Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Jessi: Hey, everyone. Jessi here.
Karen: And I’m Karen. Welcome to Absolute Beginners Season 1, Lesson 24; What Are You Going To Do in Latin America?
Jessi: All right. So let’s get right to it. Karen, what are we going to learn in this lesson?
Karen: In this lesson, we’re going to learn how to use, ir a, plus a verb which is used to talk about future actions.
Jessi: Where does this conversation take place and who is it between?
Karen: The conversation takes place at a bar and it’s between Paco and Samuel.
Jessi: So the conversation is between friends which means we’ll hear informal Spanish and they’re trying to decide what to order.
Karen: Let’s listen to the dialogue.

Lesson conversation

Paco: ¿Qué vas a pedir?
Samuel: No sé, Aún estoy pensando.
Paco: Yo también. Hay muchas opciones.
Samuel: Le voy a preguntar al mesero.
Jessi: Let’s listen to the dialogue one time, slowly.
Paco: ¿Qué vas a pedir?
Samuel: No sé, Aún estoy pensando.
Paco: Yo también. Hay muchas opciones.
Samuel: Le voy a preguntar al mesero.
Jessi: And now with the English translation.
Paco: ¿Qué vas a pedir?
Jessi: What are you going to order?
Samuel: No sé, Aún estoy pensando.
Karen: I’m not sure. I’m still thinking.
Paco: Yo también. Hay muchas opciones.
Jessi: Me too. There are a lot of choices.
Samuel: Le voy a preguntar al mesero.
Karen: I’m going to ask the waiter.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Jessi: So Karen, in this conversation, they’re at a bar. Is there anything you can tell me about bars in Spanish-speaking countries?
Karen: Well, let me say first that there are many different types of bars. There are the regular ones that people go just to drink because they are less expensive but there is nothing special about them. Now, there are other ones that are expensive and fancy and people go because it’s different. And there are also bars that are in a way a little like a club, where people actually dance a little, and in my opinion these are very fun.
Jessi: Yes, I agree. I went to Mexico a few years ago and almost everyone was dancing. I think dancing is a big part of partying out in Latin America. It wasn’t a night club but it was really fun. The good thing about these bars, most of the times is that it’s free to get in.
Karen: Yes, that’s true. Now, most of the bars sell food as well. But in a lot of cases, they also provide some kind of snack while you are drinking.
Jessi: But not all of them, right?
Karen: Actually, I would say that the less expensive bars provide something most of the times but the fancy bars, not so much.
Jessi: Hmm, I’d say that sounds about right.
Karen: Yeah. Also, sometimes the menus are huge and it’s hard to decide what to order. But just remember that the servers can always recommend the most popular dishes or drinks from the house.
Jessi: That’s for sure. They’re usually very honest. If you want to order something and you ask them if it’s good, sometimes they’ll recommend something else entirely to you instead.
Karen: Yes. And also, one thing about age, since we’re talking about bars. In most Spanish-speaking countries, you have to be 18 and over to be able to enter bars and clubs.
Jessi: So don’t forget. If you’re planning to go to a Spanish-speaking country, make sure to be 18 if you want to go to bars and nightclubs.
Karen: That’s right. And always remember to ask for recommendations when you’re going out to eat or drink.
VOCAB LIST
Jessi: Okay. Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is.
Karen: irse
Jessi: To leave, to take off, to get out.
Karen: ir-se, irse
Jessi: Next is.
Karen: aún
Jessi: Still, yet.
Karen: aún, aún
Jessi: Next, we have.
Karen: opción
Jessi: Option.
Karen: op-ci-ón, opción
Jessi: Next up is.
Karen: pedir
Jessi: To ask for, to request.
Karen: pe-dir, pedir
Jessi: Next is.
Karen: saber
Jessi: To know, to know how.
Karen: sa-ber, saber
Jessi: Next is.
Karen: pensar
Jessi: To think.
Karen: pen-sar, pensar
Jessi: Next is.
Karen: mesero
Jessi: Waiter, waitress.
Karen: me-se-ro, mesero
Jessi: Last we have.
Karen: preguntar
Jessi: To ask a question, to wonder.
Karen: pre-gun-tar, preguntar
KEY VOCABULARY AND PHRASES
Jessi: Let’s have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word we’ll look at is: ir, “to go.” Now this is an irregular verb, perhaps the most common verb in the Spanish language. It was conjugated in the dialogue. What form did it take on?
Karen: voy
Jessi: Meaning, “I go.” This is: ir, in the first person singular, voy, “I go.” We also saw another conjugated form of, ir, right?
Karen: Yes, right. Vas.
Jessi: “You go,” the second person singular of the verb: ir, vas, “you go.” In the lesson in those PDF, we put the rest of the verb conjugations of: ir, so please check those out.
Karen: In the dialogue, these forms of, ir, were followed by: a. Voy a…, vas a…
Jessi: Yes. And we’ll talk about that more later on in the lesson focus. What’s our next word?
Karen: aún
Jessi: aún, meaning “still.”
Karen: Paco asked Samuel what he’s going to have. And Samuel says: Aún estoy pensando.
Jessi: I’m still thinking.
Karen: Right. We can also use: aún no, if we want to say, “Not yet.”
Jessi: Yes. We can use it both ways in an affirmative sense and negative sense as well. Next is.
Karen: opciones
Jessi: Options. So as you can tell, this is a cognate, opciones. In the dialogue it’s used in the plural and singular would be: opción, which is option, alternative or choice in English.
Karen: In the dialogue, Paco says: Hay muchas opciones.
Jessi: There are a lot of choices. And our last word is.
Karen: pedir
Jessi: To ask for, to request.
Karen: Now, this is an IR verb.
Jessi: Right. In the dialogue, Paco says.
Karen: ¿Qué vas a pedir?
Jessi: What are you going to order? A very useful word for when you go out to eat.
Karen: For sure.
Jessi: Okay. Let’s move on to the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

