Dialogue

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Dylan: Hola, hola a todos. This is Dylan, ¿cómo están?
Carlos: What’s going on pod101 world? My name is Carlos and welcome to the Beginner series, season 4, Lesson #23.
Dylan: Hello everyone. I am Dylan and welcome to spanishpod101.com
Carlos: With us, you will learn to speak Spanish with fun and effective lessons.
Dylan: We also provide you with cultural insights...
Carlos: And tips you won’t find in a textbook.
Dylan: In this lesson, you will learn about possessive adjectives.
Carlos: The conversation takes place in Carlos’s house.
Dylan: The conversation is between Carlos and Mónica.
Carlos: The speakers are friends. They will be speaking informally. Remember, commenting each day...
Dylan: And posting in the forum are two great ways to get answers.
Carlos: Community members...
Dylan: And staff are all ready to help.
Carlos: Definitely take advantage of all of us. Okay, let’s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Mónica: Amor, ya llegué, ¿estás listo?
Carlos: Hola amor, estoy en mi dormitorio, ven.
Mónica: Carlos, ¡no puedes ir a la iglesia en pantalones cortos y sandalias!
Carlos: ¿Por qué no? Hoy hace mucho calor, no me voy a poner mi traje entero.
Mónica: Ya hablamos de esto, acordamos que te ibas a poner el pantalón de vestir con una camisa de manga larga.
Carlos: ¡NO! ¿Manga larga con este calor? ¡Voy a sudar como chancho!
Mónica: ¡¡Amor, lo prometiste!!
Mónica: Honey, I'm here. Are you ready?
Carlos: Hi, Honey. I'm in my bedroom, come…
Mónica: Carlos, you can't go to church in shorts and sandals!
Carlos: Why not? It's hot today; I'm not going to wear my suit.
Mónica: We talked about this; we agreed that you were going to wear your dress pants with a long sleeve shirt.
Carlos: NO! Long sleeves in this heat? I'm going to sweat like a pig!
Mónica: Honey, you promised!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Dylan: Oh no, not that you promised again.
Carlos: I know. You always hold up promising us over our heads you know but listen, this guy, it’s hot. It’s Latin America. It’s like 95 degrees outside.
Dylan: Yes, yes, Carlos, but its mass. He is going to a church.
Carlos: Yes.
Dylan: He does have to be respectful.
Carlos: The church does have air-conditioning.
Dylan: You do have to dress up for stuff like that.
Carlos: Why is it respectful to sweat?
Dylan: Just wear deodorant.
Carlos: You still sweat.
Dylan: Yes, but at least you are sweating in clothes that are acceptable to his parent in laws.
Carlos: That’s right and he is also going to be sweating because he’s never spot that. He is just not going to win in the situation.
Dylan: He is going to sweat any ways, no matter what.
Carlos: Okay guys, let’s take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
VOCAB LIST
Dylan: “Llegar”.
Carlos: “To arrive.”
Dylan: “Lle-gar”, “llegar”. “Dormitorio”.
Carlos: “Bedroom.”
Dylan: “Dor-mi-to-rio”, “dormitorio”. “Corto”.
Carlos: “Short”, “small”, “meager.”
Dylan: “Cor-to”, “corto”. “Sandalia”.
Carlos: “Sandal.”
Dylan: “San-da-lia”, “sandalia”. “Chancho”.
Carlos: “Pig”, “dirty”, “filthy pig.”
Dylan: “Chan-cho”, “chancho”. “Sudar”.
Carlos: “To sweat.”
Dylan: “Su-dar”, “sudar”.
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Carlos: Okay, let’s have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Dylan: The first word we will look at is “llegar”.
Carlos: “Llegar”, “to arrive.”
Dylan: Now does another verb pop into your head that you might confuse with “llegar”.
Carlos: Definitely “llevar”, “to take.” It’s hard to get them right in my head sometimes seriously.
Dylan: It will get easier.
Carlos: So what’s going on again with our happy couple?
Dylan: Well, it looks like it’s the big church day. Mónica showed up at Carlo’s house and announces her arrival with a very normal and every day way “Amor, ya llegué”.
