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Lesson Transcript

Hello, and welcome to the Culture File: Mexico series at SpanishPod101.com. In this series, we’re exploring essential cultural information about Mexico, Mexican Culture, and Mexican People. In this lesson, we’re going to learn about a popular Mexican holiday. I’m Michael, and you're listening to Season 1, Lesson 1 - Day of the Dead
The Day of the Dead, or "Día de Muertos" in Spanish, is a celebration that blends pre-Hispanic traditions and Christian beliefs. In contrast to European festivities, in which people wear black clothes, in Mexico people celebrate with vibrant and colorful decorations and events.
On the eve of the festival, many families erect altars decorated with marigolds and multicolored paper flags. These altars are also adorned with offerings, such as food and beverages, which add a variety of hues to the celebration. Similarly, the pantheons, or "panteones", wear their best clothes, waiting for a visit from the deceased, in Spanish called "difuntos", along with the thousands of others who travel to their hometowns to be with their family, or "familia", and remember their loved ones.
On November 1st, the “muertos chiquitos,” referring to deceased children, are celebrated. It’s said that on that day the spirits of deceased children visit their former homes, so toys, candies, chocolates, and honey are placed on altars, or "altares", and the graves, or "tumbas", to sweeten their visit to this world. The return of the adult spirits is anticipated for the following night, for whom altars are also decorated with what used to be their favorite treats. Among the most traditional dishes is "pan de muerto", meaning literally - bread of the dead. This treat is essentially a round piece of bread covered with sugar. Other offerings include “pulque”, “mole”, “tamales“, and “atole."
Days before the festival, shops and houses are decorated with humorous scenes of skeletons, or "calaveras", and nowadays it is common to find hints of Halloween characters as well. In traditional markets, all imaginable kinds of toys, decorations and candies that allude to death shine brightly.
So listeners, how did you like this lesson? Did you learn anything interesting?
Have you ever tried the traditional bread of the dead?
Leave a comment telling us at SpanishPod101.com! Until next time!

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SpanishPod101.com
Monday at 6:30 pm
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Have you ever tried the traditional bread of the dead?

 

 

SpanishPod101.comVerified
Wednesday at 2:23 pm
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Hola Vickie,


Thank you for your questions.

No, they mean that people that visit los panteones wear their best clothes.

Sigamos practicando!


Saludos,

Carla

Team SpanishPod101.com

Vickie
Tuesday at 11:03 am
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Me gusta que los “muertos chiquitos” tienen un día solamente por ellos. (I like that the children are honored by having a day to themselves). Preparar el pan de muerto es posible para me si aprendería hacer pan sin gluten. (In order to make "el pan de muerto" I would need to learn how to make gluten-free bread, first). En el futuro puede que tratar hacer. (In the future, maybe I will try to make it). Buscaba las comidas y los bebidos en el sitio web y es muy interesante. (I looked for the food and beverages online and found it very interesting).


Tengo una pregunta. La oración que dice : "Similarly, the pantheons, or "panteones", wear their best clothes, waiting for a visit from the deceased, in Spanish called "difuntos", along with the thousands of others who travel to their hometowns to be with their family, or "familia", and remember their loved ones".

I am confused. If pantheons means cemetery, then when it says they "wear their best clothes" is that figurative, because the cemetery is decorated?

SpanishPod101.com
Monday at 6:42 am
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Hola Goo,


Thank you for your comments.

We will consider your suggestion on the lesson audios in just Spanish for future lessons.

"panteón" means pantheon, mausoleum, cemetery

As for deceased, you can say difunto, cadáver, muerto, fallecido

Yes, you can say "Tengo una familia grande.".

Both stated sentences on your last comment are correct. Remember to not translate literally, cause this way it won't make sense. "decoraremos" is the conjugated verb "decorar" and "saldrá" is the future tense of "salir".

Sigamos practicando!


Saludos,

Carla

Team SpanishPod101.com

goo
Tuesday at 11:28 pm
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Decoramos el altar con comida.

"We decorated the altar with food."

from examples here.

in dictionary say decorar de is to decorate with so Should it be different.


and is this some sort of expression

Mi familia saldrá de viaje.

"My family is going on a trip. "

The dictionary has salir de viaje. but does not explain what it means

has salir de as meaning to come from

I was wondering about the "a"

goo
Tuesday at 10:59 pm
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Tengo una familia extensa. I have a large family. Could it be Tengo una familia grande.

goo
Tuesday at 7:12 am
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http://tinyurl.com/goodiadelosmuertos algunos bien fotos

some good photos.

goo
Tuesday at 4:20 am
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How about having a version in just Spanish. People could listen to the one they want. It would not be hard to add this. And would make it more of challenge for some. Too hard for some and just right for others.

Any your definition of panteón(Mexican) pantheon does not help me.

fondo means background lol difunto(Mexican) deceased I thought decease was spelled difundo.... then if mean they were somehow in the background. Are there other words used for deceased. In English we have several. And what are the ways of saying someone died. Passed, snuffed out, struck down, six feet under, promoted to glory, off the hook, not with us anymore,

What are some in Spanish?

Kind of like they are still around... you put out food for them and visit the graves.

So please give more of an explantion of panteón.

Spanishpod101.comVerified
Tuesday at 12:55 am
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Hola Dragos,

¿cómo estás?


Thank you for your message. We appreciate your feedback.


However, it's important to get used to different pronunciations, voices, accents, as part of your learning experience ;)


Looking forward to seeing you often here (and thanks for explaining your nickname)



Cristiane

Team Spanishpod101.com

Dragos
Monday at 9:38 pm
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Hi.


Why don't you use the same narrator for both English and Spanish? When the girl's voice was introduced, I was taken by surprise a little, because I got used to the male voice. I see it as a disruption in the flow of the audio. Looking forward to see if this is a big issue or not (for me).


Thanks,

Dragos (it comes from romanian "Dragoste" = love, not "dragons", as many think it does:P)

SpanishPod101.comVerified
Tuesday at 11:37 am
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Hola hajsamar MA,


Thank you for your feedback.

We'll take this in consideration for future lesson.

Meanwhile, please try using our playback speed tool in the audio lessons, is right next to the audio timer. :wink:


Saludos,

Carla

Team SpanishPod101.com