Dialogue

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Lizzie: Bienvenidos a SpanishPod101.com!
Lizzie: Buen días, soy Lizzie.
Allan: Soy Allan. Beginner Series, Lesson number 30 - Phone card. Frustration - 1.
Lizzie: Sean bienvenidos.
Allan: Hi there, everybody, coming to you from a tiny tiny city of nine million people on the Pacific coast, Lima, Peru.
Lizzie: Hi, everybody. Hi, Allan. How is it going?
Allan: It’s going great, Lizzie. You guys are listening to the thirtieth lesson of the Beginner Series coming to you on demand from SpanishPod101.com.
Lizzie: Ready for a challenge?
Allan: Well, we’ve got one for you. Today we’re going to listen to Andres who is trying to make a phone call to Paola, but he’s using a phone card and he’s having trouble understanding exactly what he needs to do in order to get the call to go through.
Lizzie: Esto siempre sucede con los extranjeros.
Allan: Pero claro es que cuando uno no está acostumbrado a escuchar este tipo de instrucciones resulta bien complicado.
Lizzie: So, with this lesson you’ll learn how to use a phone card in Spanish which you’ll probably have to do at some point if you come to Latin America.
Allan: And if that weren’t enough on top of that we’re going to learn a new verb tense today.
Lizzie: Which one?
Allan: el tiempo pretérito perfecto
Lizzie: ¡Hay que bien! Es un tiempo muy pero muy útil.
Allan: That’s right, guys. With this tense you’re going to learn how to express what has happened and what we have done.
Lizzie: Very interesting topic.
Allan: Interesting, yeah, but it’s also useful. This is a really great step to take in the learning process.
Lizzie: Sounds like it’s going to be another good one.
Allan: No doubt, Lizzie. Now, before we jump into today’s lesson conversation I just want to remind all of our free subscribers that only the last 25 lessons of SpanishPod101.com are available on the Public Feed. This means that if you’re listening through ITunes you really should stop by SpanishPod101.com and check out the earlier lessons of this series since these lessons are sequential and by listening to them sequentially you’re going to really be able to build a terrific solid foundation.
Lizzie: And if you prefer to listen to the audio on your IPod and you want all of the lessons, just sign up for a basic or a Premium subscription and that way you’ll be sure to never miss a lesson.
Allan: Alright, Lizzie. It’s about that time.
Lizzie: Listen carefully to the following conversation.
DIALOGUE
GRABACIÓN: ¡Bienvenido a su tarjeta 'Habla Más'... Por favor, ingrese su clave secreta.
ANDRÉS: A ver... ¿dónde está? Aquí está: 4... 3.. 3.. 5... 2... 5... 8...
GRABACIÓN: El número que usted ha marcado es incorrecto. Por favor verifique el número y vuelva a marcar.
ANDRÉS: ¡Pucha! 433-5 25... 9...
GRABACIÓN: El saldo de su tarjeta es un sol con cincuenta céntimos. Por favor, marque el número al que usted desea llamar.
ANDRÉS: 243-0754
GRABACIÓN: Usted no cuenta con saldo suficiente para realizar esta llamada.
GRABACIÓN: Welcome to your 'Habla Más' card... Please enter your PIN.
ANDRÉS: Let's see... where is it? Here it is: 4... 3.. 3.. 5... 2... 5... 8...
GRABACIÓN: The number that you've entered is incorrect. Please verify the number and dial again.
ANDRÉS: Shoot! 433-5 25... 9...
GRABACIÓN: The balance of this card is one Sol and fifty cents. Please, dial the number that you wish to call.
ANDRÉS: 243-0754
GRABACIÓN: You do not have sufficient funds to make this call.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Allan: Man, Andres, I know how you feel. I mean it can be really tough to do something as seemingly easy as to use a phone card when you’re doing it in Spanish.
Lizzie: Claro las instrucciones pueden ser dificil.
Allan: I know and sometimes they just don’t seem to work at all. But I’ve got to tell you, Lizzie. It’s certainly an improvement over the past one. Remember you had to put tons and tons of coins. I mean really communication has just become so much smoother. You just go into the right café now.
Lizzie: Sí ahora realmente ahora no tengo problemas con las tarjetas.
Allan: Alright. Enough of that. Time to go over the vocab.
Lizzie: Sounds like a good idea.
Allan: So, let’s begin with…
VOCAB LIST
Lizzie: ingresar
Allan: To enter.
Lizzie: ingresar, ingresar
Allan: Next, we’ll hea…
Lizzie: clave secreta
Allan: Secret code, pin.
Lizzie: clave secreta, clave secreta
Allan: Now, we’ll hear…
Lizzie: marcar
Allan: To dial.
Lizzie: marcar, marcar
Allan: Next, we’ll see…
Lizzie: verificar
Allan: To verify, to check.
Lizzie: verificar, verificar
Allan: Now, we’ll hear…
Lizzie: saldo
Allan: Balance.
Lizzie: saldo, saldo
Allan: And finally…
Lizzie: contar
Allan: To count, to have.