Karen: In this lesson, you will learn how to use, ir a, plus a verb.
Jessi: Which in English is, “going to” plus a verb, as in “going to study.”
Karen: Yes. So let’s start.
Jessi: Okay. So as we mentioned before, the verb: ir, is one of the most commonly used in Spanish.
Karen: Usually, it just means to go, as in physically go somewhere.
Jessi: Right. But it also has the more idiomatic usage of “going to” as in “going to do something.” It’s the same as in English. You use it to talk about future actions. Before we go ahead and explain that, let’s review the conjugated forms of: ir.
Karen: Sure.
Jessi: I go.
Karen: Yo voy.
Jessi: You go.
Karen: Tú vas.
Jessi: He or she goes.
Karen: Él-ella va.
Jessi: We go.
Karen: Nosotros vamos.
Jessi: They go.
Karen: Ellos van.
Jessi: And how about you all go.
Karen: Ustedes van.
Jessi: Okay. And there’s one more form that’s used in Spain which is: vosotros.
Karen: Vosotros vais.
Jessi: So now that we over those different forms of, ir, let’s see how we use it in the grammar we’re learning today.
Karen: Again it’s: ir a, plus infinitive of a verb.
Jessi: Remember that the infinitive is the form that ends in AR, ER, or IR.
Karen: Yes. For example, in the dialogue, we had: Le voy a preguntar al mesero. And it’s translated as, “I’m going to ask the waiter.”
Jessi: We can see how the verb, ir, is there in the first person singular: le voy a, “I’m going to.” Let’s break it down.
Karen: Le voy a
Jessi: I’m going to.
Karen: preguntar
Jessi: Ask.
Karen: al mesero
Jessi: The waiter. All together again.
Karen: Le voy a preguntar al mesero.
Jessi: So when talking about something you are going to do, you can use: voy a, verb. “I’m going to” verb.
Karen: Exactly.
Jessi: And we also had another example of, ir a, in the dialogue.
Karen: Yes we did. Paco says: ¿Qué vas a pedir?
Jessi: What are you going to order? This time we have the second person singular form of, ir, which is: vas. Let’s break this one down, too.
Karen: Qué
Jessi: What.
Karen: vas a
Jessi: You going to.
Karen: pedir
Jessi: Order. All together again.
Karen: ¿Qué vas a pedir?
Jessi: What are you going to order? Great. The sentence order is basically word for word the same as English. Let’s look at some fresh new examples now.
Karen: Good idea. What about: Van a salir hoy en la noche.
Jessi: Which is, “they are going out tonight.”
Karen: Okay. So, van, comes from the verb: ir, and it’s in the third person plural.
Jessi: Yes. And we can also see how the infinitive, salir, comes after: Van a salir.
Karen: They are going to go out. Let’s try another example.
Jessi: Vamos a ir a la fiesta de Mario. And in English it’s, “We are going to Mario’s party.”
Karen: Yes. So, vamos, is a first person plural and, ir, “to go” is infinitive. So that’s: ir a, plus a verb in the infinitive.
Jessi: Right. So, vamos a ir.
Karen: We’re going to go.
Jessi: Right. So listeners, just keep in mind that this grammar point is basically like an equation.
Karen: Yes, that’s right. Just remember: ir a, plus the infinitive.
Jessi: All right. Well, that’s going to do it for this lesson. Listeners, do you the reason flash cards are so popular?
Karen: It’s because they work.
Jessi: We’ve taken this time-tested studying tool and modernized it with My Word Bank Flash Cards.
Karen: Learn vocabulary using your eyes and ears.
Jessi: It’s simple and powerful. Save difficult or interesting words to your personal vocabulary list called My Word Bank.
Karen: Master words in your My Word Bank by practicing it with flashcards.
Jessi: Words in My Word Bank come with audio, so you learn proper pronunciation.
Karen: While you learn to recognize words by sight.
Jessi: Go to SpanishPod101.com now and try My Word Bank and Flashcards today.
Karen: Thanks everyone for listening. Make sure to let us know if you have any questions.
Jessi: We look forward to hearing from you. See you all next time.
Karen: Adiós.

