Dialogue

Vocabulary

Learn New Words FAST with this Lesson’s Vocab Review List

Get this lesson’s key vocab, their translations and pronunciations. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account Now and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Notes

Unlock In-Depth Explanations & Exclusive Takeaways with Printable Lesson Notes

Unlock Lesson Notes and Transcripts for every single lesson. Sign Up for a Free Lifetime Account and Get 7 Days of Premium Access.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Natalia: Buenos días me llamo Natalia.
Carlos: What’s going on? My name is Carlos, newbie series, season 2, lesson #20.
Natalia: Asking for permission.
Carlos: What’s going on pod101 world and welcome to spanishpod101.com, the fastest, easiest and most fun way to learn Spanish.
Natalia: I am Natalia and thanks again for being here with us for this newbie series, season 2 lesson.
Carlos: Okay Natie, the time has come for Adolfo.
Natalia: Why?
Carlos: Well he is having the conversation with Martha’s father, Señor Fuentes.
Natalia: Ah so he is breaking the news.
Carlos: Yeah and he makes a big mistake.
Natalia: What? Not speaking formally?
Carlos: No, no, no, no Natie, something worse. What about grammar?
Natalia: Well today we tackle the preterit.
Carlos: Uh okay I am waiting for that. Now you know what, before we listen to the conversation
Natalia: We want to ask.
Carlos: Do you read lesson notes while you listen?
Natalia: We received an email about the study tip.
Carlos: So we were wondering if you’ve tried it and if so
Natalia: What do you think of it?
Carlos: You know you can leave us some feedback in the comments section of this lesson okay.
Natalia: Let’s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
ADOLFO: Buenas tardes, Señor.
SR. FUENTES: Pase adelante, lo estaba esperando. ¿Un café?
ADOLFO: Un doble, por favor. Me imagino que sabe, usted, a lo que vengo.
SR. FUENTES: A pedir la mano de mi hija, mi orgullo.
ADOLFO: ¡Qué bien que tomó tan bien la noticia del embarazo!
SR. FUENTES: ¿Cuál embarazo?
ADOLFO: Ehhhh... el de su orgullo.
SR. FUENTES: ¡Qué...! ¡Corre, muchacho, corre!
Carlos: And now slower. Una vez más esta vez lentamente.
ADOLFO: Buenas tardes, Señor.
SR. FUENTES: Pase adelante, lo estaba esperando. ¿Un café?
ADOLFO: Un doble, por favor. Me imagino que sabe, usted, a lo que vengo.
SR. FUENTES: A pedir la mano de mi hija, mi orgullo.
ADOLFO: ¡Qué bien que tomó tan bien la noticia del embarazo!
SR. FUENTES: ¿Cuál embarazo?
ADOLFO: Ehhhh... el de su orgullo.
SR. FUENTES: ¡Qué...! ¡Corre, muchacho, corre!
Carlos: And now with the translation. Ahora incluiremos la traducción.
ADOLFO: Buenas tardes, Señor.
ADOLFO: Good evening, Sir.
SR. FUENTES: Pase adelante, lo estaba esperando. ¿Un café?
MR. FUENTES: Come in, I was waiting for you. Would you like an espresso?
ADOLFO: Un doble, por favor. Me imagino que sabe, usted, a lo que vengo.
ADOLFO: A double, please. I imagine that you, Sir, know why I have come here
SR. FUENTES: A pedir la mano de mi hija, mi orgullo.
MR. FUENTES: To ask for the hand of my daughter, my pride.
ADOLFO: ¡Qué bien que tomó tan bien la noticia del embarazo! }
ADOLFO: You took the news about the pregnancy really well!
SR. FUENTES: ¿Cuál embarazo?
MR. FUENTES: What pregnancy?
ADOLFO: Ehhhh... el de su orgullo.
ADOLFO: Uhhhh... your prides...
SR. FUENTES: ¡Qué...! ¡Corre, muchacho, corre!
MR. FUENTES: What? Run, boy, run!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Natalia: Wow! So funny.
Carlos: Talk about putting your foot in your mouth.
Natalia: What would you do in a situation like that?
Carlos: Run.
Natalia: Well run but how do you get out of it?
Carlos: I don’t know. It’s like oh man! You’ve come to ask my hand. Oh man, you are checking it so well. I mean you know what happened, we just met in the club and she just got pregnant. I don’t know. You know how it is.
Natalia: He was pretty dumb.
Carlos: You’ve been young one time. What are you doing with that gun?