Lizzie: contar, contar
Allan: Alright, Lizzie. Now, before we move on to the usage, let’s focus really quickly on the pronunciation.
Lizzie: Muy bien. ¿Qué palabra?
Allan: Well, let’s tackle the construction clave secreta.
Lizzie: clave secreta
Allan: Two words here. clave which is “key or code” and secreta which is “a secret”. Now, the most important point here is to recognize the way that the sounds of these two words are fused together. Notice the last syllable of the first word VE from clave and then the first syllable of the second word SE from secreta. So, Lizzie, shows us how these words sound at normal speed, please.
Lizzie: clave secreta
Allan: That’s right. Notice there’s no pause in between them clave secreta.
Lizzie: clave secreta. Estudiemos entonces el uso de algunos vocablos.
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Allan: Let’s switch our focus to the usage of these words now, putting them into context to really see what they mean.
Lizzie: ¿Por dónde quisieras empezar?
Allan: Empecemos con la palabra ingresar.
Lizzie: Ok.
Allan: So, Lizzie, if Manuel goes into the building, then Manuel…
Lizzie: entra al edificio
Allan: So, you use the verb entra there.
Lizzie: Yep.
Allan: And in this sentence it means…
Lizzie: “To enter”.
Allan: Now, when Andres is trying to use his phone card he finds the pin and then he needs to…
Lizzie: tiene que ingresarla
Allan: Aha. And the verb you’ve used here is…
Lizzie: ingresar
Allan: And this means “to put in”. I mean it’s kind of like “to enter”, but the essential meaning here is that something is being put inside something else.
Lizzie: Right. That’s why we can also use this verb as a synonym for “deposit”.
Allan: Exactly. And here, in today’s conversation the recording tells Andres ingrese su clave secreta. into your pin.
Lizzie: ¿Seguimos?
Allan: Sure. Next stop, we have another verb: marcar.
Lizzie: Marcar.
Allan: And this verb has a couple of different meanings. For example in today’s conversation Andrés marca el número al que desea llamar. So, Lizzie, if he is on the phone and he has to marcar the number, then what does this verb mean here?
Lizzie: To dial.
Allan: Así es “to dial”. However, we should point out that in other cases this verb can mean “to show” as in ”to indicate”.
Lizzie: Claro por ejemplo la expresión de su cara marcó su felicidad.
Allan: Hey, that’s a great example. The expression on her face showed her happiness. So, you can see that the meaning of the verb marcar will depend on the context in which it’s used.
Lizzie: Muy bien.
Allan: ¿Avanzamos?
Lizzie: Sí maestro.
Allan: Ok. This time, a noun, a masculine noun. saldo
Lizzie: We heard this one in the conversation. The voice in the recording said El saldo de tu tarjeta es un sol con cincuenta céntimos.
Allan: Right. And this means: The balance of this card is one sol and fifty centimos. So, the word saldo here means “balance”, how much you’ve got left in an account. And this applies not only to phone cards but savings accounts, checking accounts, credit accounts etc.
Lizzie: We should do some lessons about bank and sections.
Allan: Yeah. There’s been some talk about that in the forum. I think it’s a great idea, so practical.
Lizzie: Ok, one more word.
Allan: Here again, another verb. This time contar.
Lizzie: This is one we’ve seen before.
Allan: We have, but we haven’t seen it used in this way.
Lizzie: A ver.
Allan: Well, previously we’ve seen how the verb contar can be used to calculate quantities.
Lizzie: Claro por ejemplo, conté todos los platos y falta uno.
Allan: Right. And by that you mean: I’ve counted all the plates and there is one missing. So, in this sense contar means ‘to count’. Now, in today’s conversation the voice on the phone card recording said Usted no cuenta con saldo suficiente para realizar esta llamada. “You do not have sufficient funds to make this call”. So, Lizzie, what’s the word that comes immediately after this verb contar?
Lizzie: It’s simply con
Allan: And con usually means “with”, right?
Lizzie: Right.
Allan: Aha. But here we’ve got a special case. When we say contar con it often means “to have” in the sense of “being provided with”.
Lizzie: Exacto. Por ejemplo se puede decir, contamos con la tecnología más avanzada de la industria.
Allan: And by that you mean “We have the most advanced technology in the industry.” And if we recall that the verb contar also means “to tell” and that un cuento is “tale” then we can also see how this construction contar con is kind of saying “to be able to say”. For example, cuentan con los recursos necesarios “They have the necessary resources”.
Lizzie: So, Allan, in today’s conversation Andres is using a phone card.
