Dialogue

Vocabulary

Learn New Words FAST with this Lesson’s Vocab Review List

Get this lesson’s key vocab, their translations and pronunciations. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account Now and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Notes

Unlock In-Depth Explanations & Exclusive Takeaways with Printable Lesson Notes

Unlock Lesson Notes and Transcripts for every single lesson. Sign Up for a Free Lifetime Account and Get 7 Days of Premium Access.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Jessi: Hi, everyone, Jessi here.
Karen: And I’m Karen. Absolute Beginner, Season 1, Lesson 20. Are you lost in Latin America?
Jessi: Welcome back to our Absolute Beginner Series at SpanishPod101.com where you’ll learn Spanish with fun and effective lessons. Again, my name is Jessi, and Karen and I will be hosting the rest of this Absolute Beginner Series.
Karen: That’s right.
Jessi: So, Karen, what are we going to learn in this lesson?
Karen: In this lesson, we’re going to learn how to get directions and how to give directions as well.
Jessi: Something that’s very important. Where does this conversation take place and who is it between?
Karen: The conversation takes place at a university and it’s been Sergio and a student.
Jessi: Sergio and the student are strangers, so they’ll be speaking formally. Let’s listen to the dialog.

Lesson conversation

Estudiante: ¿Estás perdido?
Sergio: Un poco. Busco el departamento de historia.
Estudiante: Pasando la cafetería, a tu izquierda.
Sergio: Ya sé dónde. Gracias.
Jessi: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Estudiante: ¿Estás perdido?
Sergio: Un poco. Busco el departamento de historia.
Estudiante: Pasando la cafetería, a tu izquierda.
Sergio: Ya sé dónde. Gracias.
Jessi: And now with the translation.
Estudiante: ¿Estás perdido?
Jessi: Are you lost?
Sergio: Un poco. Busco el departamento de historia.
Karen: A little. I’m looking for the History Department.
Estudiante: Pasando la cafetería, a tu izquierda.
Jessi: Through the cafeteria to your left.
Sergio: Ya sé dónde. Gracias.
Karen: Now I know where. Thank you.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Jessi: Speaking of getting and giving directions, I think we can say that people in Spanish-speaking countries are very friendly and will most likely help you without a problem.
Karen: Yeah, I noticed that when I traveled. I had a lot of strangers helping me get to different places and they’re really nice about helping lost tourists.
Jessi: Yes, that’s right. Many times, they will even go out of their way to help you.
Karen: That’s really nice, especially when you’re in a place where you’re not familiar with anything.
Jessi: That’s right. It helps a lot when others try to help you. At the same time though, you do have to be careful and aware of your surroundings.
Karen: Right, that’s something that we all need to keep in mind, especially if you’re a tourist.
Jessi: There are very nice people out there, but not everyone is like that.
Karen: On the other hand, if you end up being on the streets and are totally lost, go and ask someone how to get to your destination. You shouldn’t feel embarrassed to do that.
Jessi: I agree.
Karen: Just remember that it’s always better to plan where you’re going. And if possible, get directions before leaving the hotel or the place you’re staying. Let’s take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
VOCAB LIST
Karen: The first word is?
Jessi: perdido
Karen: Lost.
Jessi: per-di-do, perdido.
Karen: Next is?
Jessi: Un poco.
Karen: A little.
Jessi: un po-co, un poco
Karen: Next we have.
Jessi: buscar
Karen: To seek, to look for.
Jessi: bus-car, buscar
Karen: Next is?
Jessi: pasar
Karen: To pass, to go by, to come by.
Jessi: pa-sar, pasar
Karen: Last we have.
Jessi: cafetería
Karen: Cafeteria, coffee shop.
Jessi: ca-fe-te-rí-a, cafetería
KEY VOCABULARY AND PHRASES
Karen: Let’s take a look at some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is, perdido, lost. This is “perdido” in the masculine form and “perdida” is a feminine form.
Jessi: Right. And it’s the past participle of the verb, perder, which means “to lose”. In the dialog, it was used in the question ¿Estás perdido? which means, “are you lost?”
Karen: Yes. And again, let’s remember that, perdido, ends with an “O” because it’s talking about a male person.
Jessi: Now, if we were talking about a female person, it would be: perdida. And one more thing, if we wanted to say, “we are lost” or “they are lost,” we would have to add an S at the end to make it plural.
Karen: So it would be “perdidas” or “perdidos”.
Jessi: Right. Next we have, un poco: a little. Here, “un poco” is translated as “a little” or “a bit”.
Karen: Right. It can actually be translated in other ways as well, depending on how it’s used. But most of the time, it means “a little” or “a bit”. So when the student asked Sergio, ¿Estás perdido?, “are you lost?” Sergio says: un poco, (a little). Maybe he was just a little too proud to just say yes and admit it. Okay. And next
Jessi: Buscar
Karen: “to look for”. This is an -AR verb, a really common one too.
Jessi: In the dialog, “buscar” is used in the first person singular, busco.
Karen: Right. So, “busco” here literally means “I look for”, but it translates to “I’m looking for”. And whatever you’re looking for comes right after.
Jessi: Busco el departamento de historia.
Karen: I’m looking for the History Department. And next we have.
Jessi: pasar
Karen: To pass, to pass through.
Jessi: Now, “pasar” means, to pass. In the dialog, the gerund is used, which is: pasando.
Karen: Right. So here it means “passing” or “passing through”.
Jessi: For now, we’ll just look at this translation, but “pasar” can be translated differently as well.
Karen: And lastly, we have
Jessi: cafetería
Karen: Cafeteria.
Jessi: Cafetería, can refer to different things, depending on what country you’re in.
Karen: Right. And in this conversation, they’re on a college campus and so it refers to a cafeteria like a lunch room. But be careful with the pronunciation.
Jessi: cafetería
Karen: In the English word, we tend to stress the “TER” in the middle, cafeteria. But in Spanish, it’s, one more time.
Jessi: cafetería
Karen: Right, cafetería. Okay, let’s move on to the grammar point.

