Dialogue

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Beatriz: Buen día, soy Bea.
Joseph: What’s going on? Joseph here. Peruvian Spanish Series, Lesson 30 – “And what’s worse, with my sister!”
Beatriz: Bienvenidos.
Joseph: ¿Qué tal todos? Bea and Joseph back again for another edition of the Peruvian Spanish Series, coming to you on demand from Spanishpod101.com.
Beatriz: Transmitiendo desde Lima, Perú.
Joseph: That’s right! We are on location here in Lima. So, sync up your IPods, plug in those headphones, download the PDF and pump up the volume. Lesson #30 is on its way.
Beatriz: Hola amigos. ¿Cómo están?
Joseph: ¿Qué tal todos? ¿Beatriz, cómo te va a ti?
Beatriz: Estoy super super contenta. Acá nos están riendo hasta decir basta.
Joseph: Basta.
Beatriz: Cada día es un agasajo, encontrarse con amigos, salir, comer… No se...
Joseph: Comer, salir, comer...
Beatriz: Una fiesta. Cada día acá en Lima
Joseph: Claro. Bea, we are on Lesson 30. Can you believe it?
Beatriz: Somos un buen equipo, Joseph.
Joseph: So, Bea, what, may I ask, is today’s lesson about?
Beatriz: It’s about “el engaño”.
Joseph: “El engaño”, “cheating”.
Beatriz: Yes!
Joseph: So, this should be interesting to see how this unfolds in Peruvian Spanish. Now, Bea, what did we look at last time?
Beatriz: We talked about unmarried couples spending the night together.
Joseph: Ay ay ay, otro tabú.
Beatriz: Yes! Tabú. Buu.
Joseph: Oh my gosh! Now, today we’re going to look at a really great expression used to talk about cheating on someone, using the verb “poner”.
Beatriz: ¿Nada más?
Joseph: Claro, espera, aguanta. Caramba.
Beatriz: Oye, no sea faltoso.
Joseph: Well, we’re also going to look at some really strong words “caradura” and “sinvergüenza”.
Beatriz: Caradura
Joseph: Caradura
Beatriz: Sinvergüenza.
Joseph: That’s right, that’s right! Oh, come on! Come on! All right! Well, before I say something that shouldn’t be recorded, Beatrice, this Eduardo, I don’t know about him. It looks like he’s been cheating on Cristina.
Beatriz: Se está pasando de vivo o de tarada, mejor dicho.
Joseph: Anda. Well, Bea, we’ve got a lot to cover here. But before we jump in, guys, remember that this lesson references Newbie Lesson 30 and the 30th lesson of the Iberian and Costa Rican Series. So, check those out. Compare, contrast and broad in your understanding of this living and breeding language that Spanish is.
Beatriz: And now, let’s go into today’s conversation.
Joseph: Alright! As is our custom here, in the Regional Series, we always start out by going back to a Newbie Lesson, listening to that conversation and then comparing it to Peruvian Spanish. So, today we’re going back to Newbie Lesson 30. Follow along on your PDFs and recall with us the conversation from that lesson. Here we go!
DIALOGUE - NORMAL
JULIA: ¿¡Ramón, me estás sacando la vuelta!?
RAMÓN: ¿De qué hablas, mi vida, mi amor, luz de mi vida?
JULIA: ¡Dejó su lápiz de labios en el baño, mentiroso!
RAMÓN: Amor, espera...
JULIA: No me digas amor. ¡Ya no!
RAMÓN: ¿Julia, me puedes perdonar?
Joseph: And now with the translation! Ahora incluiremos la traducción.
JULIA: ¿¡Ramón, me estás sacando la vuelta!?
JULIA: “Ramon, are you cheating on me?”
RAMÓN: ¿De qué hablas, mi vida, mi amor, luz de mi vida?
Joseph: “What are you talking about, honey, baby, light of my life?”
JULIA: ¡Dejó su lápiz de labios en el baño, mentiroso!
JULIA: “She left her lipstick in the bathroom, you liar!”
RAMÓN: Amor, espera...
Joseph: “Baby, wait!”
JULIA: No me digas amor. ¡Ya no!
JULIA: “Don’t call me baby, not anymore!”
RAMÓN: ¿Julia, me puedes perdonar?
Joseph: “Julia, can you forgive me?”
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Joseph: Ramon, come on! What are you doing, man? What are thinking? Julia has always been good to you. Man!
Beatriz: Jerk! Tarado.
Joseph: Wow! We should mention that that’s the standard version, right? The Spanish used in that version would be understood anywhere in the Spanish speaking world. And now, we’re going to change the sub and we’re going to look at how this might sound here in Lima, Peru.
DIALOGUE - PERUVIAN
VALENTINA: Dime de una vez, Federico, ¿me estás poniendo los cuernos?
FEDERICO: Debes estar enferma, amor. ¿Por qué no descansas?
VALENTINA: ¡Qué caradura tienes oye! ¡Y para colmo, con mi hermana!
FEDERICO: Amorcito, nada que ver. Es una mentira. Es que tu hermana está celosa de lo nuestro.
VALENTINA: Eres tan cínico que no lo puedo creer.
