Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
JP: Welcome everyone to Basic Bootcamp Lesson 4. This one’s called Happy New Year. My name is JP and I'm here with Fernando.
Fernando: Hey, JP. Hey, everyone.
JP: ¿Cómo es tu?
Fernando: Bien, bien, gracias.
JP: So this lesson is called Happy New Year. What are we going to listen for?
Fernando: The countdown.
JP: The countdown. It’s going to be a New Year’s countdown, I suppose.
Fernando: Yes, yes.
JP: So I bet we’re going to hear some numbers, right?
Fernando: That is correct.
JP: Ok, so we’re going to listen for those numbers in this dialogue which you’re about to hear right now. Here we go.
DIALOGUE
GROUP: ¡Diez, nueve, ocho...!
GROUP: ¡Siete, seis, cinco...!
GROUP: ¡Cuatro, tres, dos, uno!
GROUP: ¡Feliz año nuevo!
JP: Let’s hear it again, dramatic speed.
GROUP: ¡Diez, nueve, ocho...!
GROUP: ¡Siete, seis, cinco...!
GROUP: ¡Cuatro, tres, dos, uno!
GROUP: ¡Feliz año nuevo!
JP: One more time with the translation.
GROUP: ¡Diez, nueve, ocho...!
GROUP: Ten, nine, eight...
GROUP: ¡Siete, seis, cinco...!
GROUP: Seven, six, five...
GROUP: ¡Cuatro, tres, dos, uno!
GROUP: Four, three, two, one...
GROUP: ¡Feliz año nuevo!
GROUP: Happy New Year!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
JP: Ok, Fernando, what did we just hear? What just happened?
Fernando: We were at a New Year’s Eve party and we heard everyone counting down to the last ten seconds until midnight struck.
JP: Ok. This is where everybody watches the clock and then the countdown happens, and then everybody shouts “Happy New Year!” And then there’s kissing and drinking…
Fernando: And mistletoe… Wait, no. that’s a different holiday. So you’ve been to a New Year’s Eve party then, JP.
JP: I’ve been to a few. Should we look at the vocabulary?
Fernando: Let’s.
VOCAB LIST
Fernando: Uno.
JP: One.
Fernando: Uno.
JP: What’s next?
Fernando: Dos.
JP: Two.
Fernando: Dos.
JP: What’s next?
Fernando: Tres.
JP: Three.
Fernando: Tres.
JP: What’s next?
Fernando: Cuatro.
JP: Four.
Fernando: Cuatro.
JP: What’s next?
Fernando: Cinco.
JP: Five.
Fernando: Cinco.
JP: What’s next?
Fernando: Seis.
JP: Six.
Fernando: Seis.
JP: What’s next?
Fernando: Siete.
JP: Seven.
Fernando: Siete.
JP: What’s next?
Fernando: Ocho.
JP: Eight.
Fernando: Ocho.
JP: What’s next?
Fernando: Nueve.
JP: Nine.
Fernando: Nueve.
JP: Ok, last one.
Fernando: Diez.
JP: Ten.
Fernando: Diez.
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
JP: Alright, let’s have a closer look at the usage of the words and phrases in this lesson. So, Fernando, counting backwards from ten to one is a great skill to have for countdowns.
Fernando: Countdowns are always exciting.
JP: Ok, so let’s hear the numbers again, but this time let’s hear it in order, like in counting order.
Fernando: Uno, dos, tres.
JP: Uno, dos, tres. Ok, this is “one, two, three”. Now remember, folks, when you’re pronouncing the O in uno and dos, you have to use a Spanish O, right? uno, dos. Not the American O, right? It’s not uno, dos. It’s uno, dos.
Fernando: Uno, dos, tres. That’s “one, two, three”.
JP: Ok, how about “four, five and six”?
Fernando: Cuatro, cinco, seis.
JP: Now for that number “five”, cinco, in Latin America we say cinco, in Spain they’d say cinco.
Fernando: Cinco.
JP: Cinco. Ok, and the word for “six”. It’s one little syllable, right? Seis.
Fernando: Seis. Siete, ocho, nueve.
JP: Ok, so Siete, ocho, nueve, these are “seven, eight and nine”. Siete, ocho, nueve. Siete is two syllables, right? Now if you jag it out to a three syllables like you’d say Si-e-te.
Fernando: Then you sound Gringo fabulous.
JP: Ok, so siete. Nueve is also only two syllables, so nueve. The first syllable nue is sometimes hard for English speakers to say in one syllable, right? Nueve.
Fernando: And the last number is diez. Just one syllable, Jp.
JP: Ok, just one syllable, diez, not di-ez.
Fernando: diez
JP: diez Number 10, diez.

