Dialogue

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Beatriz: Buen día soy Bea.
Joseph: Soy Joseph. Peruvian Spanish Series, Lesson 27 – “Dumping Federico”
Beatriz: Hey, guys! How is it going?
Joseph: Bea and Joseph back again for another episode of the Peruvian Spanish Series.
Beatriz: Coming to you on demand from Spanishpod101.com
Joseph: Hoy día amigos, tenemos la vigésima séptima lección del ciclo peruano. Number 27.
Beatriz: And this references the 27th lesson of the Newbie Series which you can also check out free at Spanishpod101.com
Joseph: So, Bea, refresh my memory. What did we look at last time?
Beatriz: Well, we had a look at “piropos”.
Joseph: “Piropos”. Right! The pickup lines. Well, today’s conversation, in contrast, is all about “rupturas”. Breakups!
Beatriz: Oh my God! Is there a grammar topic that we have in the store today?
Joseph: Well, we’re going to cover a few different points: how to use the verb “ir”, the preposition “a” and any verb in the Infinitive to express a future action. Also, how to form the command “olvidate de mi”. “Forget about me!” and we’ll also take a sneak peak at a new way to express hypothetical actions.
Beatriz: All of these in one lesson?
Joseph: No te preocupes, amiga mia. Don’t worry! We’re going to focus on the lesson conversation, we’re going to listen to it a couple of times, learn some vocabulary and before you know it, we’ll be able to understand how the same situation, a breakup, could take place in Lima.
Beatriz: That’s more like it!
Joseph: So, before we get into the conversation, remember: if you’re downloading this podcast through ITunes and don’t already have a premium subscription, there’s a limited number of lessons made available to you. So, pick up a seven day free trial and browse through our 200+ lessons today.
Beatriz: Alright! Let’s begin with the conversation from Newbie Lesson 27. This is what we heard.
DIALOGUE - NORMAL
RAMÓN: ¿Por qué nunca me das la oportunidad de mostrarte el amor que tengo por ti?
ELIANA: ¡Ramón, no te puedo amar!
RAMÓN: ¡No puede ser! ¡Mi vida! ¡No...! ¿¡Por qué!?
ELIANA: Porque amo a Ernesto
RAMÓN: ¡Ese desgraciado! ¿¡Cómo me vas a decir eso!?
ELIANA: ¡Ay, Ramón, no hagas eso!
Joseph: And now with the translation! Ahora incluiremos la traducción.
RAMÓN: ¿Por qué nunca me das la oportunidad de mostrarte el amor que tengo por ti?
RAMÓN: “Why don’t you ever give me a chance to show you the love I have for you?”
ELIANA: ¡Ramón, no te puedo amar!
ELIANA: “Ramon, I can’t love you!”
RAMÓN: ¡No puede ser! ¡Mi vida! ¡No...! ¿¡Por qué!?
RAMÓN: “Impossible, my love! No! Why?”
ELIANA: Porque amo a Ernesto
ELIANA: “Because I love Ernesto.”
RAMÓN: ¡Ese desgraciado! ¿¡Cómo me vas a decir eso!?
RAMÓN: “That scum! How are you going to say that to me?”
ELIANA: ¡Ay, Ramón, no hagas eso!
ELIANA: “Oh, Ramon, don’t do that!”
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Joseph: You, Latinos, and your drama! Come on! What’s with that?
Beatriz: Come on, Jo! ¿Qué te pasa oye?
Joseph: No, you got to make a big deal out of everything, like if it’s over, it’s over. Chill out! You know, you’ll find someone else.
Beatriz: It’s just that we don’t have that icy cold blood in our veins.
Joseph: Okay!
Beatriz: We are passionate people.
Joseph: Okay! Well, in any case, that was the conversation from Newbie Lesson 27, the standard version. Now, let’s hear how this would sound in Lima, Peru.
DIALOGUE - PERUVIAN
FEDERICO: Ara, déjame darte mi cariño.
ARACELI: No, Federico, ya no. Todo ha terminado.
FEDERICO: ¿Pero de qué estás hablando?
ARACELI: Amo a Humberto.
FEDERICO: ¿¡Estás loca!? ¿¡Ese pituco de tu facultad!?
ARACELI: ¡Si vas a hablar de él así, pues olvídate de mí!
FEDERICO: Sólo si lo pudiera, pero no puedo.
Joseph: And now slower! Una vez más, esta vez lentamente.
FEDERICO: Ara, déjame darte mi cariño.
ARACELI: No, Federico, ya no. Todo ha terminado.
FEDERICO: ¿Pero de qué estás hablando?
ARACELI: Amo a Humberto.
FEDERICO: ¿¡Estás loca!? ¿¡Ese pituco de tu facultad!?
ARACELI: ¡Si vas a hablar de él así, pues olvídate de mí!
FEDERICO: Sólo si lo pudiera, pero no puedo.
Joseph: And now with the translation! Ahora incluirmeos la traducción.
Joseph: FEDERICO: Ara, déjame darte mi cariño.
ARACELI: No, Federico, ya no. Todo ha terminado.
FEDERICO: ¿Pero de qué estás hablando?
ARACELI: Amo a Humberto.
FEDERICO: ¿¡Estás loca!? ¿¡Ese pituco de tu facultad!?
