
TÍA ROSA: ¿Quieres más, Felipe?
FELIPE: No, gracias, tía. Ya estoy lleno.
TÍA ROSA: ¿Y tú, Juana?
JUANA: Estoy satisfecha. Usted prepara muy bien el cebiche.
TÍA ROSA: ¿Ustedes están seguros?
FELIPE: Gracias tía, pero estamos repletos.
Joseph: This time with the translation! Ahora incluiremos la traducción.
TÍA ROSA: ¿Quieres más, Felipe?
JUANA: “Do you want more, Felipe?”
FELIPE: No, gracias, tía. Ya estoy lleno.
FELIPE: “No, thanks, Aunt Rosa, I’m full.”
TÍA ROSA: ¿Y tú, Juana?
JUANA: “And you, Juana?”
JUANA: Estoy satisfecha. Usted prepara muy bien el cebiche.
JUANA: “I’m satisfied. You prepare the cebiche very well.”
TÍA ROSA: ¿Ustedes están seguros?
JUANA: “Are you all sure?”
FELIPE: Gracias tía, pero estamos repletos.
FELIPE: “Thank you, Aunt Rosa, but we’re stuffed.”
DIALOGUE - PERUVIAN
Joseph: Now, let’s hear what this could sound like in Peruvian Spanish.
TÍA LUCHA: ¿Quisieras repetir, Pablito?
PABLITO: No, gracias, tía. ¡Pero el cebiche fue un manjar!
TÍA LUCHA: ¡Ay, pero te conozco, Pablito! ¡Déjame servirte un poco más!
PABLITO: No, no, gracias, tía, ahí no más. De verdad, ya no puedo.
TÍA LUCHA: ¿¡Pero, si estás tan flaco!? ¡No fastidies, oye, come no más! ¡No seas chiflado!
PABLITO: Bueno, tía... Está bien... Sírveme...
Joseph: Once again, slowly! Una vez más, esta vez lentamente.
TÍA LUCHA: ¿Quisieras repetir, Pablito?
PABLITO: No, gracias, tía. ¡Pero el cebiche fue un manjar!
TÍA LUCHA: ¡Ay, pero te conozco, Pablito! ¡Déjame servirte un poco más!
PABLITO: No, no, gracias, tía, ahí no más. De verdad, ya no puedo.
TÍA LUCHA: ¿¡Pero, si estás tan flaco!? ¡No fastidies, oye, come no más! ¡No seas chiflado!
PABLITO: Bueno, tía... Está bien... Sírveme...
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Beatriz: Tantas diferencias y tan poco tiempo para explicarlas.
Joseph: Yes, there are a lot of differences here, but we’ll do our best to explain them. Beatrice, to start out, let’s look at the way “Do you want more, Felipe?” was pronounced in the Peruvian version. Could you repeat that for us, please?
Beatriz: ¿Quisieras repetir, Pablito?
Joseph: “Would you like seconds, Pablito?” Now, in Newbie Lesson 12 it sounded like this:
TÍA ROSA: ¿Quieres más, Felipe?
Joseph: Beatrice, what do you think are the major differences here?
Beatriz: Obviamente el nombre Felipe cambió.
Joseph: Right! Of course, the name Felipe changed to Pablito, but I’m talking about the phrase “¿Quisieras repetir?”. In the Newbie Lesson we just hear:
TÍA ROSA: ¿Quieres más, Felipe?
Joseph: What’s going on there?
Beatriz: Bueno si dices “¿Quieres más?” la pregunta suena muy directa.
Joseph: That’s a good start! So, if we say “¿Quieres más?” the question sounds really direct. It’s like saying “Do you want more?” And if we say “Quiesaras” instead of “Quieres” how does the meaning change?
Beatriz: “Quisieras” is like saying “Would you like?” instead of “Do you want?”
Joseph: That’s a good one to know! And this form “quisieras” is the more polite way to ask if someone wants something, right?
Beatriz: ASí es. That’s right!
Joseph: Now, if you really want to impress your friends, you can tell them that this is called the Imperfect Tense of the Subjunctive Mood. But really, all you need to remember for now is that “quisieras” is more polite than “quieres”. Now, another word “repetir”. Beatrice, we didn’t hear that one in the Newbie Lesson neither. So, what exactly does “repetir” mean?
