Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Fernando: Welcome everyone. This is Absolute Beginner Season 1, Lesson 17. Tell me how much you like my car, in Spanish. JP, do you own a car?
JP: I don’t Fernando, but if I did, I would like you to tell how much you liked it.
Fernando: I’ll try and do that.
JP: Okay. Welcome everyone to the new SpanishPod101.com. We are studying modern Spanish in a fun and educational format. So, whether you’re brushing up on the Spanish that you started learning long ago or you’re starting with us today. We are glad that you’re here for this lesson. Fernando, tell us what we’re going to talk about.
Fernando: In this lesson, you will learn about possessive adjectives. This conversation takes place at school. The conversation is between Andrea and Jorge. And the speakers will be using the familiar register.
JP: Let’s listen to this dialog.

Lesson conversation

Jorge: Elena está enojada conmigo.
Andrea: ¿Qué pasó?
Jorge: Me comí su sandwich.
Andrea: ¡Con razón!
JP: Let’s hear it again, dramatic speed.
Jorge: Elena está enojada conmigo.
Andrea: ¿Qué pasó?
Jorge: Me comí su sandwich.
Andrea: ¡Con razón!
JP: One more time with the translation.
Jorge: Elena está enojada conmigo.
JP: Elena’s mad at me.
Andrea: ¿Qué pasó?
Fernando: What happened?
Jorge: Me comí su sandwich.
JP: I ate her sandwich.
Andrea: ¡Con razón!
Fernando: No wonder.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
JP: All right, Fernando. We’re back and this dialog cracks me up.
Fernando: It’s a little pubescent I would say.
JP: Yeah. It actually kind of hits close to home for me.
Fernando: What? Okay.
JP: Yeah, sometimes I get in trouble because I eat people’s sandwich. Anyway, Jorje complains that Elena is mad at him.
Fernando: Elena está enojada conmigo.
JP: Elena está enojada conmigo. So of course, the first word in the sentence is Elena.
Fernando: Elena.
JP: Elena is mad.
Fernando: ...está enojada.
JP: Está enojada, now that’s two words. “Está” is the word for “is” in this case. And the word for “mad”?
Fernando: enojada
JP: Enojada, Jorge says that she’s mad at me.
Fernando: conmigo
JP: Conmigo, okay, this is one word and it means with me. Elena is angry with me. Elena está enojada conmigo.
Fernando: Andrea asks ¿Qué pasó?
JP: What happened? This word ¿Qué? means, “what?” and, pasó, literally means “happened.” ¿Qué pasó?
Fernando: ¿Qué pasó? of the verb: pasar.
JP: This is actually a very common question and we’ll talk about it a little more in the vocabulary section. For now, Jorge is going to tell Andrea exactly what happened.
Fernando: He must be very hungry. Me comí su sandwich.
JP: Oh, no. Me comí su sandwich. Let’s start at the end of the sentence. What’s the word for “sandwich”?
Fernando: Sandwich.
JP: Sandwich. How do you pronounce it Spanish?
Fernando: sandwich
JP: Sandwich, okay. To say, it’s her sandwich.
Fernando: Su sandwich.
JP: Su sandwich. That “su” means “her”. Su sandwich, now Jorge actually says, “I ate it”.
Fernando: Me comí
JP: Now this is the verb “comer” and it’s in the past tense: comí, and he’s doing a little thing with the pronoun here: Me comí su sandwich. I ate up her sandwich, I took it. It wasn’t his to eat, but he kind of took it. So Andreas says, no wonder she’s mad at you.
Fernando: No wonder, ¡Con razón!
JP: ¡Con razón!, con razón, is an expression that means, “No wonder.”
Fernando: Like, duh.
JP: All right. Let’s take a look at the vocabulary.
VOCAB LIST
Fernando: enojado
JP: Angry.
Fernando: eno-ja-do, enojado. ¿Qué pasó?
JP: What happened?
Fernando: ¿Qué pa-só?, ¿Qué pasó? ¡Con razón!
JP: No wonder.
Fernando: ¡Con ra-zón!, ¡Con razón! El sandwich.
JP: Sandwich.
Fernando: el sand-wich, el sandwich
KEY VOCABULARY AND PHRASES
JP: All right we’re back. Let’s take a closer look at some of these words.
Fernando: Let’s start with: enojado.
JP: We said that it means angry and we use it with: estar, right? Estar enojado. If it’s a woman like Elena, está enojada, she’s angry. That’s the feminine form, enojada.
Fernando: If Jorge is upset.
JP: We’ll say: enojado.
Fernando: Está enojado.
JP: Está enojado, this adjective is actually related to the verb “enojar” which means, “to get angry.”
Fernando: ¿Qué pasó?
JP: This is a common question if you want to know what happened in Spanish you say ¿Qué pasó?
Fernando: ¿Qué pasó?
JP: What happened?
Fernando: Or you can also use it to say, hey!, ¿Qué pasó?
JP: Hey!, what happened? It’s like it’s a greeting.
Fernando: Yeah. ¿Qué pasó?, what’s up?
JP: All right. What’s the next word.
Fernando: El sandwich
JP: El sandwich, now it’s not exactly sandwich. So when you’re speaking Spanish you don’t have to switch into sandwich, Me comí su “sandwich”.
Fernando: sandwich
JP: Sandwich, right? There’s kind of a little “N-G” in there. Sandwich.
Fernando: You can also say: emparedado.
JP: Emparedado, is another word for sandwich. Also, torta, is a sandwich that’s on a role.
Fernando: Um-hmm.
JP: Right. Because, sandwich, when you think of sandwich it’s usually on like sliced bread.
Fernando: Like loaf.
JP: From a loaf.
Fernando: Yeah.
JP: Exactly. There’s other kinds of sandwiches like, bocadillo, that’s if you use a baguette.
Fernando: The last word, ¡con razón!
JP: No wonder. Okay, so when you realize, when you finally realize what happened, you say this ¡Con razón!
Fernando: Never to be translated to: with reason.
JP: No, no, no, no. No wonder.

