Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Natalia: Buenos días, soy Natalia.
Carlos: What’s going on? My name is Carlos.
Natalia: Newbie series, season 2, Lesson #14.
Carlos: Credit or cash.
Natalia: Hola!
Carlos: What’s going on? How are you doing Natie?
Natalia: I am good.
Carlos: I am very good as well.
Natalia: I have a question for you.
Carlos: Shoot.
Natalia: Are you concerned over your economy?
Carlos: What? You mean, the US economy, yeah but not really.
Natalia: Why not Carlos?
Carlos: Well just a little wrap up since you know. At the time this lesson is recorded, congress had just rejected its $7 billion bail out but it passed in the senate yesterday.
Natalia: They passed it. I know, that’s what I am talking about.
Carlos: Look at your own current events.
Natalia: Hello, I watch CNN all the time. So don’t bug me and I watch CNN and I watch the lady that is Nancy something that she is…
Carlos: Nancy something.
Natalia: What’s her name? I don’t remember.
Carlos: I don’t watch CNN. I don’t know. Yeah…Okay.
Natalia: You should see the look in his eyes.
Carlos: Yeah. My eyes are glazed over a lot.
Natalia: All right.
Carlos: Okay Natie remember, people could be listening to this in years to come.
Natalia: That’s true. If by then you will hear these lessons, poor Carlos and me are under a bridge starving. Please remember.
Carlos: Speak for yourself. Live under a bridge, Nats. I will to be quite all right. All right, most of my friends here I left at the right time because you know what, the American economy affects us down here too.
Natalia: I know. The funny thing is that when in the states, there is a problem, it affects here like a couple of weeks later. You know, it just we are linked.
Carlos: You know what Natie, I am usually the one that goes on serious tangents.
Natalia: Carlos, I was counting on that.
Carlos: My gosh! You manipulated me. Why?
Natalia: We are talking about monetary issues.
Carlos: Okay. Now it makes sense but wait, what does that mean?
Natalia: Well someone is going to count till 100 and it’s not going to be me. Hahaha!
Carlos: Cheeky.
Natalia: No.
Carlos: Oh!
Natalia: Well you know, without fundamentals, one cannot advance.
Carlos: You sound like a sensei.
Natalia: When it comes to you learning Spanish, consider me one.
Carlos: Uh Sensei!
Natalia: Oh my gosh!
Carlos: Listeners, you heard her. We are now going to go into the today’s conversation.
Natalia: Now will be the time to open up your lesson right on your PDF reader.
DIALOGUE
ANA: El total es sesenta soles con noventa y cinco centavos. ¿Crédito o efectivo?
JORGE: Efectivo no más. Tome.
ANA: Sesenta y cinco…gracias… ¿Desea, usted, hacer una contribución de cinco centavos?
JORGE: ¿Y para qué?
ANA: Para el proyecto rescate niños de la calle.
JORGE: Ah, bueno, sí. Para eso, sí.
ANA: Su vuelto, señor, cuatro soles. Que le vaya bien.
Carlos: And now slowly. Una vez más esta vez lentamente.
ANA: El total es sesenta soles con noventa y cinco centavos. ¿Crédito o efectivo?
JORGE: Efectivo no más. Tome.
ANA: Sesenta y cinco…gracias… ¿Desea, usted, hacer una contribución de cinco centavos?
JORGE: ¿Y para qué?
ANA: Para el proyecto rescate niños de la calle.
JORGE: Ah, bueno, sí. Para eso, sí.
ANA: Su vuelto, señor, cuatro soles. Que le vaya bien.
Carlos: And now with the translation. Ahora incluiremos la traducción.
ANA: El total es sesenta soles con noventa y cinco centavos. ¿Crédito o efectivo?
ANA: The total is sixty soles and ninety-five cents. Credit or cash?
JORGE: Efectivo no más. Tome.
JORGE: Just cash. Here you go
ANA: Sesenta y cinco…gracias… ¿Desea, usted, hacer una contribución de cinco centavos?
ANA: Sixty five... thank you... Would you like to make a contribution of five cents?
JORGE: ¿Y para qué?
JORGE: What for?
ANA: Para el proyecto rescate niños de la calle.
ANA: For the project 'get our kids off the street'.
JORGE: Ah, bueno, sí. Para eso, sí.
JORGE: Ah, well, OK. For that, sure.
ANA: Su vuelto, señor, cuatro soles. Que le vaya bien.
ANA: Your change, Sir, four soles. Have a good one.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Carlos: I don’t know. I give my change for that.
Natalia: Yeah. Here you know surely they have like a little boxes in the supermarkets to help on different foundations.
Carlos: What I don’t understand is I have to tip no matter where I park. I got to give 300 colones to somebody.
Natalia: Carlos?
Carlos: What?
Natalia: What does this has to do with the conversation?
