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Lesson Transcript

Let's look at some examples.
Listen and repeat or speak along with the native speakers.
Mark: Soy de Nueva York.
Mark: Soy de Nueva York.
Ángel: Soy de Guadalajara.
Ángel: Soy de Guadalajara.
Emma: Soy de Seattle.
Emma: Soy de Seattle.
Jack: Soy de Londres.
Jack: Soy de Londres.
Víctor: Soy de Veracruz.
Víctor: Soy de Veracruz.
Mia: Soy australiana.
Mia: Soy australiana.
Did you notice how the last speaker omits the de and replaces a city name with australiana?
Mia Martin: Soy australiana. "I'm Australian." Soy australiana.
Instead of de plus the {CITY NAME} placeholder, she uses an adjective for her nationality.
This pattern is
Soy {NATIONALITY}.
"I'm {NATIONALITY}."
Soy {NATIONALITY}.
In Mia Martin’s case, she uses a feminine adjective to describe herself.
Mia Martin: Soy australiana.
In the case of a male speaker from Australia, he would use a masculine adjective, australiano, to describe himself.
Soy australiano. I’m Australian. Soy australiano.
You should be aware of this pattern, but for this lesson, we’ll use the pattern
Soy de {CITY NAME}.
"I'm from {CITY NAME}."
Soy de {CITY NAME}.

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Let's look at some more examples.
Listen and repeat or speak along with the native speakers in the video.