Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Fernando: Hello everyone, this is Fernando. Gengo Spanish, lesson 19 - Downtime is in Order! Hello JP.
JP: Hey, Fernando. ¿Cómo estás?
Fernando: Bien, gracias.
JP: So welcome, everyone, to the Gengo Spanish at SpanishPod101.com, where we study modern Spanish in a fun, educational format! We’ll help you brush up on the Spanish that you started learning long ago, or start learning today. Either way, thanks for being here with us for this lesson. So, Fernando, what are we gonna look at in this lesson?
Fernando: In this lesson, you will learn about expressing desire and intention. This conversation takes place on the beach. The conversation is between Jimmy and Valentina. The speakers are using the familiar register.
JP: Alright, let's listen then.
DIALOGUE
VALENTINA: Bueno, Jimmy, ¿qué tienes planeado para esta semana?
JIMMY: No estoy seguro. El lunes y martes me quedo con una familia anfitriona. Después estaré libre para conocer. Pienso ir a Isla Mujeres.
VALENTINA: Isla Mujeres es una maravilla. ¿Vas a nadar con los tiburones?
JIMMY: Tal vez sí. Tengo muchas ganas de ir.
VALENTINA: ¿Y Chichén Itzá?
JIMMY: Si quiero ir, pero no sé. Está un poco lejos.
VALENTINA: ¿Y Xcaret?
JIMMY: No creo.
JORGE: ¿Tulum?
JIMMY: ¿Qué es eso?
VALENTINA: Es un sitio con ruinas de los maya, y con una playa muy bonita.
JIMMY: Wow, ¿me escribes el nombre?
JP: One more time, with the translation.
VALENTINA: Bueno, Jimmy, ¿qué tienes planeado para esta semana?
JP: So Jimmy, what have you got planned for this week?
JIMMY: No estoy seguro. El lunes y martes me quedo con una familia anfitriona. Después estaré libre para conocer. Pienso ir a Isla Mujeres.
JP: I’m not sure. Monday and Tuesday I'm staying with a host family. Afterwards I’ll be free to sightsee. I want to go to Isla Mujeres.
VALENTINA: Isla Mujeres es una maravilla. ¿Vas a nadar con los tiburones?
JP: Isla Mujeres is marvelous. Are you going to swim with the sharks?
JIMMY: Tal vez sí. Tengo muchas ganas de ir.
JP: Maybe so. I really want to.
VALENTINA: ¿Y Chichén Itzá?
JP: What about Chichén Itzá?
JIMMY: Si quiero ir, pero no sé. Está un poco lejos.
JP: I do want to go, but I don’t know. It’s a little far.
VALENTINA: ¿Y Xcaret?
JP: What about Xcaret?
JIMMY: No creo.
JP: I don’t think so.
JORGE ¿Tulum?
JP: Tulum?
JIMMY: ¿Qué es eso?
JP: What’s that?
VALENTINA: Es un sitio con ruinas de los maya, y con una playa muy bonita.
JP: It’s a site with Mayan ruins, and with a very pretty beach.
JIMMY: Wow, ¿me escribes el nombre?
JP: Wow, can you write down the name for me?
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
JP: Hey Fernando, are we getting sponsored by the Mexican Tourist Board or something?
Fernando: It seems like it! Valentina is asking Jimmy if he's going to see all these tourist spots on the Mayan Riviera.
JP: Ok, the Mayan Riviera is the Caribbean coast of the Yucatán Peninsula... Cancún, Playa del Carmen...
Fernando: Yes, Cancún and Playa del Carmen are the two biggest ports of call tourists to the Mayan Riviera, and today Valentina is asking about some other sites, Isla Mujeres, Chichén Itzá, Xcaret, Tulum...
JP: Now Chichén Itzá and Tulum are a couple of famous Mayan archeological sites, Chichén Itzá of course famous for the Mayan pyramid.
Fernando: Xcaret is an eco-park.
JP: What's an eco-park?
Fernando: It's kind of a Maya, Yucatán, theme park resort...
JP: Ok. Jimmy wasn't that into Xcaret.
Fernando: No, but he was intrigued by Tulum... that's a beautiful archeological site.
JP: Oh yes, it was a Mayan seaside outpost, that protected their ancient maritime trade routes.
Fernando: Shall we look at the vocabularies?
JP: Yes.
VOCAB LIST
Fernando: lejos [natural native speed]
JP: far
Fernando: lejos [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Fernando: lejos [natural native speed]
JP: Next.
Fernando: la ruina [natural native speed]
JP: the ruins
Fernando: la ruina [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Fernando: la ruina [natural native speed]
JP: Next.
Fernando: nadar [natural native speed]
JP: to swim
Fernando: nadar [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Fernando: nadar [natural native speed]
JP: Next.
Fernando: la maravilla [natural native speed]
JP: the wonder
Fernando: la maravilla [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Fernando: la maravilla [natural native speed]
JP: And the last word.
Fernando: anfitrión [natural native speed]
JP: host
Fernando: anfitrión [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Fernando: anfitrión [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
JP: Ok, let’s take a look at these words again, where are we gonna start?
Fernando: Let's start with the word lejos
JP: Lejos, means far, the opposite of near. Lejos.
Fernando: Lejos. Next, la ruina.
JP: Ok, so a ruin, so an old rundown building. In the context of this dialog, we were talking about the ancient Mayan ruins.. in the plural.. las ruinas. And the singular la ruina.
Fernando: La ruina. The next word is nadar.
JP: Nadar, to swim. On Isla Mujeres they'll sell you a ticket to swim with a shark in a pen. Nadar.
Fernando: Did you do that?
JP: No, but a friend of ours did. There's video. What's next?
Fernando: Next is la maravilla.
JP: La maravilla, this is a marvel, a wonder. The mayan pyramid at Chichén Itzá is a wonder... es una maravilla.
Fernando: Si, la maravilla. Now our last word is an adjective, anfitrión.
JP: Ohh, anfitrión, meaning host. Now we usually think of this word as the noun el anfitrión, but when we use it in the dialog today, we're talking about a host family, so we need the adjective.
Fernando: Jimmy talks about staying with a familia anfitriona.
JP: Ok, here we have the feminine form of the adjective, anfitriona. The dictionary form though, the masculine form, is anfitrión.