Carlos: Monetary issues, they are asking me to donate something. I don’t know if – are they employed or something.
Natalia: Oy you are so dumb. Of course, they charge you 200 colones because they are checking your car and taking care that nobody messes with your car.
Carlos: But I saw a guy with one leg and crutches. Who is he going to stop from stealing my car? I mean really.
Natalia: Carlos.
Carlos: I am just saying.
Natalia: 300 colones is less than a dollar.
Carlos: I know it’s less than a dollar.
Natalia: You have to know.
Carlos: I am just saying every single point that I…
Natalia: So what Carlos is saying, economy is so bad. You shouldn’t give your money to a one-legged person. What is this man? Oh my god!
Carlos: I didn’t say that. I am just….
Natalia: What a cruel human being. Now let’s go to vocabulary. Oh my god!
VOCAB LIST
Carlos: I guess I am going to man! She is about to hit me again. Well you know what, now will be the time to move to the vocabulary section on today’s PDF lesson guide and now we are going to start off with a masculine noun.
Natalia: crédito
Carlos: Credit.
Natalia: cré-di-to, crédito
Carlos: And then we have a masculine noun.
Natalia: efectivo
Carlos: Cash.
Natalia: e-fec-ti-vo, efectivo
Carlos: Now we have a feminine noun.
Natalia: contribución
Carlos: Contribution.
Natalia: con-tri-bu-ción, contribución
Carlos: Now we have a masculine noun.
Natalia: proyecto
Carlos: Project.
Natalia: pro-yec-to, proyecto
Carlos: And then we have another masculine noun.
Natalia: rescate
Carlos: Rescue.
Natalia: res-ca-te, rescate
Carlos: And last but not least, another masculine noun.
Natalia: vuelto
Carlos: Change.
Natalia: vuel-to, vuelto
Carlos: Okay.
Natalia: Carlos, I want you to say contribución.
Carlos: Contribución
Natalia: Con-tri-bu-ción
Carlos: Con-tri-bu-ción
Natalia: Yeay! Say it normal.
Carlos: Contribución
Natalia: Yay! Proyecto, efectivo, crédito, vuelto
Carlos: Crédito, efectivo, proyecto, rescate, vuelto.
Natalia: Ai que bonito!
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Carlos: Okay now time to show our audience as well as myself how to use these vocabulary words. Our first word is one that confused me.
Natalia: Efectivo.
Carlos: Yeah efectivo. I mean when someone asked me for that, I thought they were asking me if I was being effective.
Natalia: Carlos, for our audience, efectivo means cash.
Carlos: Cash, money flow.
Natalia: God, stop this man please!
Carlos: Loot Natie loot!
Natalia: I swear I’ll smack you, Carlos. Oh my God! Other times, the word efectivo is used as an adjective.
Carlos: Wait! So it can’t be ineffective.
Natalia: I never disagreed with you.
Carlos: No you didn’t but how about an example.
Natalia: Por ejemplo, podría decir “No tengo efectivo pues pagaré con credito.” I don’t have cash. So I will pay with credit.
Carlos: Natie hates credit.
Natalia: Lo detesto.
Carlos: Okay no actually she loves credit and thus hates it.
Natalia: I don’t have a credit card. I don’t see what’s wrong with that.
Carlos: Why not Natie?
Natalia: Because I like to spend what I have. Not pay for stuff later.
Carlos: Okay.
Natalia: Yeah I mean, I mean again the comments are wide open. Please let me know if I am stupid or if I am actually quite smart.
Carlos: I am not going to give any more background on that because all right well you know what Nat, are there any slang terms for money or cash in Costa Rica. I mean, I know in Mexico, they say lana, wool for dinero, and in Peru, they say plata, silver.
Natalia: Yeah here we say plata.
Carlos: Plata.
Natalia: Si.
Carlos: I have also heard like colors like rojo.
Natalia: Ah bueno. That is for example you know the 1000 colones bills are red. So they say un rojo or the 5000 colones bill has a tucán on it. So they say un tucán.
Carlos: So that’s what they mean. Okay.
Natalia: Un rojo, u--
Carlos: I thought someone was asking for either a bird or Fruit Loop.
Natalia: Let’s say 40000 colones. 40000 colones.
Carlos: Yeah.
Natalia: Cuatro rojos.
Carlos: Okay. Nice, that’s what they mean. Okay next word, contribución.
Natalia: Contribución. Well this is a feminine noun that means contribution in this lesson in the sense of the donation.
Carlos: Wait! Is it associated with a verb?
Natalia: Yes the verb contribuir which Carlos never does. No, no, no I am not getting over that Carlos. I am not getting over that.
Carlos: For what?
Natalia: You should go look for that poor man and give him more money.