FEDERICO: ¿Me perdonarás algún día?
VALENTINA: ¡Sinvergüenza, sal de mi vista!
Joseph: And now slower! Una vez más, esta vez lentamente.
VALENTINA: Dime de una vez, Federico, ¿me estás poniendo los cuernos?
FEDERICO: Debes estar enferma, amor. ¿Por qué no descansas?
VALENTINA: ¡Qué caradura tienes oye! ¡Y para colmo, con mi hermana!
FEDERICO: Amorcito, nada que ver. Es una mentira. Es que tu hermana está celosa de lo nuestro.
VALENTINA: Eres tan cínico que no lo puedo creer.
FEDERICO: ¿Me perdonarás algún día?
VALENTINA: ¡Sinvergüenza, sal de mi vista!
Joseph: And now with the translation! Ahora incluiremos la traducción.
Beatriz: Dime de una vez, Federico, ¿me estás poniendo los cuernos? “Tell me right now, Federico, are you messing around?”
Joseph: Debes estar enferma, amor. ¿Por qué no descansas? “You must be sick, honey! Why don’t you rest?”
Beatriz: ¡Qué caradura tienes oye! ¡Y para colmo, con mi hermana! “You’ve got some nerve, boy! And what’s worse, with my sister!”
Joseph: Amorcito, nada que ver. Es una mentira. Es que tu hermana está celosa de lo nuestro. “Baby, it’s nothing! It’s a lie! The thing is that your sister is jealous of what we have.”
Beatriz: Eres tan cínico que no lo puedo creer. “You’re such a peek, I can’t believe it!”
Joseph: ¿Me perdonarás algún día? “Will you forgive me someday?”
Beatriz: ¡Sinvergüenza, sal de mi vista! “You good for nothing, get out of my sight!”
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Beatriz: It’s a good topic for Oprah, I think.
Joseph: Yes, maybe we could get Oprah to come in and arbitrate here. That could be good. We can get Ramon and Federico on the stage, one side of the stage, and Valentina and Julia and…
Beatriz: Like a boxer ring and its side?
Joseph: Yes, yes! Oprah, if you’re listening, you’re welcome to come on our show. All right! So, let’s compare these two conversations a little bit. And these are really funny situations. So, to begin, I think that we should look at how the concept of cheating was expressed in both. In Newbie Lesson 30, Julia asks:
JULIA: ¿¡Ramón, me estás sacando la vuelta!?
JULIA: “Ramon, are you cheating on me?”
Joseph: And in today’s Peruvian conversation, Valentina says “¿me estás poniendo los cuernos?”
Beatriz: Oh my gosh, yes!
Joseph: So, Bea, are both of these figurative or is one literal and the other figurative?
Beatriz: I think that both are very figurative.
Joseph: Okay, okay! So, they’re both figurative expressions, guys. The literal way to say “cheat” or “deceive” is “engañar”. So, in both of them, the question could’ve been phrased “¿me estás engañando?”.
Beatriz: Sería lo más universal decir: Me estás engañando. Por ejemplo, lo que se dice por ahí por la calle es “poner los cuernos”.
Joseph: Right! So, let’s get into that. “Poner los cuernos”, right? Again, in the Newbie Lesson they said “sacar la vuelta”, but today we heard “me estás poniendo los cuernos”. So, Bea, what are “cuernos”?
Beatriz: Son cachos.
Joseph: Cachos.
Beatriz: To remember, “una vaca”, “a cow”.
Joseph: A cow.
Beatriz: A cow or “un toro”.
Joseph: “Toro”, “a bull”.
Beatriz: A bull. You know what they have on the head.
Joseph: Right, they have horns.
Beatriz: Yes.
Joseph: Okay! So, “poner los cuernos”, so do you kind of get the image, like “poner” is “to put” “Are you putting your horns in me?”, like “Are you impaling me?”, “Are you cheating on me?” Ouch! What a strong image! We don’t…
Beatriz: Yes, very strong.
Joseph: You know, in English it’s like so many of the expressions for cheating have to do with like diversion or you’re having fun, you know? “Are you messing around?”
Beatriz: “Poner los cuernos” means a little bit like “tración”.
Joseph: How would you say “tración”? “Tración” is betrayal.
Beatriz: Yes, a little bit, right? No?
Joseph: Totally.
Beatriz: Like you’re cheating on me, I mean you’re “me estás engañando” like…
Joseph: Right! Sure, but look at the image. I mean, “cuernos”, you’re being impaled, it’s like “el toro te ganó”.
Beatriz: I was. Yes.
Joseph: So, another thing we should point out about these two phrases here, “me estás sacando la vuelta” and “me estás poniendo los cuernos”. In both we have the verb “estár”, conjugated in the second person singular of the Present Indicative, and then we have a Gerund; in the Newbie Lesson we have “sacando” and in today’s Peruvian conversation we have “poniendo”. Look at the placement of the pronoun. We put that before the verb “estár”, “me estás sacando” and “me estas poniendo.. Now, Beatrice, as a native speaker, would it sound strange to say “estás sacandome la vuelta”?