Carlos: “Honey, I am here.” Yeah, “ya llegué” is pretty common. Keep that in mind, audience. When someone calls you on the phone looking for you and you have arrived, just say...
Dylan: “Ya llegué”.
Carlos: Also one other thing to point out is that the verb “llegar” is being conjugated in the first person singular of the preterit tense.
Dylan: Nice little tidbits of information to start us off.
Carlos: I thought so.
Dylan: When did you get back from the US when you went from Thanksgiving?
Carlos: “Llegué el sábado en la noche”:
Dylan: You arrived Saturday night.
Carlos: Ah, I know a related word that comes in with the airport.
Dylan: And what’s that?
Carlos: “La llegada”, or more specifically “las llegadas”.
Dylan: “The arrivals.”
Carlos: Next up.
Dylan: Next up on our list is “dormitorio”.
Carlos: “Bedroom”, although I don’t use that noun very often.
Dylan: You should. It’s the correct way of saying.
Carlos: I will save my way for the related word.
Dylan: That sounds good.
Carlos: But this Carlos is using “dormitorio” correctly “Hola amor, estoy en mi dormitorio, ven”.
Dylan: “Hi honey, I am in my bedroom, come.”
Carlos: They say “Amor hola”.
Dylan: Don’t you?
Carlos: Yeah, I do but still it’s more noticeable when someone else does it.
Dylan: Well, how about a sample sentence?
Carlos: “Yo duermo en el dormitorio más grande de la casa”.
Dylan: Rrrrrr
Carlos: “Yo duermo en el dormitorio más grande de la casa”.
Dylan: “I sleep in the biggest bedroom in the house.”
Carlos: That’s true for me considering I only have one bedroom.
Dylan: Ah well, I guess that could be true then.
Carlos: Now the related word was one that I was going to use which is “el cuarto”. I refer to all rooms by that one word, “room”.
Dylan: Now that is not incorrect. Just bedroom is “dormitorio”. Think about it. How do you say “to sleep” in Spanish?
Carlos: “Dormir”, “dormitorio”. Right, I get it.
Dylan: But will you remember the word now that you have that connection?
Carlos: Yes, I will.
Dylan: Next up, “cortos”.
Carlos: “Cortos”, “short.”
Dylan: See this is where the gringo and Carlos is coming out.
Carlos: Why is that?
Dylan: “Carlos, ¡no puedes ir a la iglesia en pantalones cortos y sandalias!”
Carlos: “Carlos, you can’t go to the church in shorts and sandals.” If there are, they used to wear shorts all the time.
Dylan: Well, it does have to be torture sitting in the church when its 90 degrees out.
Carlos: I can’t say that I have done that, but yeah a little detail or something that you would know if you grew up in the church like discomfort, although I think Carlos’s reasoning is sound.
Dylan: You would.
Carlos: “Cortos” does not only describe pants.
Dylan: No, no, anything short actually, “Manuela tiene pelo corto”.
Carlos: “Manuela has short hair.”
Dylan: And the opposite would be the adjective “largo” which I think is self evident.
Carlos: “Long.”
Dylan: Next up, a fun little noun, “sandalias”.
Carlos: “Sandalias”, “sandals.”
Dylan: Once again, we heard it in our conversation.
Carlos: “Carlos, ¡no puedes ir a la iglesia en pantalones cortos y sandalias!”
Dylan: “Carlos, you can’t go to church in shorts and sandals.”
Carlos: I like to wear sandals when it’s hot though. I mean shoes take too much effort in the heat.
Dylan: That is true.
Carlos: Actually, “Ayer me compré unas sandalias muy baratas”.
Dylan: How much were the sandals you bought yesterday?
Carlos: 3000.
Dylan: 3000 colones.
Carlos: Yeah, 3000 colones is around $6.
Dylan: Well, not bad but they weren’t flip-flops. That’s a little expensive for flip-flops.
Carlos: No, they weren’t flip-flops.
Dylan: Don’t you have another word for sandals?
Carlos: I do, “chancletas”, but I think like in Puerto Rican slang.