Allan: Right. Now, Lizzie, the way phone calls are often made in Peru is quite a bit different than in other places. Why don’t you tell us a little bit about the different kinds of phone calls you can make?
Lizzie: Bueno si tienes una linea fija puedes hacer llamadas hasta que se acabe el crédito.
Allan: Wow, that’s a good point, Lizzie. Lizzie is telling us about the fixed line telephones that are very, very popular in Peru. In fact they are often called las lineas populares . These are phones that you pay a monthly fee for and you receive a certain amount of minutes. Once those minutes are passed you need to buy a phone card to get additional minutes. But you can still receive calls. These kinds of telephones have been very, very popular with the people who don’t have a lot of money. It’s been a great way to get telephones into the houses of the poor people in Peru. And that’s good.
Lizzie: Y bueno cuando ya se haya acabado el crédito hay que usar tarjetas telefónicas.
Allan: That’s right. It’s very practical. So again when the minutes of your landline run out you have to buy a phone card , but thankfully this could be bought just about everywhere you turn: they’re selling them on the street corners, in the stores, everywhere.
LESSON FOCUS
Lizzie: Ahora estudiemos la gramática.
Allan: Time to learn how the language is working here and how to make it work for us.
Lizzie: And today’s topic is…
Allan: …The Preterit Perfect.
Lizzie: El Pretérito Perfecto.
Allan: It’s a great tense to learn. So, let’s start up by going back to the conversation to hear exactly how this was used.
Lizzie: Sure. The voice on the phone card recording says: El número que usted ha marcado es incorrecto.
Allan: And that means “The number that you’ve entered is incorrect”. So, Lizzie, what’s the verb in the preterit perfect here?
Lizzie: It’s ha marcado.
Allan: Ok. Two words. This we call a ‘compound tense’ since we need to use two different words together in order to express it.
Lizzie: Claro.
Allan: Ok First word here:
Lizzie: ha
Allan: Simply spelled “ha”. And Lizzie, what’s this verb in the infinitive?
Lizzie: haber
Allan: Right. Haber. So, the form ha is simply the third person singular of the present indicative. el ha ya ha usted ha Hey, what about the second word?
Lizzie: It’s marcado.
Allan: Ok. Now, what kind of word is this?
Lizzie: It’s a past participle of the verb marcar.
Allan: Great. So, when we say usted ha marcado we mean “You have dialed”. So, all we have to do is use a form of the verb haber conjugated to the present tense of the Indicative Mood and then simply add the past participle.
Lizzie: Should we quickly go over this form of haber?
Allan: Sin duda. Haber.
Lizzie: yo he, tú has , él ha , nosotros hemos ,vosotros habéis ,ellos han
Allan: Exactly. So, after this we’re going to just add the past participle of the main verb in the expression. So if we want to say “we have spoken”, we would say…
Lizzie: hemos hablado
Allan: Or “You have done a good job”.
Lizzie: Has hecho un buen trabajo.
Allan: And here again that “They invited us to have dinner”.
Lizzie: Nos han invitado a cenar.
Allan: Great. So, one of the things that we need to point out with this tense is that it expresses an action in the past and that the meaning of this action kind of reaches the present moment. For example He trabajado todo el día. “I’ve worked all day long”. Now, this kind of implies that I’m still working and that I’ve been working.
Lizzie: Interesting point, Allan.
Allan: And again, with this tense you can express what “has happened” or you “have done”.
Lizzie: Allan, when is it common to use this tense?
Allan: Ugh, Lizzie. You hear this tense every day. For example he terminado mi segundo y ahora estoy listo para el postre. “I’ve just finished my main course and now I am ready for dessert”.
Lizzie: ¿Y cual va a ser el postre?
Allan: un creme brulee con leche asada.
Lizzie: Que rico.
OUTRO
Allan: Well, that’s about it for today.
Lizzie: Como siempre maestro, ha sido un gustazo.
Allan: Gracias Lizzie. Now, from here, stop by SpanishPod101.com , pick up the PDF and check out the language tools in the Learning Center and if you’re looking for a greater challenge check out Cathy and Anna in the Lower Intermediate Lessons. And if you’re looking for an even greater challenge and an adventure, why not travel to Lima? Hey, come visit us and see what immersion is all about. You can start at El Sol, which is a language school that I started, and I guarantee you’ll learn a lot of Spanish and much, much more about Peruvian culture.
Lizzie: Muy bien eso fue todo por hoy. Sigan practicando, sigan estudiando y visiten el forum.
Allan: Take it easy, guys, but keep studying. You’ll see it really is worth it. Chao.
Lizzie: Chao!

