Dialogue

Vocabulary

Learn New Words FAST with this Lesson’s Vocab Review List

Get this lesson’s key vocab, their translations and pronunciations. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account Now and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Notes

Unlock In-Depth Explanations & Exclusive Takeaways with Printable Lesson Notes

Unlock Lesson Notes and Transcripts for every single lesson. Sign Up for a Free Lifetime Account and Get 7 Days of Premium Access.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Intro: Estás escuchando SpanishPod101.com
Natalia: Buenos días, me llamo Natalia.
Carlos: What’s going on? My name is Carlos. Beginner Series, Season 3, Lesson number 1.
Natalia: If you like, come back tomorrow.
Carlos: What’s going on, Pod101 world? My name is Carlos and I am joined here by Natalia.
Natalia: ¿Cómo están?
Carlos: How’s everyone doing? You know, Nati, sometimes secretaries at a doctor’s office aren’t polite.
Natalia: Yeah, but Carolina is very polite with Alejandro.
Carlos: Well, it might be stressful though, like every call is important, you know, to that person.
Natalia: Yeah, that’s why it’s important to keep things formal and calm.
Carlos: Makes sense. I always find with situations like that that it’s always your best bet.
Natalia: I agree.
Carlos: What grammar point do you have for us today?
Natalia: Well, I have the very important preposition “de”.
Carlos: Now, listen up, Pod101World, if you’re listening to an iPod…
Natalia: Or an iTouch or an iPhone…
Carlos: Click the center button of the iPod or tap the screen on the iTouch or iPhone to see the notes for this lesson while you listen.
Natalia: Read along while you listen.
Carlos: This technique will help you remember faster, ok? Let’s get into today’s conversation.
DIALOGUE
1. KARINA: Buenos Días, ¿en qué le puedo ayudar?
2. ALEJANDRO: Buenas, quería contactar al doctor para ver los resultados de unos exámenes.
3. KARINA : Disculpe, pero el doctor no se encuentra en este momento.
4. ALEJANDRO : No hay problema, ¿cuando puedo contactarlo?
5. KARINA: Si gusta, puede llamarlo mañana.
6. ALEJANDRO: Perfecto, muchas gracias.
Carlos: And now slower. Una vez más, esta vez lentamente.
1. KARINA: Buenos Días, ¿en qué le puedo ayudar?
2. ALEJANDRO: Buenas, quería contactar al doctor para ver los resultados de unos exámenes.
3. KARINA : Disculpe, pero el doctor no se encuentra en este momento.
4. ALEJANDRO : No hay problema, ¿cuando puedo contactarlo?
5. KARINA: Si gusta, puede llamarlo mañana.
6. ALEJANDRO: Perfecto, muchas gracias.
Carlos: And now with the translation. Ahora incluiremos la traducción.
1. KARINA: Buenos Días, ¿en qué le puedo ayudar?
1. KARINA: Good morning, how may I help you?
2. ALEJANDRO: Buenas, quería contactar al doctor para ver los resultados de unos exámenes.
2. ALEJANDRO: Morning, I wanted to contact the doctor to see the results from some tests.
3. KARINA : Disculpe, pero el doctor no se encuentra en este momento.
3. KARINA: Excuse me, but the doctor is not here at this time.
4. ALEJANDRO : No hay problema, ¿cuando puedo contactarlo?
4. ALEJANDRO: No problem, when can I contact him?
5. KARINA: Si gusta, puede llamarlo mañana.
5. KARINA: If you'd like, you can call him tomorrow.
6. ALEJANDRO: Perfecto, muchas gracias.
6. ALEJANDRO: Perfect, thank you very much.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Carlos: You know, Nati, I swear I don’t like doctor’s offices because everybody seems so stressed out all the time.
Natalia: I know, I know, I know. But, you know, it’s important though. You shouldn’t avoid doctor’s.
Carlos: Well, I don’t avoid doctor’s, it’s the whole idea, like you feel like you’re bothering them and you have to fill out all those forms, and right now I don’t have health insurance and if I get sick down here what do I do?
Natalia: You go and open up the doors and be like “Aaah!” and they take you in emergencies even if you don’t have insurance.
Carlos: That’s good.
Natalia: Just so you know.
Carlos: Excellent. So if I do get hurt ever…
Natalia: Go straight to emergencies.