Dylan: No, I think it’s Latin slang. We say it too.
Carlos: Good to know. I can’t think of any other time where I would use the word “sandalias”.
Dylan: Next up something no one likes to be called, “chancho, chancha”.
Carlos: A noun that means “pig”, “dirty”, “filthy pig.” Anything good.
Dylan: No, no, that’s not good.
Carlos: Now this is where Carlos is giving his reasons which once again I think are sound. “¡NO! ¿Manga larga con este calor? ¡Voy a sudar como chancho!”
Dylan: “No! Long sleeves in this heat? I am going to sweat like a pig!”
Carlos: I don’t have a sweating problem but wearing a dark suit when the heat is horrible. Thank god I never had to do that when I had a conventional job. Summer is off you know.
Dylan: Well, did you hear that “Hay chanchos en los Estados Unidos que son mascotas”?
Carlos: I heard that. For some reason, people like to have them as pets but to me they look pretty ugly and I don’t think I would want them for that. I mean I said to my cat thank you very much.
Dylan: They actually say they are pretty clean and that the stereotype doesn’t fit.
Carlos: Yeah, I know. I am just being difficult and just mental but can you imagine like a pig sleeping in your bed with you?
Dylan: No, I can’t but you know, the more common word for pig I believe it is actually term….
Carlos: “Cerdo”.
Dylan: Pig, right. We don’t say pork either when describing the meat.
Carlos: Right in Spanish, it is just pig.
Dylan: Last but not least, “sudar”.
Carlos: That’s a new one, “to sweat”, right?
Dylan: If that’s new, how did you know?
Carlos: I heard it in the conversation and it was last example.
Dylan: “¡Voy a sudar como chancho!”
Carlos: “I am going to sweat like a pig.”
Dylan: Well, let’s think of another sample sentence. “Vas a sudar mucho cuando salgas a correr”.
Carlos: “You are going to sweat a lot when you go out running.” Okay, now I have another verb under my belt. Now Dylan, are there any other verbs or words that can relate to “sudar”, “to sweat”?
Dylan: I don’t know any related words.
Carlos: Well, we would always say let’s see… “llorar”, “to cry”, liquid leaving the body.
Dylan: Yeah.
Carlos: And drops, “sudar”, “llorar”.
Dylan: Not so much.
Carlos: Okay, fine.
Dylan: Let’s move on.
LESSON FOCUS
Carlos: To what, grammar?
Dylan: Yeah, possessive adjectives show ownership and agree with the nouns they modify in number and gender.
Carlos: Okay, these can be tough.
Dylan: Not all possessive adjectives have both singular and plural, masculine and feminine forms as the list below displays. When it is unclear to whom the ownership refers, we use extra words to clarify.
Carlos: Right. So we have a singular adjective plus singular noun.
Dylan: “Mi”.
Carlos: “My.”
Dylan: “Él es mi hermano”.
Carlos: “He is my brother.” The singular adjective plus plural noun...
Dylan: “Mis”.
Carlos: “My.”
Dylan: “Ellos son mis hermanos”.
Carlos: “They are my brothers.” The plural adjective with a singular masculine noun...
Dylan: “Nuestro”.
Carlos: “Our.”
Dylan: “Él es nuestro hermano”.
Carlos: “He is our brother.” Then the plural adjective plus a plural masculine noun.
Dylan: “Nuestros”.
Carlos: “Our.”
Dylan: “Ellos son nuestros hermanos”.
Carlos: “They are our brothers.” Then a plural adjective plus a singular feminine noun.
Dylan: “Nuestra”.
Carlos: “Our.”
Dylan: “Ella es nuestra hermana”.
Carlos: “She is our sister.” Plural adjective plus plural feminine noun.
Dylan: “Nuestras”.
Carlos: “Our.”
Dylan: “Ellas son nuestras hermanas”.
Carlos: “They are our sisters.”
Dylan: Second person.
Carlos: [inaudible 11:39] construction, Spanish possessive adjective and then the Spanish example. So a singular adjective plus a singular noun...
Dylan: “Tu”.
Carlos: “Your.”
Dylan: “Él es tu hermano”.
Carlos: “He is your brother”, a singular adjective plus a plural noun
