Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

PROLOGUE
¡Bienvenidos!
¡Bienvenidos!
¡Bienvenidos!
¡Sean bienvenidos!
Transmitiendo desde Spanishpod101.com
¡Qué chiva que está!
¡Hola chicos!
¿Qué tal todo el mundo?
¿Qué onda todos?
Dylan: We’re doing something a little more, shall we say, practical here?
¡Vaya!
Me parece muy útil.
¡Pero será posible!
Más útil no puede ser.
Lógico.
a thousand times.
¡Qué dicha!
Lógico.
INTRODUCTION
Lizy: Muy buenos días, me llamo Lizy Stoliar.
Alan: Alan La Rue here. Introduction, Lesson #7 – “A living and breathing language.” Lizy and Alan, back again.
Lizy: Alan, ¿cómo estás?
Alan: I’m great, Lizy. Thanks. I’ve forgiven you for saying that I look like an iguana in the last lesson, like you don’t know that… How are you doing?
Lizy: I’m great and I’m glad to see that you can take a joke. Gracias por acompañarnos. We’re coming to you via podcast from Spanishpod101.com, an innovative and revolutionary way to master Spanish. This way you can study anytime and at your own place, anywhere.
Alan: Now, today’s lesson is an introduction to the Regional Spanish Series, the innovative way to learn how spoken Spanish differs from region to region. We can distinguish the forms of Spanish spoken in Spain from those in the America’s, but these form in the America’s are also rich, unique and vibrant.
Lizy: It’s an interesting thing when we, native speakers, talk with someone from another country. We can almost always detect where they’re from.
Alan: This is really characteristic of Spanish. Now, you might be asking yourself “How am I supposed to learn regional forms of Spanish if I don’t already have the basics?” Well, the thing is that this series puts you in contact with real life examples comparing the standard forms to the regional forms, lets us see how the language can be used.
Lizy: And you may be surprised to see on which points regional forms of speech converge and on which points they split of.
Alan: That’s right. While most Spanish language courses intend to teach you Spanish with a capital S, with Spanishpod101 recognize that in a sense every form of Spanish is regional. In this series, we highlight regional differences and add breath to our study of grammar topics, making Spanishpod101 the most comprehensive option to learn Spanish online.
Lizy: We also learn a whole load about the customs and culture of these countries, as well.
Alan: So, today we’re going to do something that we don’t do very often. We’re going to compare a Newbie Lesson, Lesson #10, with three different regional conversations: Peruvian #10, Iberian #10 and Costa Rican #10. In our Regional Series this comparison is only ever made with the standard version and one region. But we want to give you a full sampler platter of spoken Spanish. So, we’ll start up by listening to those conversations in Spanish, and then we’ll hear them again with an English translation. After that, we’ll take a second and draw some distinctions, make some comparisons, and then after that we’ll talk about how a given region impacts the way in which people from that region speak.
Lizy: And, Alan, what’s the goal of the Regional Series?
Alan: The goal’s to learn how people actually speak Spanish, to learn synonyms, to taste the real flavor of the language and to remember it.
Lizy: So, Alan, let’s listen to some conversations.
Alan: Sounds good. Now the real trick to making the most of these lessons is to listen to the podcast and then stop by Spanishpod101.com. Remember, these lessons are designed to be used in tandem with the learning tools found in the premium Learning Center at Spanishpod101.com
Lizy: ¡Les invitamos una semana gratis!
Alan: All right. So, stop by and sign up for your free seven day trial. Before we begin, make the most out this medium and press the center button on your IPod and you’ll see the transcripts of today’s lesson conversation in the display. Okay. Should we jump in?
Lizy: ¡Vamos!
Alan: First, we have the conversation from Newbie, Lesson #10. There, Renzo and Lucía are starving, getting ready for some lunch. This is a standard version. And here is what we heard:
DIALOGUE - standard version
RENZO: ¡Lucía, me muero de hambre!
LUCÍA: Yo también tengo mucha hambre, Renzo.
RENZO: ¿Qué quieres comer tú?
LUCÍA: Yo quiero comer carne.
REZNO: Con la carne quiero tomar un vino tinto.
LUCÍA: Yo tengo un Malbec.
Alan: And now, with the translation.
Lizy: Ahora incluiremos la traducción.
RENZO: ¡Lucía, me muero de hambre!
Alan: “Lucia, I’m starving.”
LUCÍA: Yo también tengo mucha hambre, Renzo.
Lizy: “I’m really hungry, too, Renzo.”
RENZO: ¿Qué quieres comer tú?
Alan: “What do you want to eat?”
LUCÍA: Yo quiero comer carne.
Lizy: “I want to eat meat.”
REZNO: Con la carne quiero tomar un vino tinto.
Alan: “With the meat I want to drink red wine.”
LUCÍA: Yo tengo un Malbec.
Lizy: “I have a Malbec.”
Alan: Okay. Now, let’s move on and hear what this conversation might sound like in Lima, Perú.
DIALOGUE - Peruvian version
LUIS: ¡Gabi, me muero de hambre!
GABRIELA: Bueno, Luchito, ya somos dos.