Carlos: I’ll go straight to the emergency room. Alright, well now that I got the direction from Nati, let’s take a look at the vocabulary for today’s lesson. First up we have a verb.
VOCAB LIST
Natalia: “Ayudar”.
Carlos: “To help.”
Natalia: “A-yu-dar”, “ayudar”.
Carlos: Como por ejemplo...
Natalia: “El contexto de la palabra nos ayuda a entenderla”.
Carlos: “The context of a word helps us to understand it.” ¿Y otro verbo?
Natalia: “Contactar”.
Carlos: “To contact”, “get in touch.”
Natalia: “Con-tac-tar”, “contactar”. An example, ”¿a qué número te puedo contactar?”.
Carlos: “At what number can I contact you?” ¿Y un sustantivo masculino?
Natalia: “Resultado”.
Carlos: “Result.”
Natalia: “Re-sul-ta-do”, “resultado”. Por ejemplo, “esos resultados desafortunadamente no nos dicen mucho”.
Carlos: “The results unfortunately don’t tell us much.” ¿Y un verbo?
Natalia: “Encontrar”.
Carlos: “To find”, “to meet with.”
Natalia: “En-con-trar”, “encontrar”. Por ejemplo, “encuentran la playa”.
Carlos: “They find the beach.” And now…
Natalia: “Si”.
Carlos: “If.”
Natalia: “Si”, “si”. Por ejemplo, “Si lloviera esta noche, retiraríame de aquí a mil años o mejor a cien no más”.
Carlos: “If it were to rain tonight, I would withdraw from here 1,000 years, or maybe just 100.” And last but not least, a masculine noun.
Natalia: “Examen”.
Carlos: “Examination”, “exam.”
Natalia: “E-xa-men”, “examen”. Por ejemplo, “¿cuántos exámenes no has aprobado?”
Carlos: “How many exams haven’t you passed?”
Natalia: Carlos.
Carlos: Yes, Nati.
Natalia: You should try reading that one. “Si lloviera esta noche, retiraríame de aquí a mil años o mejor a cien no más”. That’s an interesting…
Carlos: That’s a Cesar …
Natalia: Sentence.
Carlos: Vallejo.
Natalia: ¿Cómo? I like it!
Carlos: “Si lloviera esta noche, retiraríame de aquí a mil años o mejor a cien no más”.
Natalia: Entonces, “Si lloviera esta noche, retiraríame de aquí a mil años o mejor a cien no más”.
Carlos: I'm trying, I'm trying. Alright, Nati, thank you for that. Let’s have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Natalia: The first word we’ll look at is “ayudar”.
Carlos: “Ayudar”, “to help”. You know what, another practical verb to learn.
Natalia: Why is that?
Carlos: Well, if you’re in trouble, you could scream “¡Ayúdame!”, “Help me!”.
Natalia: Well, that’s one important one to learn if you look at it that way, or the more calm if you need directions, como “¿usted puede ayudarme?”.
Carlos: If you want to be respectful, yes. And then I still think this is funny.
Natalia: What?
Carlos: You know, I was lost the other day and I had to ask directions but I knew I had to go through the whole, “buenas señor, ¿cómo está?”. He answered “bien, por dicha. ¿Y usted?” And then I proceeded to tell him that I was lost. Where I'm from, all you say is, “excuse me, is this the road to…?”
Natalia: Don’t laugh at the fact that Ticos are polite.
Carlos: No, never. Well, how can we define “ayudar” in Spanish?
Natalia: Well, “prestar cooperación”.
Carlos: I could see how “to lend cooperation” could be a definition cause you’re lending help.
Natalia: Well, when Carina asks Alejandro, “buenos días. ¿En qué le puedo ayudar?”
Carlos: “Good morning. How may I help you?” Nati, didn’t you used to answer phones in an office.
Natalia: Oh, don’t even remind me…
Carlos: How many times a day did you do that?
Natalia: Not really… I was just like, hello… That was when I used to work in Human Resources so usually the people that call me was people I knew, so I was like “buenos días, ¿en qué lo puedo ayudar…?”, bla bla bla, a tons of times a day.
Carlos: Ok, I won’t bring it up again. Obviously it upsets you.
Natalia: Have to block that part of my life.
Carlos: Ok, but how about one more sample sentence.
Natalia: Well, last week as you know, Carlos, we had a huge earthquake here and we had many victims.
Carlos: Yeah, it was a bad… a little North of San Jose. We were on the phone, remember?
Natalia: “Bueno, yo ayudo a las víctimas del terremoto con dinero”. “Well, I helped the victims of the earthquake with money.”
Carlos: You know, me too. There are a lot of special accounts at the bank now just for that. It’s a big deal here.