Dylan: “Tus”.
Carlos: “Your.”
Dylan: “Ellos son tus hermanos”.
Carlos: “They are your brothers.” A plural adjective plus a singular masculine noun.
Dylan: “Vuestro”.
Carlos: “Your.”
Dylan: “Él es vuestro hermano”.
Carlos: Now this is tricky. It translates to “he is all your brother” but it is kind of like “he is our brother” in English. That’s a more – less direct translation but that’s what it means. “He is our brother” as in our being plural.
Dylan: As in everybody.
Carlos: “Vosotros”. A plural adjective plus a singular feminine noun.
Dylan: “Vuestra”.
Carlos: “Your.”
Dylan: “Ella es vuestra hermana”.
Carlos: “She is all your sister” or “she is all of our sister” or you get the point. “She is all of our sisters.” No, “she is our sister” meaning all of us were big family, spanishpod101.com family, and then a plural adjective with a plural feminine noun...
Dylan: “Vuestras”.
Carlos: “Your.”
Dylan: “Ellas son vuestras hermanas”.
Carlos: “They are all your sisters.” You have a lot of sisters. Then third person, you can check out the same pattern. Singular adjective with a singular noun.
Dylan: “Su”.
Carlos: “His”, “her”, “your”, “its.”
Dylan: “Él es su hermano”.
Carlos: “He is his/her/your/its brother.” A singular adjective with a plural noun...
Dylan: “Sus”.
Carlos: “They are all your.”
Dylan: “Ellos son sus hermanos”.
Carlos: “They are all your brothers.” A plural adjective for the singular noun...
Dylan: “Su”.
Carlos: “They are all your”.
Dylan: “Él es su hermano”.
Carlos: “He is their” or “all your brother.” And finally, a plural adjective with a plural noun.
Dylan: “Sus”.
Carlos: “They are all your.”
Dylan: “Ellos son sus hermanos”.
Carlos: “They are their all your brothers.” Now let’s get some example sentences down to make this clear.
Dylan: “Nuestra reunión será muy divertida”.
Carlos: “Our get together will be a lot of fun.”
Dylan: “Ese chico tiene problemas, sus notas son bajas”.
Carlos: “That boy has problems. His grades are low.”
Dylan: “Es tu idea”.
Carlos: “It’s your idea.”
Dylan: “Su consejo es inteligente. Gracias, señora”.
Carlos: “Your advice is intelligent. Thank you ma’am.”
Dylan: Or the example from today’s conversation, “no me voy a poner mi traje entero”.
Carlos: “I am not going to wear my suit.”
Dylan: Don’t confuse the second person singular adjective “tu”, “your”, with the personal pronoun “tú”, “you.”
Carlos: Don’t worry though. I still do it all the time guys.
Dylan: Notice that the accent here not only tells us where to emphasize the pronunciation of the word but it also tells us that the word is a possessive adjective and not a personal pronoun. That is it tells us its function.
OUTRO
Carlos: You got that guys. Okay, and you know what, that just about does it for today.
Dylan: Ready to test what you just learned?
Carlos: Make this lesson’s vocabulary stick by using lesson specific flashcards in the learning center.
Dylan: There is a reason everyone uses flashcards.
Carlos: Because they work.
Dylan: They really do help memorization.
Carlos: You can get the flashcards for this lesson at...
Dylan: Spanishpod101.com
Carlos: All right.
Dylan: ¡Hasta luego!
Carlos: Nos vemos, ¡chao!

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SpanishPod101.com
Thursday at 6:30 pm
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Dress to impress while in South America!

SpanishPod101.comVerified
Thursday at 1:14 pm
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Hello Goopach,


Thanks for sharing that with us!


Regards,

Erica

Team SpanishPod101.com

Goopach
Tuesday at 1:14 pm
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yes dress is very important in Mexico to folks that have money. one book I read in Mexico had like 5% of the book on how important it is. I stopped wearing sweats as much