Beatriz: It means “to repeat”.
Joseph: “To repeat”, right! And what about the way it’s used in this conversation?
Beatriz: En este sentido significa comer otra porción de comida.
Joseph: So, in this sentence it means to eat another portion of food. So, we can say that this question “¿Quisieras repetir?” is something like “Would you like seconds?” or “Would you like a second help in?”
Beatriz: Así es.
Joseph: So, again, the standard way to say “Do you want more, Felipe?” is:
TÍA ROSA: ¿Quieres más, Felipe?
Joseph: And in the Peruvian Spanish version we hear:
Beatriz: ¿Quisieras repetir, Pablito?
Joseph: “Would you like seconds, Pablito?” All right! Next we’ll look at the way “Are you sure?” was rendered in Peruvian Spanish. Beatrice, could you take us back to where we heard that?
Beatriz: ¿¡Pero, si estás tan flaco!? ¡No fastidies, oye, come no más! ¡No seas chiflado!
Joseph: “But if you’re so skinny, you must be joking. Come on! Just eat! Don’t be crazy!” Now, in Newbie Lesson 12 it sounded like this:
TÍA ROSA: ¿Ustedes están seguros?
Joseph: Beatrice, these two versions barely look anything alike. What’s going on here?
Beatriz: Bueno esque en el Perú es fácil que tía o tu madre o alguna persona cercana a ti trate de convencerte para servirte un poco más.
Joseph: Right! So, in Peru it’s really common for your aunt or your mother or someone else who is close to you to try to convince you to eat more, they always want to serve you more, it’s a crazy custom.
Beatriz: Yes! Claro, esque busca algún motivo para servirte más ya que así expresan su cariño y consideración.
Joseph: So, in this way, she’s looking for a reason to serve you more food and this is a way of expressing her love or her endearment for you. And that expression “no fastidies”, what’s going on with that one?
Beatriz: En ese sentido quiere decir “no me hagas esas bromas”.
Joseph: Right, right! That’s what I was thinking. So, the expression “no fastidies” means something like “You must be joking.” or “Quit joking around.” Now, after that, she says “come no más” which is like saying “Come on, just eat!”
Beatriz: Claro, esas señoras pueden ser bien tercas, no se dan por vencidas.
Joseph: That’s right! These women can be very stubborn and they won’t give in for anything. And the last thing she says ¡No seas chiflado!”. Bea, what does that mean?
Beatriz: It’s just like saying “Don’t be crazy!”
Joseph: Right! “Don’t be crazy!” “Chiflado”. So, again, the standard way to say “Are you sure?” is:
TÍA ROSA: ¿Ustedes están seguros?
Joseph: And in the Peruvian Spanish version we hear:
Beatriz: ¿¡Pero, si estás tan flaco!? ¡No fastidies, oye, come no más! ¡No seas chiflado!
Joseph: “But if you’re so skinny, you must be joking! Come on, just eat! Don’t be crazy!” Okay, let’s go over some of the localisms that came up in the conversation. To begin, we’ll look at the expression “manjar”. Beatrice, would you take us back to where this came up in the Peruvian Spanish conversation?
Beatriz: ¡Pero el cebiche fue un manjar!
Joseph: “But the cebiche was a delicacy!” Now, Beatrice, two questions. What does the word “manjar”mean and why does Pablito’s Aunt Lucia insist that he eats more? Let’s begin with the word “manjar”. What does “manjar” mean?