Carlos: What the one-legged dude, I did give him money.
Natalia: 300 Colones. What are you going to do with your 300 colones? You see how the economy is?
Carlos: Yeah. You will know that I have a big – big bed in my house that I collect little coins in.
Natalia: Carlos, why don’t you pronounce contribuir?
Carlos: Contribuir.
Natalia: Contribuir. Okay.
Carlos: Aaha!
Natalia: Ai Carlos.
Carlos: Thank you Natie but how about an example?
Natalia: Bueno vamos a ver. Por ejemplo: ¿Desea usted hacer una contribución? Would you like to make a contribution?
Carlos: So like for a cause.
Natalia: Yes like in the conversation, that’s pretty much it.
Carlos: Okay next up proyecto. That can be figured out.
Natalia: Proyecto. This is the masculine noun that means...
Carlos: Project.
Natalia: Oh Carlos, I am so proud.
Carlos: Are you? Good because I think you just spelled it out.
Natalia: Well in Spanish, it’s spelled p-r-o-y-e-c-t-o. Now-a-days that this is the letter y that can be pronounced two different ways.
Carlos: Which is why I mentioned the spelling.
Natalia: I tend to pronounce it like the sh sound of she. Proyecto.
Carlos: Proyecto.
Natalia: Yeah you can hear it like that in other…
Carlos: Sounds like Italian.
Natalia: Proyecto. Te vas del proyecto.
Carlos: Okay I know this has a verb.
Natalia: This noun comes from the verb proyectar which means to project.
Carlos: Like
Natalia: Por ejemplo, acabo de empezar un nuevo proyecto. I have just begun a new project.
Carlos: Natie, you always start new projects.
Natalia: I know. Well you know, that was an example.
Carlos: Okay, rescate.
Natalia: Rescate.
Carlos: Rescate.
Natalia: Uhoo…
Carlos: I got this one. This masculine noun means rescue.
Natalia: And the verb
Carlos: It comes from the verb rescatar which means to rescue.
Natalia: Do you have an example?
Carlos: Yeah something I saw in the news.
Natalia: Shoot.
Carlos: El rescate duró cuatro horas.
Natalia: Aaha.
Carlos: The rescue took four hours.
Natalia: So you just changed things up.
Carlos: Are you saying that because our next noun, it means change.
Natalia: Well vuelto does means change but not like cambiar.
Carlos: No?
Natalia: This masculine noun means change as in the money you receive back after you’ve paid for something. It’s identical with the past participle of the verb volver which means to return and this makes sense after you pay for something, your change is what you get back is what is returned to you.
Carlos: So me saying, necesito cambiar is wrong?
Natalia: But now you can say, necesito cambiar este billete. I need to change this bill you know for a smaller quantity.
Carlos: Okay but what about if I just need change?
Natalia: If you need change, exactly you can go and say, tell somebody at--
Carlos: No, but when you pay for something?
Natalia: Yeah but Carlos, for example, you are going to buy a burger and because you need the change. So you go and say, ¿Me puede cambiar este billete?
Carlos: Umm Hamburger.
Natalia: Ai! See he is not even paying attention. Oyii…
LESSON FOCUS
Carlos: Are we really studying numbers again Natie?
Natalia: You could not count to 100 in Spanish if your life depended on it.
Carlos: And I thought you learned your lesson with 1 through 50. I guess the hardheaded have to feel it to believe it.
Natalia: How about you count?
Carlos: Okay. Cincuenta, cincuenta y uno, cincuenta y dos, cincuenta y tres, cincuenta y cuatro, cincuenta y cinco, cincuenta y seis, cincuenta y siete, cincuenta y ocho, cincuenta y nueve, sesenta. Now you do it.
Natalia: Cincuenta, cincuenta y uno, cincuenta y dos, cincuenta y tres, cincuenta y cuatro, cincuenta y cinco, cincuenta y seis, cincuenta y siete, cincuenta y ocho, cincuenta y nueve, sesenta.
Carlos: Good how about an example using number 50 then Natie?
Natalia: Te llame cincuenta veces pero nunca contestaste. I called you 50 times but you never answered.
Carlos: I was probably sleeping.
Natalia: Carlos, you would think you would just turn your phone off. The man sees my number in his phone and he just tosses it.
Carlos: Good point. You know what, I will keep that in mind.
Natalia: Okay next group.
Carlos: 60 to 70 okay. Sesenta y uno, sesenta y dos, sesenta y tres, sesenta y cuatro, sesenta y cinco, sesenta y seis, sesenta y siete, sesenta y ocho, sesenta y nueve, setenta.
Natalia: Sesenta, sesenta y uno, sesenta y dos, sesenta y tres, sesenta y cuatro, sesenta y cinco, sesenta y seis, sesenta y siete, sesenta y ocho, sesenta y nueve, setenta.