Beatriz: It’s not strange at all. It’s very common to hear it everywhere.
Joseph: Okay! So, you could say it that way also “estás sacandome la vuelta”. ¿Podrías decir “estás sacandome”?
Beatriz: Claro. Estás sacandome la vuelta.
Joseph: Igual se podría decir “Me estás poniendo los cuernos” o “estás poniéndome los cuernos”.
Beatriz: Claro, puedes decir “me estás poniendo los cuernos” o “estás poniéndome los cuernos”.
Joseph: So, just to recap, in Newbie Lesson 30, we heard:
JULIA: ¿¡Ramón, me estás sacando la vuelta!?
JULIA: “Ramon, are you cheating on me?”
Joseph: And in today’s Peruvian conversation, Valentina says: “Dime de una vez, Federico, ¿me estás poniendo los cuernos?” Okay! Moving on to the next comparison. Now, Bea, let’s look at how this “engaño” was revealed. In Newbie Lesson 30, Julia says:
JULIA: ¡Dejó su lapiz de labios en el baño, mentiroso!
JULIA: “She left her lipstick in the bathroom, you liar!”
Joseph: And in today’s Peruvian conversation, Julia says: “¡Qué caradura tienes oye! ¡Y para colmo, con mi hermana!”
Beatriz: Yes, that’s really tragic.
Joseph: This is tragic! This is really bad. Oh my God!
Beatriz: “Caradura” es una expresión muy figurativa y para mí realmente muy graciosa. It’s very figurative and very fun also.
Joseph: Yes, “caradura”. So, Bea, to translate this literally, well “cara” is “face” and “dura” is “tough” or “hard”, something like that. So, “caradura” it’s like, you know, a tough face, but don’t confuse it with thick skin, because thick skin is a little bit different, I think.
Beatriz: No, it’s more like “You shouldn’t show your face because you should be ashamed about this.”, you know?
Joseph: Right, right! So, that’s…
Beatriz: This is why you have to be “caradura” to show your face around…
Joseph: Right!
Beatriz: When you are a really bad person.
Joseph: Right! So, obviously, we can’t translate this literally or if we do, we’re going to be pretty mistaken. But you know, the way that we did translate it, “You’ve got some nerve, boy.” that’s pretty close to the concept, I mean, you know, if you look it up in a dictionary you may find something like “cheeky”. You know, in the States we wouldn’t say that. Maybe one of our European listeners will have a comment about that, I’m not quite sure how that’s used in the English that’s spoken in Europe, but in the States anyway, we would say “You’ve got some nerve.”
Beatriz: Así es mi amigo.
Joseph: Alright! And the other phrase that we should definitely talk about is “para colmo”. Julia says “¡Y para colmo, con mi hermana!”
Beatriz: Yes.
Joseph: Now, “para colmo” is kind of an interesting expression. Literally, it means “and on top of it”.
Beatriz: Yes, literally.
Joseph: But it’s kind of like saying “and what’s worse”.
Beatriz: Y lo peor de todo, ¿no?
Joseph: Right! Yes. “And what’s worse of all”. Couple of more things here to point out. The phrase “nada que ver”, right?
Beatriz: Okay!
Joseph: This is a good one. “Nada que ver. What does “nada que ver” mean?
Beatriz: “Nada que ver”...
Joseph: ¿Qué significa?
Beatriz: Realmente no significa mucho.
Joseph: Ay creo que sí, creo que sí significa algo.
Beatriz: Es una, es una… Significa-- Escucha pues. Significa pero es como una expresión para desaprobar.
Joseph: Para desaprobar.
Beatriz: Aja, así es.
Joseph: ¿En que contexto? In what context?
Beatriz: Esa actitud que no tiene nada que ver. Nada que ver. O si no, por ejemplo dice… Pero, ¿ay te vas a comprar esa blusa? Nada que ver, es horrible, ya pasó de moda.
Joseph: So, in that sense, yes. It is kind of like disapproval, I think that’s disapproval “desaprobación”.
Beatriz: Es una expresión para desaprobar.
Joseph: Okay! Moving on, we got two more words to cover before we go on to localisms here.
Beatriz: ¿Y lo de cínico, eso?
Joseph: A eso voy, a eso voy. ¡Caramba! Deja que hable pues. In another place in the conversation, Valentina says “Eres tan cínico que no lo puedo creer.”, right? And we translated that as “You’re such a pig that I can’t believe it!” Now, “cínico” is not literally a “pig”, we have to think of “pig” here in the sense of, you know, someone who doesn’t care about other people, someone who has, how should I say, low standards of moral conduct. But, this is a “falso amigo”, this is a false cognate, right? “Cínico” it can mean “cynical”, pero Beatriz ¿en qué contexto también podemos usar “cínico” ?
