Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Megan: ¡Bienvenidos a Spanishpod101.com!
David: ¡Buenos días! Soy David.
Megan: And I’m Megan. Iberian Spanish Series, Lesson 13.
David: “¡Qué bueno!”, “How good!”
Megan: Hello and welcome to Spanishpod101.com. My name is Megan and I’m joined here by David. ¿Qué tal, David?
David: Muy bien, Megan. Today we have the thirteenth lesson of the Iberian Spanish Series.
Megan: Here we’ll cover the pronunciation and intonation of Spanish as it’s spoken in Spain, in particularly in Madrid.
David: By comparing Iberian speech to the standard Spanish taught in the core curriculum of Spanishpod101, we give you the insider’s perspective on Iberian Spanish.
Megan: And we contextualize it for you by explaining Iberian customs.
David: So, join us for this lesson of Spanishpod101.com!
Megan: Last time we looked at a family meal and all sorts of things that could happen there. Today we’re going to talk about food again in different ways that we express how much we like it.
David: Today’s lesson references Newbie Lesson 13 – “How delicious!”, so be sure to check that out on our website.
Megan: Also in this lesson we’ll talk some more about the Spanish love of seafood.
David: Check out the transcripts and translations in the PDF for this lesson at Spanishpod101.com!
Megan: To get started let’s go back to Newbie Lesson 13 where we heard the following conversation:
DIALOGUE
HUMBERTO: ¡Qué rica la paella!
CLAUDIA: ¡Qué gustosa está!
HUMBERTO: Los mariscos están exquisitos.
CLAUDIA: Sí, están muy jugosos.
HUMBERTO: ¡Qué bien preparada está la paella!
M3: This time, with the translation. Ahora, incluiremos la traducción.
HUMBERTO: ¡Qué rica la paella!
M3: “What delicious paella.”
CLAUDIA: ¡Qué gustosa está!
F3: “How tasty it is!”
HUMBERTO: Los mariscos están exquisitos.
M3: “The shellfish are exquisite.”
CLAUDIA: Sí, están muy jugosos.
F3: “Yes, they’re very juicy!”
HUMBERTO: ¡Qué bien preparada está la paella!
M3: “How well prepared this paella is.”
Megan: Now let’s hear what that sounds like in Iberian Spanish:
David: ¡Qué bueno está este bocata de calamares!
Megan: Es verdad, están super crujientes.
David: Si ahora me ofreces un centollo a cambio… No sé si te lo cambiaría.
Megan: Bueno, David, que solo es un bocadillo.
David: Pero es que hacía tiempo que no tomaba uno tan bueno.
E: Once again, slowly! Una vez más, esta vez lentamente.
David: ¡Qué bueno está este bocata de calamares!
Megan: Es verdad, están super crujientes.
David: Si ahora me ofreces un centollo a cambio… No sé si te lo cambiaría.
Megan: Bueno, David, que sólo es un bocadillo.
David: Pero es que hacía tiempo que no tomaba uno tan bueno.
E: This time with the translation. Ahora incluiremos la traducción.
David: “¡Qué bueno está este bocata de calamares!” - “This calamari sandwich is so good!”
Megan: “Es verdad, están super crujientes.” - “I know! They’re amazingly crunchy!”
David: “Si ahora me ofreces un centollo a cambio… No sé si te lo cambiaría” - “Even if you offered me some of your spaded crab, I don’t think I would switch with you.”
Megan: “Bueno, David, que sólo es un bocadillo” - “Come on, David! It’s just a sandwich!”
David: “Pero es que hacía tiempo que no tomaba uno tan bueno” - “Yes, but it’s just that it’s been so long since I’ve had one this good.”
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Megan: Okay, David! What is this conversation about today? It seems like you get mad about a sandwich. I actually had a lot of trouble translating this dialogue into English because it’s such a cultural thing.
David: Yes, but come on! It’s not just any sandwich. We’re talking about calamari sandwich.
Megan: Calamari, right!
David: Yes, and you know that here in Spain, we love to eat almost everything that comes from the sea and food like calamari is really popular. And I know you like it, too!
Megan: I do love “bocadillos de calamares”. I live really close to the Plaza Mayor in Madrid, and during “Navidades” or Christmas time you can see everyone out with their families eating their “bocadillos de calamares” in the streets. It’s crazy because you could see old ladies in fur inked mink coats, little kids, hipsters, old “castizo” guys, whom we talked about back in the lesson in the past. It’s obviously a huge tradition in Madrid.
David: Yes, very much. And I really love to eat one of those “bocadillos” in “la Plaza Mayor”.
Megan: Okay! Now let’s get into the fun part. What can you tell us?
David: Hey, I want to talk about the word “paella”.
Megan: Okay, for any particular reason?
David: Well, it’s not really in the Iberian conversation, but there are some interesting points.
Megan: Okay! So, in the Newbie Lesson we heard:
C: ¡Qué rica la paella!
Megan: And in the Iberian version it sounded like:
David: ¡Qué bueno está este bocata de calamares!
Megan: The two sound very different.
David: Yes, in the standard version they used the adjective “rica” which is the singular, feminine version for “tasty” since “paella” is a feminine noun. And I used the adjective “bueno” which is the singular, masculine version for “good” since “bocata” is a masculine noun.
Megan: One quick question about “bocata”, I noticed that it ends in an “A”, but you said that it’s masculine. Can you explain that?
David: Yes, “bocata” is the short form for “bocadillo” and “bocadillo” is a masculine noun and “bocata” keeps the masculine gender.
Megan: Okay! So, going back to what you’re saying, both “bueno” and “rico” are used a lot in Spain when talking about food. I mean, I could’ve used one or the other and it wouldn’t have made much difference, would it?
David: Right! But let me talk about the word “paella” first.
Megan: Okay!
David: “Paella” is a Spanish word and more specifically from Valencia, since “paella” is a specialty from Valencia. I once heard someone in London said “paella”, and wow, maybe he thought it was an Italian dish, but it isn’t.
