Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

Let's take a closer look at the conversation.
Do you remember how Mark asks,
Mark Lee: "Are you a student?"
Mark Lee: ¿Eres estudiante?
First is eres, which means "are," as in "you are." Eres (enunciated). Eres.
Note: eres is a shortened form of tú eres, “you are.” In Spanish, tú, “you” is often omitted as it is understood.
Eres comes from the verb ser, meaning "to be." Ser.
Next is estudiante, "student." Estudiante (enunciated). Estudiante.
In Spanish, all nouns have grammatical gender and are either singular or plural. Estudiante is masculine and singular.
All together, it’s ¿Eres estudiante? "Are you a student?" ¿Eres estudiante?
Now, let's take a closer look at the response.
Do you remember how Angel says,
"No, I'm not a student. I'm an investor."
Ángel Salazar Almonte: No, no soy estudiante. Soy inversionista.
First is no, "no." No (enunciated). No.
It answers Mark's yes-or-no question, "Are you a student?" ¿Eres estudiante?
After this, Angel specifies that he is not a student. No soy estudiante."I'm not a student." No soy estudiante.
First is no, meaning "not" here. No.
Next is soy. "[I] am." Soy (enunciated). Soy.
Note: soy is a shortened form of yo soy. In Spanish, the yo, "I," is usually omitted as it is understood.
Soy is from the verb ser, meaning "to be." Ser.
Together, no soy, literally means "not [I] am." But it translates as "I'm not." No soy.
Next is estudiante. "Student." Estudiante.
All together, No soy estudiante. "I'm not a student." No soy estudiante.
Angel then tells Mark his actual occupation. Soy inversionista. "I'm an investor." Soy inversionista.
First is soy. "[I] am." Soy.
Next is inversionista. "Investor." Inversionista (enunciated). Inversionista.
Inversionista is a masculine singular noun.
Together, Soy inversionista. "I’m an investor." Soy inversionista.
All together, No, no soy estudiante. Soy inversionista.
"No, I'm not a student. I'm an investor."
No, no soy estudiante. Soy inversionista.
The pattern is
No, no soy {occupation}. Soy {actual occupation}.
"No, I'm not {occupation}. I'm {actual occupation}."
No, no soy {occupation}. Soy {actual occupation}.
Imagine you’re Emma López, a student.
Ángel Salazar asks you if you’re a "teacher." The word for a female "teacher" is maestra. Maestra (enunciated). Maestra.
Say
"No, I'm not a teacher. I'm a student."
Ready?
Emma López: No, no soy maestra. Soy estudiante.
Emma López: "No, I'm not a teacher. I'm a student."
Emma López: No, no soy maestra. Soy estudiante.
In Spanish, some occupations have the same word for both genders. For example, estudiante.
estudiante
estudiante.
However, much of the time, words will differ depending on gender. In general, nouns that end in -o tend to be masculine, while nouns that end in -a tend to be feminine.

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Can you talk about your occupation using the pattern introduced in this lesson?