Beatriz: Bueno, se usa en más que todoen... cuando una persona no es totalmente falsa ¿no?
Joseph: Falsa.
Beatriz: Falsa. Supuestamente te dice la verdad. No, trata de que tú creas que es verdad pero realmente esta engañandote.
Joseph: That’s really interesting!
Beatriz: Y sí y sí….
Joseph: So, don’t be fooled into thinking that “cínico” only means “cynical”. It also means someone who’s a liar, someone who’s not trustworthy. And not only are they not trust worthy, but they’re going to tell you something false.
Beatriz: Yes.
Joseph: And they’re really going to try to take advantage of you.
Beatriz: No tienen vergüenza. Tambien va con eso. Por ejemplo, no voy a repetir el nombre del presidente pero es tan cínico de haberse presentarse de nuevo y haber sido electo.
Joseph: Yes, yo sí lo repito está hablando de, Allan Garcia, no? Y sí es un cínico.
Beatriz: Exacto.
Joseph: Okay, on to the localisms. Now, today we have a really interesting topic. A topic that’s probably going to make a bunch of people uncomfortable and well, we don’t mean to offend anyone. I think that this is a really interesting topic, so the topic of today is?
Beatriz: La lealtad.
Joseph: La lealtad en las relaciones latinoamericanas, específicamente en las del Perú.
Beatriz: Uy uy uy. ¿Estás tocando carne, verdad?
Joseph: I am, but this is a really, really interesting topic. I mean…
Beatriz: Yes, I know.
Joseph: There are a lot, there’re many relationships that you see in a country like Peru, in a city like Lima, where at late 30s, 40s, even 50s there is a moment where one of the partners in a couple decides to cheat on the other one.
Beatriz: Yes.
Joseph: Right?
Beatriz: That’s right.
Joseph: It’s very common.
Beatriz: I’m not thinking this only here, in Peru, as also in the States, right? A lot!
Joseph: Okay, okay! Sure, it happens in the States, too. Like let’s say it’s a guy. Let’s say that the guy cheats on his wife, and he’s with another woman, “con la otra, la otra”. It’s great! You don’t even have to say “la otra mujer”, that you don’t have to say “the other woman”, you just say “the other”, “la otra”. Let’s say that he’s with “la otra” and she gets pregnant.
Beatriz: La otra se embarazó.
Joseph: Right! La otra sale embarazada. Now, he’s not going to like, leave one family or the other. He doesn’t abandon them, but he ends up maintaining two families, and sometimes that means like, two households, you know, he might have two houses, am I off base here or what?
Beatriz: I think that used to happen much more before. Esta situación creo que es super super super super antigua ¿no? Y creo que sigue sucediendo pero creo que sucedió más antiguamente porque ahora las mujeres como que ya no aguantan tanto el engaño ¿no? Deciden separarse, right? Osea...
Joseph: Well, and it’s also hard to separate, I think, because of the church.
Beatriz: Oh my God! That’s a heavy, heavy topic.
Joseph: It is, it is. But I think it’s really interesting, I mean, you know, in some cases the father has abandoned the family, but in another cases he’s just not there, but he supports them.
Beatriz: Se encuentra familias que son disfuncionales, ¿no? Que son funcionales ¿no? Ósea y es super lindo.
Joseph: Ay claro, pero claro. No quiero decir eso, no estoy tratando de decir que todas las familias latinas tienen…
Beatriz: Esa disfuncionalidad.
OUTRO
Joseph: Right! No, I don’t mean to say that. Bueno, porque no preguntamos a los alumnos. Porque sabemos que hay muchos hispanohablantes, muchos latinos que nos escuchan cada día. So, what do you think? Do you think this is something that we can, you know, is this a custom that we can say is particular to Hispanic countries or is this something that just happens all over the world and we would be wrong to say is particular to Hispanic countries? So, let us know, drop us a comment. Well, Bea, that’s just about all the time we have for today.
Beatriz: Ahora amigos vamonos al foro.
Joseph: That’s right, guys! Would you like to continue this discussion and learn more about what we talked about here? Check out the forum at Spanishpod101.com. Also, be sure to check out the new features in the Learning Center. And if you don’t already have a premium membership, pick up a seven day free trial. See what’s it about and make the most out of this course. Remember, this is Spanish on demand.
Beatriz: We bring the Spanish speaking world to you.
Joseph: Alright! Beatrice, a sido un placer. Gracias por aguantarme. ¿No?