LUIS: ¿Qué te provoca?
GABRIELA: Me provoca un tiradito de lenguado.
LUIS: ¡Qué rico! ¡Lenguado! ¡Es buenazo! ¿Lo acompañamos con una Inka Kola?
GABRIELA: ¡Claro, la Inka Kola con todo combina!
Alan: And now, with the translation.
Lizy: Ahora incluiremos la traducción.
LUIS: ¡Gabi, me muero de hambre!
Alan: “Gaby, I’m starving.”
GABRIELA: Bueno, Luchito, ya somos dos.
Lizy: “Well, Lucito, that makes two of us.’
LUIS: ¿Qué te provoca?
Alan: “What are you in the mood for?”
GABRIELA: Me provoca un tiradito de lenguado.
Lizy: “I’m in the mood for toast flander.”
LUIS: ¡Qué rico! ¡Lenguado! ¡Es buenazo! ¿Lo acompañamos con una Inka Kola?
Alan: “How delicious. Flander it’s great. Should we have an Inka Cola with it?”
GABRIELA: ¡Claro, la Inka Kola con todo combina!
Lizy: “Of course. Inka Cola goes with everything.”
Alan: And now we’ll take a look at how this could sound in the Iberian Spanish of Madrid, Spain.
DIALOGUE - Iberian version
MEGAN: David, ya no puedo más, me muero de hambre.
DAVID: Ya te digo. Yo voy a pedir la fabada, ¿y tú?
MEGAN: A mí me apetece el besugo. Aquí está buenísimo.
DAVID: ¿Y pa' beber? ¿Pedimos una botella?
MEGAN: Sí, ¿qué tal un vino blanco? ¿Un albariño, por ejemplo?
DAVID: Perfecto.
Alan: And now, with the translation.
Lizy: Ahora incluiremos la traducción.
MEGAN: David, ya no puedo más, me muero de hambre.
Lizy: “David, I can’t take it anymore. I’m starving.”
DAVID: Ya te digo. Yo voy a pedir la fabada, ¿y tú?
Alan: “Don’t I know it. I’m going to order the fabada. How about you?”
MEGAN: A mí me apetece el besugo. Aquí está buenísimo.
Lizy: “I feel like having the sea bream. It’s delicious here.”
DAVID: ¿Y pa' beber? ¿Pedimos una botella?
Alan: “And to drink? Should we share a bottle?”
MEGAN: Sí, ¿qué tal un vino blanco? ¿Un albariño, por ejemplo?
Lizy: “Yes. How about a white wine an albariño?”
DAVID: Perfecto.
Alan: “Perfect.” And finally, we’ll hear this conversation as you’d hear it in San José, Costa Rica.
DIALOGUE - Costa Rican version
HERNÁN: ¡Silvia, me palmo de hambre!
SILVIA: Bueno, Hernán, me estoy palmando igual.
HERNÁN: ¿Qué comemos?
SILVIA: ¡Quiero comerme un pinto!
HERNÁN: ¡Qué rico el gallo pinto! ¿Qué tal un pinto con natilla?
SILVIA: ¡Pero, claro! ¡Y no nos podemos olvidar el café!
Alan: And now, with the translation.
Lizy: Ahora incluiremos la traducción.
HERNÁN: ¡Silvia, me palmo de hambre!
Alan: “Silvia, I’m dying of hunger.”
SILVIA: Bueno, Hernán, me estoy palmando igual.
Lizy: “Well, Hernan, I’m dying, too.”
HERNÁN: ¿Qué comemos?
Alan: “What should we eat?”
SILVIA: ¡Quiero comerme un pinto!
Lizy: “I want to eat some pinto.”
HERNÁN: ¡Qué rico el gallo pinto! ¿Qué tal un pinto con natilla?
Alan: “Gallo pinto is so tasty. How about a pinto with natilla?”
SILVIA: ¡Pero, claro! ¡Y no nos podemos olvidar el café!
Lizy: “Of course. And we can’t forget the coffee.”
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Alan: Man, that really is something to hear all those regional forms next to each other, Lizy. Which one caught your attention?
Lizy: Me llamó la atención la Ibérica.
Alan: Lizy really liked the Spanish from Spain. I really noticed a big difference in the way that’s pronounced. Muy bien. Now, with these conversations in mind, let’s take a look at some of the similarities and some of the differences.
Lizy: This should be good. How should we approach this?
LESSON FOCUS
Alan: Well, in these lessons we find people expressing their hunger and thirst. They talk about what they’re in the mood to eat and drink. So, let’s start off with the standard Spanish from the Newbie conversation. There, Lucía says...
Lizy: “Yo quiero comer carne”. “I want to eat meat.”
Alan: This is a pretty clear statement, kind of flat, indirect.
Lizy: Right. It would be understood, but it sounds a little contrived.
Alan: Now, in the Peruvian conversation, this changed a bit. There, Gabriela says to Luis...
Lizy: “Me provoca un tiradito de lenguado”. “I’m in the mood for toast flander.”
Alan: We see that the verb “provocar” has been used, and this means “to provoke” or “to be in the mood for something”.
Lizy: Right. Like “Me provoca ver televisión”. “I’m in the mood to watch TV.”
Alan: So, with this comparison we’ve learned that we can say either “quiero comer”, “I want to eat” and “me provoca comer”, “I’m in the mood to eat.” Now, let’s continue this comparison and look at how this expression of hunger was rendered in Iberian Spanish. There, Megan says to David...
Lizy: “A mí me apetece el besugo. Aquí está buenísimo”. “I feel like having the sea bream. It’s delicious here.”
Alan: So, now we have the verb “apetecer” in the form “me apetece” which literally translated means “It appetites me”, but in Spain, this can be used to say “I feel like.”
Lizy: So, now we’ve learned “quiero comer” - “I want to eat”, “me provoca comer” - “I want to eat” and now “me apetece comer” - “I feel like eating.”
Alan: And in the Costa Rican version, Silvia says to Hernán...
Lizy: “¡Quiero comerme un pinto!”, “I want to eat some pinto.”