Natalia: Moving on, next word we have another verb, “contactar”.
Carlos: “Contactar”. “To contact”, “to get in touch.”
Natalia: “Contactar” can be defined as “establecer contacto o comunicación con alguien”. You could figure this one out also when Alejandro wants to speak to the doctor, he tells Carina: “Buenas. Quería contactar al doctor para ver los resultados de unos exámenes”.
Carlos: “Morning. I wanted to contact the doctor to see the results from some tests.” Those are always stressful phone calls, Nati.
Natalia: Yeah, those are the ones where they tell you, “Please wait”, and then the music comes out. Ugh… Well, you know, Carlos, you can use this in a more everyday way.
Carlos: How?
Natalia: Like, for example, “el estudiante necesita contactar a su profesor”.
Carlos: “The student needs to contact their professor.” Well, audience, if you need to contact us, you can reach us by leaving a comment.
Natalia: Hint. Ok, next a masculine noun, “resultado”.
Carlos: “Resultado”. “Result.” That’s pretty straight forward.
Natalia: “Re-sul-ta-do”.
Carlos: “Resultado”, and in our conversation?
Natalia: “Buenas, quería contactar al doctor para ver los resultados de unos exámenes”.
Carlos: “Morning. I wanted to contact the doctor to see the results for some tests.”
Natalia: Carlos, you give me a sample sentence.
Carlos: Keeping things fresh I see, Nati. Ok, well here is a sentence that can be taken either way.
Natalia: What?
Carlos: “El resultado del examen fue positivo”. “The results of the tests were positive.”
Natalia: Oh yeah, well all that depends on the context. Let’s go to our next word. Another verb, “encontrar”.
Carlos: “Encontrar”. “To find”, “to meet with.”
Natalia: Or “dar”. Dar con alguien o algo que se busca. And in our conversation we heard it in the “disculpe, pero el doctor no se encuentra en este momento”.
Carlos: “Excuse me, but the doctor is not here at this time.” So here it is insinuating presence.
Natalia: Más o menos.
Carlos: Well, how about another example sentence that corresponds with our definition we see here?
Natalia: “Voy a encontrar la información en internet”.
Carlos: “I'm going to find the information online.” Well, there you go. I see it now. You know, I would name a popular website that Nati got me really obsessed with but I'm not going to mention their name, I was about to but they’re rich enough.
Natalia: I think I know what you’re talking about.
Carlos: I know you do. Ok, what’s next?
Natalia: “Si”.
Carlos: “Sí”, like “yes”.
Natalia: No, no, no. “Si”, “if”, “but”.
Carlos: What’s the difference?
Natalia: Well, there is an accent on the “i” then it’s “yes”, but without an accent “si” is an interjection that means “if” or “but”.
Carlos: Ok.
Natalia: We’re getting complicated, huh? “Si: denota condición o suposición en virtud de la cual un concepto depende de otro u otros”.
Carlos: Oh, that clears everything up.
Natalia: In the conversation, Carina says, “si gusta, puede llamarlo mañana”.
Carlos: “If you’d like, you could call him tomorrow.” Ok, I could see that.
Natalia: Or another example would be “si tú quieres yo te llamo más tarde”.
Carlos: “If you want I’ll call you later.” I think I got it. What about you, audience?
Natalia: Last but not least, “examen”, a masculine noun.
Carlos: I got this one, “exam”, “examen”, “examen”, “exam.”
Natalia: Someone gets this man a cookie so I can still run away laughing.
Carlos: Ok, well it is a cognate, no?
Natalia: Yes, both of these words are very similar. “Indagación y estudio que se hace acerca de las cualidades y circunstancias de una cosa o de un hecho”. So tell us how it was used in this conversation.
Carlos: Well, we’ve already seen the example today so it’s pretty easy to recall. “Buenas, quería contactar al doctor para ver los resultados de unos exámenes”. “Morning, I wanted to contact the doctor to see the results for some tests.”
Natalia: But I'm sure you can think of another sentence.
Carlos: Give me a sec. Ok, here we go. “Los exámenes de idiomas son muy fáciles para mí”.
Natalia: “The language exams are very easy for me.” I know you’re talking about me and not you.
Carlos: What? The exams can be easy, don’t doubt me.