Natalia: No, no, no that’s called talking too much.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Carlos: Okay that happens sometimes. Well you know what, let’s take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson. First up tenemos un verbo.
Natalia: imaginar
Carlos: To imagine, to assume.
Natalia: i-ma-gi-nar, imaginar.
Carlos: ¿Y un ejemplo sería?
Natalia: Me imagino que sabes mucho sobre la cultura local.
Carlos: I assume you know very much about the local culture. A continuación tenemos el sustantivo.
Natalia: orgullo
Carlos: Pride
Natalia: or-gu-llo, orgullo.
Carlos: ¿Como por ejemplo?
Natalia: El entrenador expresó su orgullo por haber podido trabajar con el equipo.
Carlos: The coach expressed his pride for having worked with the team. La proxima palabra es un verbo.
Natalia: pedir
Carlos: To ask for
Natalia: pe-dir
Carlos: ¿Como por ejemplo?
Natalia: Pediste un plato de arroz con pollo.
Carlos: You asked for a dish of rice with chicken. Y ahora estudiaremos otro sustantivo masculino.
Natalia: embarazo
Carlos: Pregnancy.
Natalia: em-ba-ra-zo, embarazo
Carlos: Y el ejemplo sería...
Natalia: ¿Ya le dijiste del embarazo o todavía no?
Carlos: Have you already told them about the pregnancy or haven’t you yet? La proxima palabra es...
Natalia: cual
Carlos: Which.
Natalia: cual, cual
Carlos: Como por ejemplo.
Natalia: ¿Cual quisieras escoger, el carro rojo o el azul?
Carlos: Which car would you like to pick, the red or the blue one? Y la última palabra de hoy es un sustantivo masculino o femenino.
Natalia: muchacho, muchacha
Carlos: Boy, girl.
Natalia: mu-cha-cho, mu-cha-cha, muchacho, muchacha
Carlos: A ver otro ejemplillo, Natie.
Natalia: Es un muchacho especialmente callado,
Carlos: He is an especially quiet boy.
Natalia: Carlos.
Carlos: Yeah.
Natalia: embarazada
Carlos: embarazada
Natalia: Imaginate cual es la que está embarazada.
Carlos: Well you said that a little fast Natie.
Natalia: Imaginate cual es la que está embarazada.
Carlos: Imagina...
Natalia: Imaginate cual es la que está embarazada.
Carlos: See this is not fair. You see how fast she is doing this. I am trying to learn and she is trying to…
Natalia: Imaginate cual es la...
Carlos: Imaginate...
Natalia: Let me finish the sentence.
Carlos: But I need to – it’s different parts.
Natalia: Imaginate
Carlos: Imagina
Natalia: Imaginate
Carlos: Imani...
Natalia: Ima
Carlos: Imaginate
Natalia: cual
Carlos: cual
Natalia: es
Carlos: es
Natalia: la
Carlos: la
Natalia: que
Carlos: que
Natalia: está
Carlos: está
Natalia: embarazada
Carlos: embarazada
Natalia: Imaginate cual es la que está embarazada.
Carlos: Yeah.
Natalia: Say it.
Carlos: Imagina...
Natalia: Imaginate cual es
Carlos: Imaginate cual es
Natalia: la que está embarazada
Carlos: la que está embarazada
Natalia: Imaginate cual es la que está embarazada.
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Carlos: Yeah okay I am not doing that fast. Okay let’s closely look at the usage for some of the words or phrases from this lesson.
Natalia: The first one we will look at is imaginar, to imagine, to assume.
Carlos: Imaginar. Natie, what’s this verb mean?
Natalia: To imagine or to assume.
Carlos: One of my favorite things.
Natalia: You know what they say about people who assume?
Carlos: Well ssh Natie, this is a podcast it’s PG.
Natalia: Carlos, how about this example?
Carlos: You read my mind.
Natalia: No puedes imaginar cuanto me enfadé.
Carlos: You can’t imagine how anger I was. I don’t believe that. You are pretty easy to read when you are angry.
Natalia: Any ways Carlos, please, I am like so calm and peaceful.
Carlos: But Natie, how is it used in today’s conversation?
Natalia: Me imagino que sabe, usted, a lo que vengo.
Carlos: I imagine that you sir know why I have come here. Man, is he in for a surprise? See never assume.
Natalia: Good advice. Here are some words that relate.
Carlos: Shoot.
Natalia: How about the feminine noun imaginación.
Carlos: They always said I had a very active imagination.
Natalia: Next up is one that’s dear to your heart.
Carlos: Which?
Natalia: orgullo
Carlos: orgullo
Natalia: Then what does it mean?
Carlos: It’s a masculine noun that means pride.
Natalia: Carlos, come on what other?