Beatriz: “Manjar” is something extremely delicious.
Joseph: Okay! So, “manjar” is something that’s very, very good. It’s a delicacy. Now, we’ve looked at some other words to describe something that you really like to eat, like other adjectives like “riquisimo, rico, delicioso”. How do those compare to “manjar”?
Beatriz: “Manjar” is something very special. It doesn’t have to be something big, it’s always something special. It’s something little, but it’s very, very special.
Joseph: Right! So, could we say “Es poco pero rico”?
Beatriz: Poco pero rico o poco pero bueno.
Joseph: “Poco pero bueno”. Right! So, it’s a small portion, but it’s really delicious. “Manjar” is like something that just makes him mouth water, it’s so delicious, right?
Beatriz: Yes, it’s something really good.
Joseph: And there’s another meaning for “manjar” also, right? Like “manjar de leche”, right?
Beatriz: You’re talking about “dulce de leche”. We call in in Spanish “manjar blanco”. It’s sugar with milk, you know, reduced.
Joseph: So, it’s condensed milk that is caramelized. And when the sugar caramelizes it turns brown and it kind of changes into this thick, creamy, spreadable, sweet caramel, and you use it for a lot of different cakes and the famous “churros”. And the “churros” are tubes of fried dough which are filled with this sweet filling. Beatrice, the other thing I want to make sure we cover here is “la insistencia de la Tía Lucha” “the insistence of Aunt Lucia” here. She just won’t stop at anything until Pablito eats more. So, what exactly is she expressing when she insists like this?
Beatriz: Ella expresa su preocupación a que la persona en su casa se sienta agusto.
Joseph: Okay! So, by insisting in this way, she expresses her consideration, her love, so that the person in her home is comfortable.
Beatriz: Yes, and it’s like a respect, you know? If you are in someone’s house, it’s the kind of love and respect that you’re going to get from this person, this family.
Joseph: But it seems to be “algun tipo de contradicción”, some kind of a contradiction here, because it doesn’t look like Pablito wants to eat more. So, how is that considerate if he doesn’t want to eat?
Beatriz: That’s a good question! Si vas a la casa de alguien, de alguna tía, abuela, madre o alguna señora, es muy común que te sirvan mucho o aveces muy poco pero de esa forma expresan su cariño.
Joseph: So, they’re going to give you either a big portion or a small portion, but that’s how they’re showing their love and consideration for you. But, even if you don’t want it?
Beatriz: Muchas veces es así, si es que te vas a algun pueblito de la sierra y eres recibido en alguna familia y si te ofrecen por ejemplo cuy chactado es mejor que lo comas.
Joseph: Okay! So, if you go to a small town up in the highlands and they serve you something like “tiny peg” it’s better that you eat it, because if you don’t, you’re going to offend them, right?
Beatriz: That’s right!
OUTRO
Joseph: Okay! It’s so interesting to learn these kind of idiosyncrasies.
Beatriz: Yes, it is very important, I think so, too.
Joseph: Okay! This wraps up today’s lesson. Be sure to reference this lesson with Newbie Lesson 12.