Lesson focus

Karen: In this lesson, you’ll learn some useful phrases for getting and giving directions. First, let’s talk about how to say that you’re lost.
Jessi: Yes, because this is important to know. So for talking about yourself, you can say “Estoy perdido” or “Estoy perdida”, if you’re a female.
Karen: Right. And this means “I’m lost”. We have, estoy, which is the first singular form of, estar, which is used when talking about states.
Jessi: Right. Estoy perdido.
Karen: So, that’s how you can say that you’re lost. How can you tell someone what you’re looking for?
Jessi: Well, in that case, you can use the verb we learnt earlier and say “busco” and then the place you’re looking for. Together, this means “I’m looking for blank”.
Karen: Let’s look at some examples.
Jessi: Busco la avenida La Paz.
Karen: And it means “I’m looking for La Paz Avenue.”
Jessi: Or how about: Busco el banco.
Karen: I’m looking for the bank.
Jessi: Yes, of course you can ask where is something is using “¿Dónde está?” and then the place you’re looking for. And that means, “where is blank?” Simple, right, listeners? Now, let’s try one with ¿Dónde está?. ¿Dónde está la avenida La Paz?
Karen: And this means “where is La Paz Avenue?” Oh, and here’s a common one. ¿Dónde está el baño?
Jessi: Ah, where is the bathroom?
Karen: I think almost everyone learns this when they first start learning Spanish. Now here are some useful words and phrases you will hear when getting directions.
Jessi: derecha which means “to the right”.
Karen: izquierda which means “to the left”.
Jessi: And, derecho, which means “straight”.
Karen: Another useful one that’s used a lot is: Antes de blank, which means “before the blank”.
Jessi: And also: Después de blank, which means “after blank”.
Karen: Okay, let’s look at the examples we had in the dialog. So, Sergio tells the student that he’s looking for the History Department.
Jessi: Busco el departamento de historia.
Karen: And the student says:
Jessi: Pasando la cafetería, a tu izquierda.
Karen: Through the cafeteria to your left. So, this “pasando” can either mean “through” or “passing by”. And luckily, that’s all Sergio needs to hear, right, because he says...
Jessi: Ya sé dónde. Gracias.
Karen: “Now I know where, thank you.”
Jessi: Listeners, keep these words and phrases in mind. They’ll really help you out if you’re lost and trying to get somewhere.
Karen: Definitely. Okay, so Sergio found his way, it’s a happy ending. So, I think that’s going to do it for this lesson. Thanks everyone for listening, and don’t forget to pick up the lesson notes that go along with this lesson.
Jessi: You can find them on our site at www.spanishpod101.com.
Karen: Until next time.
Jessi: Adiós.

35 Comments

Hide
Please to leave a comment.
😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍
Sorry, please keep your comment under 800 characters. Got a complicated question? Try asking your teacher using My Teacher Messenger.
Sorry, please keep your comment under 800 characters.

SpanishPod101.com
Tuesday at 6:30 pm
Pinned Comment
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hola a todos!
Have you ever gotten lost when travelling in a Spanish speaking country? We hope the phrases in this lesson help you out in case you do (although we hope you don't! ;) )

SpanishPod101.comVerified
Sunday at 9:59 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hola John,


Thank you for leaving the comment!


If you have any questions, please let us know.


Saludos,

Cristiane

Team SpanishPod101.com

John Eiler
Friday at 3:44 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

I appreciate a break from Fernando and JP, no disrespect intended. The girls sound very to the point and professional.

SpanishPod101.comVerified
Wednesday at 11:21 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Alvina,


Thanks for your feedback! Let us know if you have any questions.


Cheers,


Khanh

Team SpanishPod101.com

Alvina
Saturday at 1:00 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

I liked Fernando and JP! Their lessons sounded more natural and less forced.

SpanishPod101.comVerified
Friday at 8:38 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hola Alex,


They are using "izquierda" as a noun, this is why is feminine.:thumbsup:


Saludos,

Carla

Team SpanishPod101.com

Alex
Sunday at 4:25 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Shouldn't it be "izquierdo" instead of "izquierda" because the student is talking to a man (Sergio)?

Spanishpod101.comVerified
Monday at 11:30 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hola Dilara,


Thank you for your comment!

Fernando and JP will appreciate that.


Saludos,

Carla

Team SpanishPod101.com

Spanishpod101.comVerified
Saturday at 1:05 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hola Esteban,


Thank you for your comment!

We usually say "un poco", we don't use "una poca" for saying "a little"


Saludos,

Carla

Team SpanishPod101.com

Dilara Peker
Friday at 10:57 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

I am gonna miss Fernando and JP :smile:

Esteban
Monday at 12:27 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

One of the example sentences is

Esta película está un poco aburrida


Why isn't it

Esta película está una poca aburrida