Carlos: Okay well that…
Natalia: Things are in this conversation?
Carlos: Natie let me ask you this. How was it used in today’s conversation?
Natalia: A pedir la mano de mi hija, mi orgullo.
Carlos: To ask for the hand of my daughter, my pride. So really, here it is being used like the English saying like my pride and joy.
Natalia: Exactly but it can also be used as an adjective orgulloso, orgullosa.
Carlos: So that would describe someone is proud or prideful. Natie eres muy orgulloso.
Natalia: Orgullosa, Carlos.
Carlos: Oh that’s right concordance sorry. Natie, see, even when I am trying to insult her, she corrects me.
Natalia: Imagine that.
Carlos: Natie, eres muy orgullosa.
Natalia: Un poquito. I am very proud especially of spanishpod101.com
Carlos: And you say I have the shameless plugs.
Natalia: Allow me. Next up we have pedir.
Carlos: Another verb, cool. What does it mean?
Natalia: Pedir means to ask for.
Carlos: Okay like, pedir algo a alguien.
Natalia: Pedir algo a alguien.
Carlos: Pedir algo...
Natalia: Pedir
Carlos: Perdir
Natalia: algo
Carlos: What did I say?
Natalia: Perdir. It’s pedir.
Carlos: Okay. Okay like pedir. Pedir algo a alguien.
Natalia: Uhoo.
Carlos: To ask somebody for something.
Natalia: Right or like in today’s conversation again, a pedir la mano de mi hija, mi orgullo.
Carlos: To ask for the hand of my daughter, my pride. So here it is about asking for hand in a marriage.
Natalia: The next word is a bit confusing.
Carlos: Which?
Natalia: Embarazo.
Carlos: Right. You know what, at first glance, you would think that it means embarrassing or embarrassed.
Natalia: Right but in actuality, this masculine noun means pregnant.
Carlos: And right now, it looks like Adolfo has found himself in the middle of un embarazo no deseado.
Natalia: You could say that this was an unplanned pregnancy.
Carlos: Well when Señor Fuentes asks ¿Cuál embarazo?
Natalia: What pregnancy?
Carlos: We know that Adolfo wasn’t the only one who was surprised.
Natalia: We have some related words too.
Carlos: Which are?
Natalia: There is the verb embarazar and the adjective embarazada. Again not to be confused, preñada is only used for animals.
Carlos: Wouldn’t think of mixing that up. Okay grammar point.
LESSON FOCUS
Natalia: Here we are getting into that slippery slope of verb conjugation.
Carlos: Why do you say that?
Natalia: Because the present tense is usually the first thing that students learn.
Carlos: Understandably okay.
Natalia: But then they get confused with other tenses.
Carlos: Yeah it’s a little daunting.
Natalia: Well as promised today, we are going to learn how to form and use the preterit tense of the indicative mood.
Carlos: Natie, I am all yours.
Natalia: In today’s conversation, we heard ¡Qué bien que tomó tan bien la noticia del embarazo!
Carlos: Right. You took the news about the pregnancy really well.
Natalia: Which verb do you use here?
Carlos: Tomar. To take.
Natalia: Right. Here tomó is the preterit tense.
Carlos: Okay so, qué bien que tomo tan bien la noticia del embarazo
Natalia: tomó
Carlos: Okay so, qué bien que tomó tan bien la noticia del embarazo
Natalia: Uhoo…
Carlos: Right. You took the news about the pregnancy really well.
Natalia: Exactly. The preterit tense expresses an action prior to the present or to another action.
Carlos: So like I saw him two days ago or I spoke with her while you are working.
Natalia: Exactly. You completed the action prior to right now.
Carlos: So how do we form the preterit tense?
Natalia: To form the preterit tense for regular verbs, we first must remove the ar, er or ir ending to get the root of the word and then we add one of the correct preterit endings.
Carlos: Which are?
Natalia: Well let’s take our example tomar, to take and conjugated in fully to the preterit tense. Do you remember er endings?
Carlos: Yeah I think so. I have them somewhere.
Natalia: Okay then conjugate.
Carlos: Okay. Yo tomé.
Natalia: I took.
Carlos: Tú tomaste.
Natalia: Tú tomaste.
Carlos: Tú tomaste.
Natalia: You took.
Carlos: Él tomó.
Natalia: He took.
Carlos: Ella tomó.
Natalia: She took.
Carlos: Usted tomó.