Dialogue - Peruvian

Dialogue - Standard

12 Comments

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SpanishPod101.com
Friday at 6:30 pm
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Now, as we've said, this "insistence" is really common in Perú. Has anyone experienced it before? Does this kind of thing happen in your culture? It would be interesting to find out...

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SpanishPod101.com
Monday at 10:25 pm
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Hola Abby,


Thank you for your comment.

We're happy to know you are enjoying the lessons.

As for “I’m stuffed!” you can also say "Estoy my lleno", "Estoy repleto"

Sigamos practicando.


Saludos,

Carla

Team SpanishPod101.com

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Abby
Sunday at 11:57 pm
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Hay una mejor manera coloquial de decir. "I'm stuffed!". en vez de decir... Estoy lleno o no puedo más.?

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Abby
Sunday at 11:51 pm
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Estoy disfrutando mucho esta serie peruana con Joseph. Estas frases son muy útiles y las explicaciones y situaciones para usarlas son maravillosas.

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SpanishPod101.com
Thursday at 12:08 pm
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Hola Steven,


Thank you for your feedbacks.

We'll report them ASAP.

Thank you again for your assistance.:thumbsup:


Saludos,

Carla

Team SpanishPod101.com

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steven
Saturday at 1:47 am
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1. In the transcript, there are a couple of places where the speaker says "second helping", but it is written as "second help in".


2. From the expanded vocab:


Él tiene la mala fama de ser terco.


I think the speaker does not include the word "mala".


3. From the dialog, "come no más" is translated as "just eat". Literally, it would be "eat no more", so this must be some idiomatic expression? Is it used in other expressions? "bebe no más"? "trabaja no más"? etc.

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Joseph
Saturday at 12:02 am
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Dejarse comer... let me think... let's say that you're at the table in your girlfriend's house. Her mom has made a very delicious meal, but it's a meal that not all foreigners like (for example, Cau Cau which is like chillied tripe). And you're really enjoying the meal. You finish your plate before anyone else, and her mother says to you "Oye, Rodney, parece que tenías hambre" (Hey, Rodney, it looks like you were hungry). Now, one way to respond is "no, señora, de hecho no tenía mucha hambre. Lo que pasa es que se deja comer. ¡Qué rico!" (no, ma'am, in fact I wasn't really hungry. The thing is that it lets itself be eaten. How delicious!).


A couple of notes: 1) I've only every heard this expression in Lima, but, because of the way it's formed grammatically, I would imagine that other Spanish-speakers would be able to understand the meaning and the humor, even if they don't say it customarily. 2) I mistyped in my last post: not "se dejar" , but "se deja" for singular and "se dejan" for plural; this is reflexive: it let's itself, or they let themselves.


¡Provecho!

Joseph

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Rodney
Friday at 4:56 am
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Thanks, I really enjoyed this lesson and your comments are very helpful.


" se dejar comer" - Could you give me an example of how to use this? And is this a peruvian expression as well?

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Joseph
Friday at 1:45 am
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Rodney,


Good questions. With this line, "Tia Lucha: no fastidies, oye, come no más! !No seas chiflado!", I would say that tere are two main factors that distinguish this as "Peruvian". 1) the placement of the command "oye" in the middle of the sentence, and 2) "no más". Now, this is not to say that this would only be understood in Peru, but, on the other hand, if I were to hear someone say it like this, it would definitely make me think that they (or their Spanish) is from Peru.


If I were to rephrase it, I might say something like... "no me hagas rogarte" (don't make me beg you)...come un poquito más (eat a little more)... "no seas loco" (don't be crazy).


As for "quisieras repetir" and "quisieras más", yes, you can definitely use "más" here and be understood, but "repetir" is very common, in Peru, as in most Spanish speaking countries. For example, I could say "me gustó la comida tánto que repetí tres veces" (I liked the mean so much that I had three helpings).


Another expression that comes to mind (I'm thinking of a Peruvian friend who says this) has to do with food that you really like. Let's say you're eating "cebiche" and take the first bite. It's delicious. You can say "este cebiche es repetible". The word "repetible" literally means "repeatable", but in this context it means that it's something that you'll be happy to have more than one helping of.


And finally, now that you've got me talking about food (one of my favorite topics), another expression you can use is "se dejar comer". This is a really funny one! Literally it means "it let's itself be eaten". The humor of it comes from the fact that you're saying that it's the food which is the reason why you're eating so much: it let's itself be eaten, but not that it's me who wants to eat so much of it. Heheh...


Let me know if you have any other questions. Hope these explanations help.


Saludos y suerte!

Joseph

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Rodney
Thursday at 5:10 am
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Pablito: ahí no más.


Tia Lucha: no fastidies, oye, come no más! !No seas chiflado!


They seem to be rather nuetral to me, but if not, is there something else you could say that would be equally colloquial and commonly understood?


Also, in addition to 'Quisieras repetir', could you also say 'Quisieras más'?

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Joseph
Thursday at 2:53 am
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Rodney,

Which expressions in particular are you talking about? I'd be happy to clarify as best I can, if you let me know which ones your talking about.

Saludos,

Joseph