Megan: Yes, it could be that or it could be that he just needs to study Spanish.
David: Yes, sure! But, here in Spain you could hear “paella” pronounced in two different ways. The first one, Megan, can you say “saltar” in English?
Megan: Sure, “jump”.
David: Okay! So, take just the first part, “ju”, the sound would be very similar.
Megan: “Paella”.
David: Yes, very similar.
Megan: This is the way the “Y” is usually pronounced in Madrid. “Paella”.
David: Yes.
Megan: Yo no lo digo bien, que...
David: Ya.
Megan: I was going to have you say “ya”.
David: Okay!
Megan: Because I don’t say it right.
David: Okay!
Megan: Paella.
David: Okay, yes, that’s fine.
Megan: I have a little trouble with that sound, to be honest. Okay! So, this is the way the “Y” is usually pronounced in Madrid. Do you remember when we talked about the word “ya” a few lessons back?
David: Right! And now you have said “ya” very good.
Megan: Okay, good! Okay! That’s the sound we’re looking for, similar to the English sound in “jump”. “Ju”.
David: Okay! And we’d say there are two ways we can pronounce “paella”. The second way for pronouncing “paella” is “paella”. “Paella”.
Megan: Right! And here the “LL” sound which is the double L in Spanish is more like the sound in the English word “million”, that sort of LY sound. “Million”. You put your tongue on your paled and you let the air pass by on both sides of the tongue. It’s not the easiest sound to make.
David: No, not really. We now pronounce the “Y” and the double “L” the same, as “ye”, “pollo”, “chicken” and “apoyo”, “support”.
Megan: Right! So, the double “L” and the “Y” are basically pronounced the same way. And there’s even a word for that, it’s called “yeísmo” that means that everything is pronounced the same as the “Y”. But there’re still some places in Castile and in other parts of Spain where you can hear the double “L” or the “Y” differentiated, like what you said.
David: Yes, for example in Valladolid, they say it’s the city where they speak the best Castilian in the Spain.
Megan: I have to say I don’t quite believe in one Spanish being better than another, but Valladolid is a nice city to visit. That is when it’s not too cold up there. Okay! Why don’t we talk about some of the expressions that came up in today’s conversation?
David: Sure! You know what a “bocata” is, right?
Megan: Well, “bocata” is a really informal short form for “bocadillo”, so I wouldn’t expect to see that in a bar menu, though I actually have a few times. I guess they put it on there to sound cute. But, I would’ve translated it “bocadillo” or “bocata” as “sandwich”, and here in Spain you also use the word “sandwich”.
David: Right! We use “sandwich”, but for those sandwiches prepared with “pan de molde”. How do you call this in English?
Megan: In the United States we call it “wonder bread” or “white bread”, and here in Spain you say “pan de molde”.
David: Yes, and you can even hear very often that people call it “pan bimbo”, because Bimbo is the brand that first sold this kind of bread. This “pan de molde” is used for what we call “sandwich”.
Megan: Right! Okay! So, a “bocadillo” is different. When you order a “bocadillo” you get a sandwich but with that kind of hard French bread. What do you call that kind of bread in Spanish?
David: Well, we can call it in different ways. We can say “una barra de pan”.
Megan: Right! But there’s another funnier way to say it.
David: Well, funny word or funny Ha-ha?
Megan: Kind of both.
David: Yes, we also call it “una pistola”.
Megan: “A pistol”. So, you go to the bakery and you say “una pistola, por favor”, and won’t the guy behind the counter be afraid?
David: No, he knows.
Megan: Okay! So, let’s compare the very last sentence in both dialogues.
David: Sure! In Newbie Lesson we heard:
C: ¡Qué bien preparada está la paella!
Megan: And in the Iberian version we heard:
David: Pero es que hacía tiempo que no tomaba uno tan bueno.
Megan: Well, I think it’s interesting to notice that we use the adjective “bueno” when we say that a meal is good. “El bocadillo está bueno”.
David: Hey, and notice you’re using the verb “estar” instead of “ser”.
Megan: That’s true! We use “estar” whenever we talk about the temporary qualities of something like food. But back to the comparison of the standard and the Iberian versions, notice that we use the adjective “bueno” or “good” when we say that the food is good and the adverb “bien” in a similar way when we say in English “It’s well cooked” or “bien hecho”.
David: “Está bien preparada”. Other examples, “está bien hecho”.
Megan: Which means “It’s well done.”
David: “Ser bien educado”.
Megan: Which means “to be well educated” or “well mannered”. “Bien” is an adverb and “bueno” is an adjective, but I think we’ll have to devote some more time to “bien” in future lessons, because right now we’re out of time.

Outro

David: Well, that will do it for today’s lesson.
Megan: Remember that this lesson references Newbie Lesson 13 which you can pick up at Spanishpod101.com and while you are there make sure to check out the grammar point in this lesson’s PDF. See you soon!
David: ¡Nos vemos pronto!

Dialogue - Iberian

Dialogue - Standard

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SpanishPod101.comVerified
Thursday at 6:30 pm
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What's you're favorite octopus recipe? My favorite is "pulpo al olivo", blanched octopus, drizzled in olive oil. It doesn't get any better than that!

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Tuesday at 6:49 pm
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Hola Connie,


Thanks for your positive feedback and let us know if you have any questions!


Cheers,


Khanh

Team SpanishPod101.com

Connie
Friday at 12:08 pm
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Good lesson.