Natalia: You took formal, good. Now the plural.
Carlos: Okay let’s see. Nosotros tomamos.
Natalia: We took
Carlos: Vosotros tomasteis.
Natalia: You all took.
Carlos: Ellos tomaron.
Natalia: They took masculine.
Carlos: Ellas tomaron.
Natalia: They took feminine.
Carlos: Ustedes tomaron.
Natalia: You all took formal. So you see from the example once again. Qué bien que tomó tan bien la noticia del embarazo
Carlos: You took the news about the pregnancy really well.
Natalia: So there was an example of a first conjugation ar verb tomar, conjugated in the preterit tense of the indicative mood.
Carlos: Nice that we did.
Natalia: But Carlos, I have a surprise for our audience.
Carlos: What’s that?
Natalia: You might know this already actually.
Carlos: Okay what is it?
Natalia: Let me post a question. What do the preterit endings for all er and ir verbs have in common?
Carlos: Ah you know what, I do know this. The preterit endings for all regular er and ir verbs are identical.
Natalia: So now you know what we are going to do.
Carlos: Let me guess. Conjugate two more verbs.
Natalia: Exactly. Let’s do aprender.
Carlos: To learn.
Natalia: And decidir.
Carlos: To decide.
Natalia: Ready when you are Carlos.
Carlos: Oh I am doing it. Yo aprendí. I learned right?
Natalia: Yes.
Carlos: Okay. Tú aprendiste.
Natalia: You learned.
Carlos: Él aprendio.
Natalia: aprendió
Carlos: Él aprendió.
Natalia: He learned.
Carlos: Ella aprendió.
Natalia: She learned.
Carlos: Usted aprendió.
Natalia: You learned formal.
Carlos: Nosotros aprendimos.
Natalia: We learned.
Carlos: Vosotros aprendisteis
Natalia: You all learned informal.
Carlos: Ellos/ellas/ustedes aprendieron.
Natalia: They learned masculine/feminine. You all learned formal.
Carlos: And Natie, you know what. I know you have some examples.
Natalia: Aprendisteis a tomar el metro hace tiempo.
Carlos: You all learned to take the subway a while back.
Natalia: Y tú hijito, ¿de quién aprendió esas vulgaridades?
Carlos: I knew little boy. Where did you learn all those expertise? Okay now you ask for decidir.
Natalia: That I did.
Carlos: Yo decidí.
Natalia: I decided.
Carlos: Tú decidiste.
Natalia: You decided informal.
Carlos: Él/Ella/Usted decidio.
Natalia: decidió
Carlos: Él/Ella/Usted decidió.
Natalia: He, she, you decided formal.
Carlos: Nosotros decidimos.
Natalia: We decided
Carlos: Vosotros decidisteis
Natalia: You all decided informal.
Carlos: Ellos/Ellas/Ustedes decidieron.
Natalia: They decided masculine/feminine formal.
Carlos: Good. I did it. Now you do some examples.
Natalia: DEcidieron ir a playa a pesar de las inclemencias del tiempo.
Carlos: They decided to go to the beach despite the inclement weather.
Natalia: ¿Cuándo decidiste mudarte a Costa Rica?
Carlos: Why did you decide to move to Costa Rica?
Natalia: Listen, for regular ar and ir verbs, the present indicative and preterit indicative forms are identical. For example, terminamos el trabajo ayer. We finished the job yesterday or terminamos el trabajo a las seis de la tarde. We finished the job at 6 in the evening.
Carlos: Okay.
Natalia: As you can see in these examples, the sensing which we are to take, the verbal form depends on the context in which it is used. Er verbs on the other hand do not follow this rule.
Carlos: Natie, I will make sure I will keep that in mind.
Natalia: I am sure you have any questions Carlos, there will be a comment.
OUTRO
Carlos: And we will be there to answer. That just about does it for today. Okay some of our listeners already know about the most powerful tool on spanishpod101.com
Natalia: Line by line audio
Carlos: The perfect tool for rapidly improving listening comprehension.
Natalia: By listening to lines of the conversation again and again and again.
Carlos: Listen until every word and syllable becomes clear. Basically we break down the dialogue into comprehensible bite size sentences.
Natalia: You can try the line by line audio in the premium learning center at spanishpod101.com
Carlos: All right we are done. Nos vamos, right?
Natalia: Nos vemos.
Carlos: ¡Nos vemos!
Natalia: ¡No se pierdan ya nos vemos!
Carlos: Ya nos vemos.