Alan: This is an interesting example, because it does not differ all that much from the standard version. And we’ve got to point this out. If you listen to the Costa Rican Series, it’s not like you won’t be able to use what you learned in other places. Though it may not be as common, in the same way if you listen to the Iberian Series, you could definitely come to Peru, use your Iberian Spanish, understand other people and be understood.
Lizy: Sin duda. Without a doubt.
Alan: So, what we like to do in the Regional Series is to recap the comparison we’ve just made: to express hunger and the desire to eat. In the standard version, we heard?
Lizy: “Yo quiero comer carne”. “I want to eat meat.”
Alan: In the Peruvian version...
Lizy: “Me provoca un tiradito de lenguado”. “I’m in the mood for toast flander.”
Alan: In the Iberian version...
Lizy: “A mí me apetece el besugo. Aquí está buenísimo”. “I feel like having the sea bream. It’s delicious here.”
Alan: And in the Costa Rican version...
Lizy: “¡Quiero comerme un pinto!”, “I want to eat some pinto.” So, these are the kind of things that we’ll be looking at in this part of each regional Spanish lesson.
Alan: Basically, with the Regional Series, we bring the Spanish speaking world to you, the listener, and we show you what allows a native Spanish speaker to associate a particular form of speech with a region. This final section of the Regional Series gives our regional hosts the opportunity to let us in on the customs and idiom sequences that only a native would know. Here’s what we get the insider’s perspective of regional culture and customs, and how these take the shape of localisms.
Lizy: Here, we approach language through culture. We feel that the more you know about what life is like in different parts of the Spanish speaking world, the better you’ll be able to understand certain idiomatic expressions and general attitudes.
Alan: Now, again, in a typical regional lesson, we’ll just be focusing on one particular region, but for this introduction to the Regional Spanish Series, we’re giving you a buffet of regional forms. So, let’s summarize. In Peruvian lesson #10, Beatriz and Joseph introduce us to the “tiradito de lenguado”.
Lizy: ¡Ay, qué rico!
Alan: That sounds delicious, doesn’t it? So you can see how they open the door to Peruvian culture. While at the same time, looking at how this occurs in the language as well. Moving on with this comparison, in Iberian lesson #10, Megan and David tell us all about the rich Spanish tradition of eating shellfish with the delicious crisp white wine. So, we’re literally getting a taste of another culture: “mariscos”, seafood, shellfish, Spain, white wine, “vino blanco”.
Lizy: So, now, we’ve been introduced to do different dishes. One from Perú and one from Spain.
Alan: And we also learned a bit about what these dishes mean in their cultural contexts. Let’s finish up this comparison by listening to Costa Rican Lesson #10, where Natalia and Carlos, tell us about “gallo pinto”, the traditional Costa Rican breakfast. Here’s what we heard.
Lizy: Wow, that sounds really interesting.
Alan: Yes. To be honest, I don’t know that much about Costa Rican food.
Lizy: Yes, me neither. I know they’re pretty fond of beans, but beyond that, I guess I’ll just have to check out Naty and Carlos.
OUTRO
Alan: And now, you can start to get an idea of what we work on here, in the Regional Spanish Series and have a detailed lesson write up, which summarizes the lesson content. And you can pick this up at our site. So, stop by Spanishpod101.com and sign up for a free seven day trial and check it out for yourself.
Lizy: While you’re there, you can also check out the line by line audio transcripts of today’s lesson conversation, and the vocabulary list with audio, too.
Alan: A great way to insure memorization. Plus many more tools that you can use to develop your own method, the method that works best for you. That’s really one of the most important things to do as you begin to learn Spanish. For example, when I started learning Spanish, I detent the film festivals and watch the Latin American movies. And even though they had subtitles, it got my ear used to the sound of Spanish. And really would like to encourage you to visit our forum, post your questions, post your tips, help others and receive help in return. Really, we’re a learning community here.
Lizy: Yes, get involved in our forum is a great, great way to stay motivated. So, be sure to keep your eyes out for other introduction lessons, which show you what our lessons are all about and how you can make best use of them. Stop by the site for more information on how to make use of our resources.
Alan: And while you’re there, don’t forget, leave us a comment in the forum. Offer examples, ask for examples, post your questions, your complements, your ideas, even your critics. Let us know how we can improve and develop our course to best suit your needs. Don’t worry, we have thick skin, I’ve said it before. We can take it.
Lizy: Okay, have a great day and good luck with your studies. ¡Hasta pronto!
Alan: ¡Hasta pronto!