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Dialogue - Peruvian

Dialogue - Standard

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SpanishPod101.com
Saturday at 6:30 pm
Pinned Comment
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Thanks to Kevin Macleod for the music used here. Remember that the placement of indirect object pronouns can vary. Are there any questions on the grammar point? Try out some practice sentences here or in the forum for feedback.

steven
Sunday at 9:47 am
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From the Peruvian line- by-line audio:


VALENTINA: Qué caradura tienes oye! ¡Y para colmo, con mi hermana!


To me it sounds like she says "Qué caradura eres oye!"

Kayla
Tuesday at 4:19 am
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Ok, thanks!

SpanishPod101.comVerified
Monday at 2:19 pm
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Hello Kayla!


Thanks for your question, we love to have people asking and wanting to know more. Here is the answer

"y para colmo" meaning, "to make it even worst"

"tarado" means "stupid" or "dumb" but if it is used with an aggressive inflection it gives more the idea of "cretin" or "moron"

and finally "estás tocando carne" literally means "you are touching meat", but is used as a regionalism to mean, "you are touching a sensitive point".


Hope this helps

Keep posting

~fer

Kayla
Friday at 3:01 am
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cómo se escribe esa frase la q en inglés le tradujieron a what's worse? para conmo?

y qué significa tarado y estás tocando carne? tengo una idea de lo que significan pero no sé exactamente.