Lesson focus

Natalia: Ah ok. Carlos, I propose we look at prepositions.
Carlos: Sure, did you have any in mind?
Natalia: Actually I did. The preposition “de”.
Carlos: Ah, good one.
Natalia: Do you know what “de” is used to express?
Carlos: “De” is used to express possession and membership.
Natalia: How does it do this?
Carlos: We express the possession by means of the name of the possessor preceded by the preposition “de”.
Natalia: How so?
Carlos: Well, for example, “el libro de Martín”, “Martin’s book.”
Natalia: And with membership?
Carlos: And with membership we do not refer to the relationship between the possessor and the thing possessed. Instead we refer to the attributes or objects contained in a person or thing.
Natalia: Can we say that in another way?
Carlos: Sure. We convey the qualities, nature, condition or character something or someone. For example, “es un día de sol”. “It’s a sunny day.”
Natalia: Along these lines we use the preposition “de” to express the material of which something is made.
Carlos: For example.
Natalia: “La falda de algodón”. “The cotton skirt”. Well, this issue has an extended to signify of the matter or issue or of something.
Carlos: For example?
Natalia: “El discurso trata de la economía”. “The lecture is about economics”.
Carlos: I see.
Natalia: So the prepositions are invariable, they will never undergo any form changes. Like we see in the verbs, nouns or adjectives.
Carlos: Right, but you can expect to see this preposition used as a prefix at the beginning of the word sometimes. You know, we’ll go deeper into that another time, won’t we, Nati?
Natalia: Yes, we will. Here are some sample sentences to help you on the way.
Carlos: Shoot.
Natalia: “¿Dónde dejaste el libro de Martín?”
Carlos: “Where did you leave Martin’s book?”
Natalia: “No podrás resistir la sinceridad de Miguel”.
Carlos: “You won’t be able to resist the sincerity of Miguel.”
Natalia: “Al entrar a la sala noté de inmediato el brillo del piso”.
Carlos: “Upon entering the living room, I immediately noticed the shine of the floor.”
Natalia: “Eres un estudiante de talento, te recomiendo que sigas con los estudios”.
Carlos: “You’re a student of talent, I recommend you continue with your studies.”
Natalia: ”El puente de madera se está por romper”.
Carlos: “The wooden bridge is about to break.”
Natalia: “¿Han visto mi cuaderno de cuero?”
Carlos: “Have you seen my leather notebook?”
Natalia: “Te presto mi libro de geografía”.
Carlos: “I’ll lend you my book of geography.”
Natalia: “Hablábamos de la política”.
Carlos: “We were talking about politics.” Wow, wow, wow there, Nati, no politics or religions discussed on SpanishPod101.com.
Natalia: Oh yeah, I forgot to see the terms and condition before writing this. I'm sorry.

Outro

Carlos: Well, you know, that’s it. That does it for today, Nati, I can't go any farther.
Natalia: Are you ready to test what you just learned?
Carlos: You know, make this lesson’s vocabulary stick by using the lesson-specific flashcards in the Learning Center.
Natalia: There is a reason everyone uses flashcards.
Carlos: Because they work.
Natalia: They really do help memorization.
Carlos: You can get the flashcards for this lesson at…
Natalia: SpanishPod101.com
Carlos: Alright, ¡nos vemos!, ¡chao!
Natalia: Adios.

Grammar

Spanish Grammar Made Easy - Unlock This Lesson’s Grammar Guide

Easily master this lesson’s grammar points with in-depth explanations and examples. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Dialog - Bilingual

Vocabulary

11 Comments

Hide
Please to leave a comment.
😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍
Sorry, please keep your comment under 800 characters. Got a complicated question? Try asking your teacher using My Teacher Messenger.

SpanishPod101.comVerified
Tuesday at 6:30 pm
Pinned Comment
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Thanks to Herman Pearl for the music in today's lesson! I hate being given the runaround by doctors and other professionals. It is really, really annoying.

SpanishPod101.comVerified
Sunday at 9:14 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hola Frank,


Thank you for your question.

They mention the verb "encontrar" - to find, to meet with. "dar con alguien" is like to meet with.

Sigamos practicando!


Saludos,

Carla

Team SpanishPod101.com

Frank R Timmons
Wednesday at 8:18 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

A quick question: Was Natalie saying at 8:43 of the audio that "Dar con alguien" and "algo que se busca" can be used instead of encontrar, depending on the contact? Or, something else about how they are related? Thanks! Frank

SpanishPod101.comVerified
Tuesday at 1:06 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hola Richard,


Thank you for your comment! :smile:

Our team is very happy to know you're enjoying the lessons.

Please let us know any question or doubt you have.


Saludos,

Carla

Team SpanishPod101.com

Richard Flynn
Thursday at 10:46 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Thanks for that! "Si gusta" was a new phrase for me, so that's nice!

Spanishpo101.com
Tuesday at 11:55 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hola Billy,


No, sorry we don't. But we do have a chat for premium plus students.:sunglasses:

Which is a one on one chat, where you can send videos and audios.


Saludos,

Carla

Team SpanishPod101.com

billy allen
Monday at 12:12 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

do you guys ever have live tutorial sessions online?

Spanishpo101.com
Saturday at 10:40 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hola Ashley,


Art doesn't need to make sense.

El arte no necesita tener sentido.


Saludos,

Carla

Team SpanishPod101.com

Ashley
Thursday at 9:44 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

"If it were to rain tonight, I would

withdraw from here a thousand

years, or maybe just a hundred."


I don't even know what this means in English...:sob:

Rodney
Sunday at 1:27 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

A mi me gusta esta leccion mucho! Estuvo muy bien, y muy util también.

Elizabeth
Thursday at 8:44 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Is 'contactar' used only in terms of communication, or can it be used to mean 'to contact' as in 'to touch'? For example, "Don't allow the blue wire to contact the red"?


I'll have to look up some of César Vallejo's work...Thanks for the lesson!