Dialogue - Costa Rican

Dialogue - Iberian

Dialogue - Peruvian

Dialogue - Standard

9 Comments

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SpanishPod101.com
Friday at 6:30 pm
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Thanks to Kevin Macleod for the music in today's lesson! So how about a little feedback... what is your favorite series and why?

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SpanishPod101.com
Tuesday at 12:38 pm
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Hola Dave,


Gracias por comentar!

Tienes razón, ya hemos corregido el error :wink:

- You are right, we have fixed the mistake.


Let us know if you have questions regarding any of our lessons.


Saludos,

Laura

Team SpanishPod101.com

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Dave
Monday at 2:33 pm
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Hola, creo que hay un error en la transcripción de la variante costarricense. La transcripción sugiere que Silvia dice «Quiero comer un pinto» pero dice en realidad «Quiero comerME un pinto».


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Hello, I think there is a mistake in the transcript for the Costa Rican variant. The transcript has that Silvia says "Quiero comer un pinto", but she actually says "Quiero comerME un pinto."

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SpanishPod101.com
Thursday at 4:38 pm
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Hola Ramon,


Thank you for your thumbs up! :thumbsup:


Please let us know if you have any questions!

Engla

Team SpanishPod101.com

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Ramon
Wednesday at 1:10 am
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:thumbsup:

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SpanishPod101.com
Tuesday at 1:53 pm
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Hola Lisa,


Thank you for your comment!

I would say Costa Rica Spanish is similar to Mexican Spanish than the others.


Sigue practicando,

Carla

Team SpanishPod101.com

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Lisa
Sunday at 10:26 pm
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Buenos dias!

Is any of the 3 regions more similar to Mexican Spanish?

Muchas gracias!

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DeeAnna
Thursday at 10:07 am
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:grin:


Muchas gracias por tu ayuda con todos tipos de español.

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Carlos
Saturday at 4:04 am
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I for one like the Costa Rican Series and Newbie Season 2...what can I say? I play favorites.