Lesson focus

Fernando: We’re talking about possessive adjectives in this grammar point I believe.
JP: That’s right, because Jorge says, “I ate her sandwich.”
Fernando: Terrible, terrible, Jorge.
JP: Me comí su sandwich.
Fernando: Me comí su sandwich.
JP: Exactly. That “su” is the possessive adjective. In this sentence it means her, as in her sandwich. I ate the sandwich that belongs to her. So let’s talk just a little bit about these possessive adjectives. Now, it might help to know a formula. So if you can fill in the blank with a pronoun, it’s going to be a possessive adjective and the blank is I ate blank sandwich. All right? So let’s try some pronouns. I ate my sandwich. That “my” is a possessive adjective in English. I ate your sandwich. That “your” is a possessive adjective. His sandwich, her sandwich, our sandwich, their sandwich, shoot we can even talk about sandwiches in English, there’s so many things we can do.
Fernando: With sandwiches, we can do a lot of stuff with sandwiches.
JP: Exactly. Hey, let’s talk about possessive adjectives in Spanish though.
Fernando: Let’s do that.
JP: Okay. So her sandwich?
Fernando: Su sandwich.
JP: Su sandwich. How about my sandwich?
Fernando: Mi sandwich.
JP: Mi sandwich. How about, your sandwich?
Fernando: Tu sandwich.
JP: Tu sandwich. So, mi sandwich, tu sandwich, su sandwich. If it’s our sandwich?
Fernando: Nuestro sandwich.
JP: Nuestro sandwich. How about your sandwich, you all’s sandwich.
Fernando: Su sandwich.
JP: It’s the same as a singular.
Fernando: Um-hmm.
JP: Okay. Now we’re going to talk about that in a second. And their sandwich?
Fernando: Su sandwich.
JP: Su sandwich, also. Okay, piece of cake.
Fernando: It’s actually sandwich JP.
JP: Oh, not a cake. All right. Mi sandwich, tu sandwich, su sandwich, nuestro sandwich. In Spain you can say, vuestro sandwich, and su sandwich.
Fernando: Sí, todo eso.
JP: All of those things. Now that’s if we’re talking about one sandwich. The tricky thing about possessive adjectives in Spanish is that they behave like other adjectives. That is, they reflect the person and number of the object they’re modifying. And since the sandwich is masculine singular, we’re using the masculine singular. What if we talked about plural sandwiches? My sandwiches, Fernando.
Fernando: Mis sandwiches.
JP: Mis sandwiches. There’s only one of me but there’s plural sandwiches and we’re going to say, mis sandwiches. Your sandwiches?
Fernando: Tus sandwiches.
JP: Tus sandwiches. His sandwiches or her sandwiches?
Fernando: Sus sandwiches.
JP: Sus… so the moral of the story is that these possessive adjectives have plural forms. They also have feminine forms. So if I say, “our house.”
Fernando: Nuestra casa.
JP: Nuestra casa. That’s different from our sandwich.
Fernando: Nuestro sandwich.
JP: Nuestro sandwich, that nuestrO ended with an “O”. Nuestra casa, that nuestrA ended with an “A”.
Fernando: Now if you were a gazillionaire, you’re have more than one house.
JP: Oh, feminine plural.
Fernando: How do you say that? Our houses.
JP: Nuestras casas.
Fernando: Go.
Male: Okay, feminine plural. Now it seems like we’re throwing a lot of information at you right now, so please do take a look at the grammar notes that are attached to this lesson. You can go to our website, www.SpanishPod101.com and see the whole thing laid out very nicely for you to assimilate.
Fernando: And once you get to see that, hopefully we’ll get to see your comments in the comments section as well because we want to hear from you.
JP: Absolutely. For now though, it’s time to go. So, hasta luego.
Fernando: Adiós.