Lesson focus

JP: Ok the focus of this lesson is expressing desire and intention, today we're going to do that using some modal constructions.
Fernando: What's a modal construction?
JP: Well the easy answer is that it's a verb that you use with an infinitive, let me give an example. For instance, Jimmy says "I'm thinking about going to Isla Mujeres."
Fernando: Pienso ir a Isla Mujeres.
JP: Right so the thing he's thinking about doing is to go to Isla Mujeres, that's the ir a Isla Mujeres part. you can hear the inifintive ir. Ir a isla mujeres. Ir means to go. Ir.. a Isla Mujeres.
Fernando: And to say he's thinking about it, he says "Pienso... Pienso ir a Isla Mujeres."
JP: Right... that pienso is the first person form of the verb pensar, to think. Pienso. So then to that modal verb pienso we add the infinitive phrase ir a Isla Mujeres.
Fernando: Pienso ir a Isla Mujeres.
JP: Cool, now you can swap out the infinitive there for any action you're thinking about doing. So if you want to say "I'm thinking about swimming with a shark... Pienso...
Fernando: Pienso nadar con un tiburón. You can do that in Isla Mujeres.
JP: Or if you're thinking about looking for a hotel.... pienso...
Fernando: Pienso buscar un hotel.
JP: Exactly. Use that infinitive buscar. So besides pensar to think about, there are other modal verbs you can swap out. Maybe you want to say "I want to go Isla Mujeres, you'll want to use the modal verb querer. So I want to go to Isla Mujeres...
Fernando: Quiero ir a Isla Mujeres. I imagine you can use other people, also, tú quieres ir a Isla Mujeres, ellas quieren ir a Isla Mujeres.
JP: That's right, querer with any subject, plus the infinitive of the action. Queremos... we want, We want to go to Isla Mujeres....
Fernando: Queremos ir a Isla Mujeres.
JP: Ok, let's look at another one more modal that we saw in the dialog. Let's look at tener ganas de...
Fernando: Tener ganas de, this is a whole verbal... expression... it's a phrase. It means like you feel like doing something...
JP: Yah, it's like to have a hankering to have a desire to do something. Tener ganas de. Just like the other modals, you're going to follow it with an infinitive. So Jimmy says "tengo ganas de ir." I feel like going, I want to go.
Fernando: Actually, JP, he says tengo muchas ganas de ir...
JP: Alright, so I have a lot of desire to go. tengo muchas ganas de ir. So to summarize, we have tener ganas de, querer, and pensar.
Fernando: Pensar plus infinitive, to think about doing something, querer plus infinitive, to want to do something, and tener ganas de plus infinitive, to have the desire to do something.
JP: Excellent summary, my friend.

Outro

Fernando: Ok, I think that’s a wrap.
JP: Alright, before we go, don't forget to stop by SpanishPod101.com, and pick up the lesson notes. There you can find the conversation transcript, vocab, sample sentences, a grammar explanation, and a cultural insight section. We put that altogether to help you study this lesson. Hasta luego.
Fernando: ¡Adiós!

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Have you ever been to Mexico? If so, where have you been? :)