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13 Comments

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SpanishPod101.com
Wednesday at 6:30 pm
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Thanks to Kevin Macleod for the music in today's lesson. Have any Spod101 users out there ever used a phone card with Spanish prompts? It can be very difficult for beginners. Understanding Spanish on the phone is one of the more challenging aspects of learning the language. ¿Alguien puede recomendarnos una marca buena de tarjetas para llamar de larga distancia?

SpanishPod101.comVerified
Monday at 5:11 pm
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Hola Mary,


Thank you for posting.

This topic is very confusing because we tend to translate literally, the English tense Present Perfect (ex. She has worked here for 2 years.) to Presente Perfecto (which in Spanish is called Pretérito Perfecto Compuesto, also known as antepresente. ex. Ella ha trabajado aquí por 2 años.)

The term "Presente Perfecto" is just a literal translation of the English tense. The correct way to refer to it in Spanish is "Pretérito Perfecto."

As a reference you can find information about the Spanish Tenses on this website (note that the Real Academia de la Lengua Española, is one of the most reliable sources of information regarding the Spanish language):

http://www.rae.es/diccionario-panhispanico-de-dudas/apendices/modelos-de-conjugacion-verbal


Please, let me know if you have any more questions.

Hasta pronto,

Laura

Mary
Thursday at 4:15 am
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Hola spanish pod 101!


Tengo una pregunta sobre el tiempo pretérito perfecto." Esta lección se llama "preterit perfect" pero los ejemplos aparecen ser del "present perfect." Creería que "pretérito perfecto" debe usar las formas de "haber" en tiempo pretérito?


In English - Other spanish dictionaries call what we learned today "present perfect", where the present indicative of haber + past participle is used. Preterit perfect uses the preterit indicative form of haber + past participle?


Am I wrong?

SpanishPod101.comVerified
Monday at 12:51 pm
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Hola Steven,


Thank you for your feedbacks.

We have fixed the typos.

Thank you for being always attentive, we really appreciate your feedbacks.


Saludos,

Carla

Team SpanishPod101.com

steven
Thursday at 9:10 am
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Some errors/typos in the transcript:


1. Allan: Now, when Andres is trying to use his phone card he finds the pin and then he needs to…

Lizzie: tiene ingresará


I believe Lizzie actually says: tiene que ingresarla


2. Lizzie: Claro por ejemplo la expresión de su cara marc su felicidad


I believe Lizze uses the word marcó,.


3. Allan: And con usually means “whiff”, right?


I believe this should be "with".

SpanishPod101.comVerified
Monday at 5:12 pm
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Hola Marie,


Thank you for your comment and feedback!

You are right, the audio says "cincuenta" instead of 40.

We corrected it already! thanks :smile:

Please, let us know if you have any question.


Kind regards,

Laura

Team SpanishPod101.com

SpanishPod101.comVerified
Sunday at 11:08 am
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Hola Bernie,


Thank you for your comment!

Sorry about that, if you feel the lesson is too fast for you please try using the "playback speed" tool next to volume.


Suerte,

Carla

Team SpanishPod101.com

Bernie Cullen
Friday at 2:43 am
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Why not translate the name of the speaker Grabacion? Tape recording.

Marie
Tuesday at 1:19 pm
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¡Hola de neuvo!


¡Espero que todos tengan un buen día! (I hope you all are having a good day!) I noticed in the Line By Line Audio Notes and the Lesson Notes it says "El saldo de tu tarjeta es un sol con cuarenta céntimos," instead of "cincuenta céntimos." Y no he usado una tarjeta para llamar con español solicita (And I haven't used a phone card with Spanish prompts).

Jessi
Wednesday at 3:40 pm
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HI Lori!

Yes, you don't need the "tu" or "yo", it's perfectly fine to start with "he" or "has" :)

Lori
Wednesday at 4:44 am
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Can i just use he or has by itself? It seems

Redundant to say tu has or yo he.