Lesson focus

Fernando: Ok. So what’s the grammatical point you want to talk about now? We did all these numbers…
JP: Ok, so I want to talk about ¡Feliz año nuevo!.
Fernando: This is how we say “Happy New Year!”
JP: Right, ¡Feliz año nuevo!
Fernando: Now we really only say this one day a year.
JP: Yes, but for one day we say it a lot. Now I want to break it down just a little bit. The word for “happy” is…
Fernando: Feliz.
JP: Feliz. So if you’re looking at the lesson notes you can see that feliz ends in a Z, right? In a zeta, so in Latin America we say feliz and in Spain we would say feliz.
Fernando: Feliz.
JP: Feliz Now, ¡Feliz año nuevo! The last word is nuevo, right?
Fernando: nuevo, “new”.
JP: “New”. Ok, so the pronunciation tip I have for you all is that nuevo is a two syllable word, right? nue and vo. So if you say it in three syllables, nu-e-vo…
Fernando: JP, can you stop? I think they got the picture.
JP: Nuevo.
Fernando: JP?
JP: Ok, two syllables. Nue-vo. Now the last word is año.
Fernando: Año.
JP: Ok, means “year”, año. And here’s a good example of the ñ in the wild, right? The letter ñ. Now, folks, that ñ is a real Spanish letter and if you forget the squiggle when you write it, your Spanish teacher will mark it misspelled because then it says ano.
Fernando: Which means “anus”. So ¡Feliz año nuevo!, JP.
JP: Gracias, Fernando ¡Feliz año nuevo! Hey, Fernando, can you tell us any Mexican traditions for the año nuevo?
Fernando: In my home you tend to have a big dinner.
JP: Ok.
Fernando: Or before, accompanied by, you know, a bit of, you know, drink, adult drinks.
JP: Ok. Are there any crazy traditions like jumping or you have to kiss somebody? Or is there anything out of the ordinary that our American listeners might not know about?
Fernando: Well, there’s the grape tradition.
JP: The grape tradition? What’s that?
Fernando: You have 12 grapes ready to go once the clock strikes 12. So you have to eat a grape for each chime which will signify a wish that will come true.
JP: Ok, buy those chimes come like a second apart, right? They’re like dong, ding…
Fernando: You have to practice, JP. Yes.
JP: You need 12 grapes.
Fernando: You need 12 grapes and, more importantly, you need to know what you want to wish for.
JP: You have 12 wishes.
Fernando: You have 12 wishes, yes.
JP: Ok.
Fernando: So if you finish them all then you will have your wishes granted, or so they say, yes.
JP: Ok.

Outro

Fernando: Ok, folks. Thank you for listening. This has been Basic Bootcamp Lesson number 4, we’ll be back for lesson 5. Hasta luego.
JP: Hasta luego.

8 Comments

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SpanishPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 06:30 PM
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Hola a todos,

Do you have any New Year's Eve celebrations that you follow?

In my family, we shake coins at midnight, in hopes that our money will multiply in the new year. 

jp@spanishpod101.com

SpanishPod101.com Verified
Sunday at 11:43 PM
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¡Hola Prisca!


Muchas gracias for taking the time to leave us a comment. 😇


¡Feliz año nuevo! Although this is a bit outdated by now. 😄😄


Let us know if you have any questions.


Saludos,

Levente

Team SpanishPod101.com

Prisca
Thursday at 12:13 AM
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Felix año nuevo

SpanishPod101.com Verified
Sunday at 12:31 AM
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Hola Ron,


Thank you for your feedback!

Don't forget to practice your pronunciation, and stay tuned we have a new lesson for you every week!


Suerte,

Carla

Team SpanishPod101.com

Ron McGregor
Tuesday at 09:42 AM
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Thankyou for the pronunciation tips. No way do I want to sound like a Gringo . :flushed:. Wout never learn that from a book.

Catalina
Friday at 12:34 AM
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I wish "happy new year" was included with the vocabulary list with audio. I can't add it to my flash cards or word bank but I'll get around this.

JP Villanueva
Wednesday at 11:43 PM
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Shann,

Thats awesome! I'm a little fascinated with the idea of yellow underwear...

jp@spanishpod101.com

Shann
Wednesday at 09:32 AM
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When I lived in Ayacucho, Peru my host family ate 12 grapes at midnight making a wish as they ate each one. We also bathed with hot water that had flowers soaked in it to wash away all of our negative moments from the past and to start fresh. Oh, and my host mama bought everyone yellow underwear for good luck that we wore on that night. I don't know if that is a traditional practice, perhaps rooted in the Quecha people, or if it was just my family- I loved it!