62 Comments

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SpanishPod101.comVerified
Wednesday at 6:30 pm
Pinned Comment
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Do you ever steal your friend's lunches?

SpanishPod101.com
Sunday at 1:44 am
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Hola Sarah,


Thank you for your comment.

Both mean the same, but you would usually say "me comí su sandiwch" is to emphasize you did it and when we talk we usually do this unintentionally.

Sigamos practicando!


Saludos,

Carla

Team SpanishPod101.com

Sarah Bass
Wednesday at 6:10 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hola,


First of all, thank you for these podcasts. They are interesting and engaging! I enjoy listening to the banter between Fernando and JP.


I do, however, have a question. I see Hai Bui's comment and mine's related. How does one know when to use a regular verb and when to make it reflexive? In the dialogue, the character says, "Me comi su sandwich". Why that vs. "Comi su sandwich"? Is there an easy way to know when to use the two and when not to? When should something be emphasized?


Muchas gracias!

SpanishPod101.com
Monday at 7:42 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hola Hatim,


We're glad to hear that you liked the lesson.


We hope you'll enjoy the rest as well!


Saludos,

Cristiane

Team SpanishPod101.com

hatim
Monday at 1:54 pm
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Hola

I Love it

SpanishPod101.com
Friday at 10:19 am
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Hola Hai Bui,


Thank you for your questions.

"me" is used to emphasize you're eating someone else's sandwich.

About "nuestro casa" its should be "nuestra casa" since casa is a feminine noun.

Sigamos practicando!


Saludos,

Carla

Team SpanishPod101.com

Hai Bui
Thursday at 6:39 pm
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It made me a little confused here.

Is it OK to say "yo como su sandwich"? or I need to add "me" to the sentence? "Yo me como su sandwich"?


Also, what will happen if I say "nuestro casa"??? Can the sentence be understood in another meaning? or people just know that it's just a mistake?

SpanishPod101.comVerified
Monday at 3:53 am
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Hola Hilda,


Thank you for your question.

They are examples of possessions.

Mi sandwich / Mi carro


Sigamos practicando!


Saludos,

Carla

Team SpanishPod101.com

Hilda
Saturday at 10:51 pm
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What do sandwich and car have in common?

SpanishPod101.comVerified
Monday at 2:56 am
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Hola Alvina,


Thank you for your comment.

"Yo" is a subject pronoun - it used when "I" is the subject (actor) of the sentence, as in this case.

"Me" is an object pronoun, used when "I/me" is the direct or indirect object (person to whom the action is being done). ... (Yo) me baño -- I wash myself (me is a reflexive object pronoun here).

Sigamos practicando!


Saludos,

Carla

Team SpanishPod101.com

SpanishPod101.comVerified
Sunday at 3:37 pm
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Hola Kjell,


Thank you for your comment.

haha que graciso! Asi pasa con otas palabras.

Como burro en italiano.

Sigamospracticando!


Saludos,

Carla

Team SpanishPod101.com