Carlos: Good. Now an example.
Natalia: Después de sesenta dias tendre que renovar mi visa. After 60 days, I will have to renew my visa.
Carlos: Something I would have to say.
Natalia: When do you have to leave again?
Carlos: Soon. Very soon actually.
Natalia: Hehehe. Next group Carlos. 70 to 80
Carlos: Setenta, setenta y uno, setenta y dos, setenta y tres, sesenta y cuatro, sesenta y cinco, setenta y seis, setenta y siete, setenta y ocho, setenta y nueve, ochenta. You do it now.
Natalia: Setenta, setenta y uno, setenta y dos, setenta y tres, sesenta y cuatro, sesenta y cinco, setenta y seis, setenta y siete, setenta y ocho, setenta y nueve, ochenta.
Carlos: You know one group deserves an example.
Natalia: Okay. Mi abuelito ya tiene setenta y cuatro años. My grandpa is now 74 years old.
Carlos: Man, I bet he has seen Costa Rica change.
Natalia: Anyone who lived the 80s has seen Costa Rica change. It was before the gringo invasion.
Carlos: That’s right, that’s right. We have changed things up.
Natalia: Carlos, next group.
Carlos: That would be 80 through 90. Ochenta, ochenta y uno, ochenta y dos, ochenta y tres, ochenta y cuatro, ochenta y cinco, ochenta y seis, ochenta y siete, ochenta y ocho, ochenta y nueve, noventa.
Natalia: But the funny thing is though
Carlos: What’s the funny thing Natie?
Natalia: The smoke is coming up your head.
Carlos: Yeah that’s because you are bothering me.
Natalia: Ochenta, ochenta y uno, ochenta y dos, ochenta y tres, ochenta y cuatro, ochenta y cinco, ochenta y seis, ochenta y siete, ochenta y ocho, ochenta y nueve, noventa. Apuesto ochenta dolares que no sabes contar en castellano.
Carlos: Wait, wait, wait, I bet you $80 that you don’t know how to count in Spanish.
Natalia: Just an example.
Carlos: If I win, I want dollars and not colones.
Natalia: Well given the way your economy looks, you might prefer colones.
Carlos: Okay you didn’t have to ask 90 to 100. Noventa, noventa y uno, noventa y dos, noventa y tres, noventa y cuatro, noventa y cinco, noventa y seis, noventa y siete, noventa y ocho, noventa y nueve, cien.
Natalia: Ey…. Noventa, noventa y uno, noventa y dos, noventa y tres, noventa y cuatro, noventa y cinco, noventa y seis, noventa y siete, noventa y ocho, noventa y nueve, cien. Carlos, cuando tenga noventa y nueve años me gustaría ser parapente. When I am 99 years old, I’d like to go parasailing.
Carlos: Audience, trust me, I can see that.
Natalia: I would love to do that if I am going to be a cool woman but I don’t know if I make it.
Carlos: Give me another example Natie.
Natalia: Este ejemplo te va a costar cien dolares.
Carlos: This example is going to cost you $100. Wait! Wait! Wait! I just want 80. How did I get in the hole by $20?
Natalia: Homework.
Carlos: Where is your diabolic laugh?
Natalia: All right. It’s time for today's tarea. In today’s grammar section, we covered cardinal numbers from 60 to 100. Now I am going to give five phrases in English each of which includes a number. What you have to do is translate this phrase to Spanish using the correct Spanish number. Are you ready? Number one: Cincuenta y tres días. Number two: Sesenta y cinco minutos. Number three: Setenta y siete estudiantes. Number four: ochenta y dos veces. Number five: Noventa y ocho quejas.
OUTRO
Carlos: Now remember. You can always check out the answers with comments in the premium audio track label Tarea. Homework. Well listen up guys. This lesson as all of our lessons are designed to be used in tandem with the language tools in the premium learning center at spanishpod101.com
Natalia: And if you don’t already have a premium membership, you can sign up for a free seven day trial and see what it’s all about. Say goodbye in Spanish now.
Carlos: Adios.
Natalia: No Carlos!
Carlos: ¡Hasta luego!
Natalia: Carlos.
Carlos: Chao!
Natalia: Carlos, Carlos, say
Carlos: Everybody here says chao.
Natalia: I don’t care but they are already using your Spanish. Say something nice like bueno es hora de irnos, hasta luego a todos los que nos escuchan.
Carlos: Yes exactly that. She mumbles it.
Natalia: I don’t know. I am just giving examples out. Go, go, go….
Carlos: Bueno, chao.
Natalia: That is such a big cool sentence.
Carlos: Thank you Natie. I will try.
Natalia: Next lesson, I want you to have something ready Carlos.
Carlos: Now I have homework.
Natalia: Oh my god! Bueno, chao entonces.
Carlos: See why can you say it?
Natalia: Because I already know Spanish man.