27 Comments

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SpanishPod101.com
Tuesday at 6:30 pm
Pinned Comment
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Tell us something you are GOING to do, in Spanish!

SpanishPod101.com
Sunday at 6:17 pm
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Hola Elwaters,


Thank you for your comment.

Si, es correcto. Sigamos practicando.

If you have any question or doubt please let us know.


Saludos,

Carla

Team SpanishPod101.com

Elwaters
Friday at 4:56 am
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La palabra “ir”es la infinitive y veo que está importante aprender las conjugación de esta palabras. Es irregular verbo.

SpanishPod101.com
Monday at 7:08 am
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Hola Jenny,


Thank you for your question.

No, they need to be together "a el" to replace for "all"

Sigamos practicando!


Saludos,

Carla

Team SpanishPod101.com

Jenny
Friday at 10:25 am
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voy a preguntar: Does the rule about using 'al' instead of 'a el' apply even if there is a word in between 'a' and 'el' like in the statement "voy a preguntar al mesero"? Gracias.

SpanishPod101.comVerified
Sunday at 2:40 am
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Hola Christie,


Gracias por participar. Muy bien!

Just one correction. Me voy a ver una película. - Im going to see a movie. or

Me voy al cine. - I'm going to the movies.

Let me know if you have any question.


Saludos,

Carla

Team SpanishPod101.com

Christie
Saturday at 12:47 pm
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le voy a la cine. (I'm going to see a movie.)

SpanishPod101.comVerified
Tuesday at 12:43 pm
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Hola Doug,


Thank you for your comment.

I know you have done your research and yes "le" is an indirect object and is also use with reflexive verbs.

And is use in a redundant way, but it's translation in english and closest use is as "I" in the phrase "le voy a" or "voy a". In the case we use "le" we have to remember that there is someone else we are refering to and to to ourselves.


Saludos,

Carla

Team SpanishPod101.com

Doug
Friday at 3:22 am
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¡Voy a aprender español, aunque me mate!


I'm going to learn Spanish, even if it kills me!

Doug
Friday at 3:15 am
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In the sentence "Le voy a preguntar al mesero" the "Le" most certainly DOES NOT refer to "I" as has been stated in the comments. Rather, it is the indirect object pronoun. The English equivalent in this case would be "him".


The sentence could be shortened to "Le voy a preguntar", which would mean "I'm going to ask him." But, "le" is ambiguous, and could refer to him, her, or you formal. So to provide clarity in cases where it may not be known exactly who is being referred to, the indirect object is often included in addition to the indirect object pronoun. In this case, el mesero is the direct object. The direct object is preceded by "a". (In this case, the "a" and "el" are contracted to "al".)


It seems redundant... But we do this occasionally in English, for the same purpose of clarifying who we are referring to. "I'm going to ask him, the waiter."


The complete list of indirect objects are:

me - me

te - you informal

le - he, she, you formal

nos - us

vos - you, plural informal

les - them, you plural formal

Spanishpod101.comVerified
Sunday at 5:32 am
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Hola Karen,


Hasta mañana!

Let us know if you have any question.


Saludos,

Carla

Team SpanishPod101.com