Grammar

Spanish Grammar Made Easy - Unlock This Lesson’s Grammar Guide

Easily master this lesson’s grammar points with in-depth explanations and examples. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Dialog - Bilingual

Vocabulary

10 Comments

Hide
Please to leave a comment.
😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍
Sorry, please keep your comment under 800 characters. Got a complicated question? Try asking your teacher using My Teacher Messenger.
Sorry, please keep your comment under 800 characters.

SpanishPod101.com
Monday at 6:30 pm
Pinned Comment
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Thanks to Herman Pearl for the music in today's lesson. I know I've put my foot in my mouth plenty of times but never to this magnitude! When was the last time you did?

SpanishPod101.comVerified
Sunday at 1:51 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hola Frank,


Thank you for your comment.

We can review the following lesson about POR vs. PARA.

https://www.spanishpod101.com/lesson/absolute-beginner-questions-answered-by-rosa-6-when-to-use-por-and-para/

Practiquemos!


Saludos,

Carla

Team SpanishPod101.com

Frank R Timmons
Wednesday at 5:54 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Gracias para una lección útil. No estoy seguro qué entendi el español por (¿o para?) awhile back. ¿Nati dijo hace tiempo o otra cosa? Gracias otra vez. Frank

Carlos
Thursday at 10:04 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hey Rodney!

No worries. I am not saying that we are going to make any changes. You have valid points. The issue just came up because we have gotten some negative reviews about the speed with which Nati speaks. I like your point about vocabulary and grammar getting all the glory, training your ear is really really important and is not given the attention it deserves. Your opinion is valuable to us...that is what these comments are for! As always, thank you for the feedback!

Rodney Prince
Wednesday at 5:49 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

I'm no longer a beginner, so my opinion may be somewhat skewed now. But after having had many conversations in Spanish with lots of people from lots of places, who all talk at different speeds, I think slowing the Spanish down is the wrong thing to do.


Now I fully agree that having things slowed down a bit helps a lot, but the lessons already do that. We hear the conversation at regular speed, and we hear it slowed way down, and we hear a translation. The way things work now allow you not only learn grammar and vocabulary, but you can also train your ears - your ability to distinguish each and every word, which is something some of us may overlook, especially as beginners. And if you plan on actually using your Spanish with real people, this is a skill best developed from the beginning.


Now, Having said all that, even I think Nati does speak pretty fast. But this is how I train my ears, as I mentioned above. I listen to it normal speed, then I listen to the slowed down version and read the transcript if necessary, until I can hear each individual word as she speaks it at regular speed. This is how you're gonna learn to be able to decipher what people say. It will also help you deal with the fact that at times you simply aren't going to understand everything someone says and have to piece together the message from the few words you did understand. Yet another skill that needs to be developed from the beginning.


In terms of learning Spanish, the vocabulary and grammar get all the glory, but developing your listening skills and being able to get the "gist" of things are going to have a huge impact on your ability to successfully communicate in Spanish.


Anyway, I've blown enough hot air for now. My opinion is leave things as they are. But hey, I'm just one little fish in a big pond.

Carlos
Wednesday at 3:15 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Rodney,

Thanks for the feedback. I agree with you but also think that in terms of learning, a slower pronunciation would be helpful at times. But you are right, the transcript helps matters. Nati does speak quite quickly and it is difficult to understand for some. I guess it all depends on your personal learning style. What do you think?

Rodney Prince
Tuesday at 10:24 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

In regards to Natalia, I don't think she should slow down her speech at all. She should speak naturally, the way she would to any other Spanish speaking person.


To me, it's important that she does, because that is how people are going to speak to you in real life. What she says is already repeated in the dialog at a slow pace during the translation, so you can catch what she says there. And if that's still not slow enough, you do have the transcript to read.


Nati does speak fast, but our goal is to learn Spanish as it is spoken by real people. Figuring out what Nati says should be considered a chance to practice your listening and comprehension skills. If you plan on using your Spanish with real people, this is a very important skill you'll need to develop as well.

Ajay Saha
Tuesday at 10:57 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Kindly give the option to play this audio link either in Real Player, Flash Player as well as in Window Media Plaer as because sometimes I cnnot open the audio link due to its limiations to be played only in one particular media player


.While the conversation going on, If possible its Spanish Transcript should be automatically get opened at the time of it AUDIO PLAY just below it so that if one could not undestand even a single word then one can see it written transcript just below then and there without waiting or even a single minutes please.


The audio Speaker need to be bit more slow and at the same time much CLEAR too please


Thanks

Regards

AjaySaha

New Delhi

India

Carlos
Wednesday at 2:22 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hey Phylis!

No problem...I will mention that to Natalia. It is something that has come up more than once...If you need anything she said clarified please don't hesitate to ask.


Carlos

phylis Collier
Tuesday at 12:40 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Since Carlos brought up Natalia speaking too fast, I will second it. I find that although

she always says the individual words nice and slow, when she gives the por ejemplo in a sentence

it always just needs to be a drop slower. It might be just my bad ear, but it would make it so much easier for me to repeat the phrase and learn it etc. How about it, just a drop slower?