Grammar

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Dialog - Bilingual

Tarea

Vocabulary

9 Comments

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SpanishPod101.com
Monday at 6:30 pm
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Thanks to Herman Pearl for the music in today’s lesson. The pronunciation of numbers can be misleading. Has anyone checked out the premium audio?

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SpanishPod101.com
Tuesday at 4:38 pm
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Hi Mary,


Thank you for your feedback.

We appreciate it and we'll take it into consideration for improving our site.


Keep up the good work with Spanish!


Sincerely,

Ofelia

Team SpanishPod101.com

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Mary
Sunday at 8:59 am
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I am finding spanish pod 101 to be a good tool for learning Spanish. I like listening to the dialogues in particular so I can get experience hearing the Spanish Language. That being said, I have to second John's comment below that the political discourse is out of place in this lesson. I fast-forwarded through most of it to be honest. And it is kind of dating the recordings now.


But, It inspired me to finally comment on something that has been bugging me a bit with Newbie season 2, so here goes - in my opinion, there is a bit too much off topic banter in these lessons. I like the personalities of Natalie and Carlos and I agree some banter helps the lessons be not too dry and helps you get to know the people as personalities, but they spend quite a bit of time teasing each other in a way that doesn't add to the lesson and is just kind of silly. I find my attention drifting when they go off subject and sometimes it goes on so long I forward past it and may be missing some of the grammar points, which is what I paid for as a premium member after all. I think the newbie season one also had banter (and sometimes impromptu singing) but it usually touched on something culturally relevant that helped me recall the lesson content. Just some constructive criticism - again overall the experience has been positive with 101.

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SpanishPod101.com
Saturday at 2:01 pm
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Hola John,


Thank you for your constructive feedback, we will consider it for future lessons.

We are really happy and proud about your accomplishment, keep practicing!


Suerte,

Carla

Team SpanishPod101.com

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John
Tuesday at 10:18 pm
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- In preface, please know that I love spanishpod101 very much and love all the teachers.

- I did not appreciate the first three minutes of political discussion on USA economics and republicans. I'm on spanishpod101 to learn Spanish. I love the inbetween jokes, and that is needed, but wow on the first 3:00 duration of political discussion - too much for the purpose of this paid for service in my opinion.

- As I started with a positive comment, I also will end with one. I apologize for any negative commenting, but I do think it helps the company to hear what premium members (i.e. me) feel about things - AND - this lesson is inspiring me to be able to go to a supermarket one day and completely speak in Spanish to the check out person.

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Tom
Tuesday at 9:43 am
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It looks like the Lesson Notes are messed up for this lesson. Asking for a Japanese language pack.

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Natalia
Thursday at 3:53 am
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Thank You Nathan! :mrgreen:



It's funny because I really don't plan on getting credit at all.. Carlos in the other hand every single time he sees me pay for something cash says " Naty you should get a credit card " ... I actually think he secretly works for a bank.


Nathan Thank you so much for following the lessons and for your comments feedback is VERY appreciated!


Que estes bien!


-Nat

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Nathan
Tuesday at 11:57 am
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This was a very good lesson for me. Thanks.


Natalia, I think you are very smart for not using credit.

If one is not careful, it can get out of control. Yes, I'm speaking from experience:-)


Thanks again,

Nathan

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Joeseph
Monday at 9:29 pm
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It's funny how numbers are the kinds of words that you're kind of embarrassed to learn, since this is a topic that we learn as kids in our native language; however, there are so many times when know them is crucial to a situation.


Nice lesson Carlos and Nati! It's good to have all of the fundamentals covered.


Best,

Joseph