ARACELI: ¡Si vas a hablar de él así, pues olvídate de mí!
FEDERICO: Sólo si lo pudiera, pero no puedo. “Ara, let me give you my love!”
Beatriz: No, Federico, ya no. Todo ha terminado. “No, Federico, not anymore! It’s all over!”
Joseph: ¿Pero de qué estás hablando? “What are you talking about?”
Beatriz: Amo a Humberto. “I’m in love with Humberto!”
Joseph: ¿¡Estás loca!? ¿¡Ese pituco de tu facultad!? “Are you crazy? That snob from your department?”
Beatriz: ¡Si vas a hablar de él así, pues olvídate de mí! “If you’re going to talk about him like that, then forget about me!”
Joseph: Sólo si lo pudiera, pero no puedo. “If only I could, but I can’t!”
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Joseph: Jesus! ¡Qué tal!
Beatriz: Yes, oh my God!
Joseph: What drama!
Beatriz: Yes!
Joseph: ¡Ufala!
Beatriz: ¿Qué tal drama? Esto me recuerda a las telenovelas.
Joseph: Yes, this is the stuff that soaps are made off.
Beatriz: Oye oye, no hables así tan mal de las telenovelas.
Joseph: Oye pero no hablo mal. Tú sabes como son, son completamente melodramáticas.
Beatriz: I know, I know! It’s just a joke. It’s only that some are good.
Joseph: I know, I know! The Brazilian ones, right?
Beatriz: Yes!
Joseph: Everyone agrees that Brazilian soaps, all right! You know, for me this is kind of hard to wrap my head around. One thing that I have noticed about “telenovelas”, which I find to be kind of interesting, is that they actually are “novelas”, I mean they’re kind of like short stories that run for a few months at a time and then they stop, but they’re not like those sagas that pretend to be a real time parallel universe.
Beatriz: Bueno, empecemos la comparación.
Joseph: Me parece bien. Que tal si empezamos con el primer verso. In Newbie Lesson 27, Ramon says:
RAMÓN: ¿Por qué nunca me das la oportunidad de mostrarte el amor que tengo por ti?
RAMON: “Why don’t you ever give me a chance to show you the love I have for you?”
Joseph: And in today’s Peruvian conversation Federico says “Ara, déjame darte mi cariño.” “Let me give you my love!”
Beatriz: They sound kind of needy.
Joseph: Oh, come on! They’re both just trying to show their significant others they love, you can’t blame them for that.
Beatriz: Okay! And how is this expressed in the Newbie conversation?
Joseph: Well, Ramon uses the word “amor”, which means “love”.
Beatriz: Okay! All right! But in the Peruvian conversation, Federico used the word “cariño”.
Joseph: Right! And this is kind of like a blanket term for “sweetheart” when it’s used as a form of address, but here, it’s a noun “el cariño” and with the possessive adjective “mi cariño” “my love”.
Beatriz: Yes, “my love” cariño mio, cariño bueno, cariño malo.
Joseph: Sure, sure! And in this case it’s the object.
Beatriz: Yes!
Joseph: Porque quiere darle “el cariño”, right? He wants to give it to her, he wants to show her.
Beatriz: Yes! I think that the word “cariño” is a little more like affection than love.
Joseph: Yes, that’s a tough one, that’s a good way to think about it, though. I’d say that definitely carried those connotations, like if you “dar cariño” it’s not so much like you’re giving love, but that you’re showing affection.
Beatriz: Yes, I think that it’s more common to say “cariño” and to use the word “cariño” for everything or “cariñito mio, cariñito bueno”... I don’t know, to give kisses when you go to a house to someone, to hug someone.
Joseph: Sure! And you can also say “te tengo mucho cariño”.
Beatriz: Yes, “te tengo mucho cariño”.
Joseph: Right?
Beatriz: Yes!
Joseph: This is a great expression, that’s like, literally, I mean “I have a lot of love for them.”, but it means that you have a special relationship with them really, you’re close to them.
Beatriz: Yes! Yes, and you know, it’s, you know, all this affection at the end means “love”, right?
Joseph: Right!
Beatriz: But it’s a little bit like how people are. So, to recap, in Newbie Lesson 27:
RAMÓN: ¿Por qué nunca me das la oportunidad de mostrarte el amor que tengo por ti?
RAMON: “Why don’t you ever give me a chance to show you the love I have for you?”
Joseph: And in today’s Peruvian version “Ara, déjame darte mi cariño.” “Ara, let me give you my love.”
Beatriz: Okay! Next up, Ramon and Federico’s response to the bad news.
Joseph: Right! These two kind of react differently upon finding out that their relations have come to an end. Ramon says:
RAMON: ¡Ese desgraciado! ¿¡Cómo me vas a decir eso!?
RAMON: “That scum! How are you going to say that to me?”
Beatriz: Someone is in denial.
Joseph: Right! Ramon is not willing to accept this. He calls Ernesto “un desgraciado” “a scum”. And then he exclaims in disbelief “¿¡Cómo me vas a decir eso!?”
Beatriz: But in the Peruvian version, Federico’s response is almost more aggressive, he says “¿¡Estás loca!? ¿¡Ese pituco de tu facultad!?”
Joseph: “Are you crazy? That snob from your department?” So, Bea, in your opinion, what make this response more aggressive?
Beatriz: Well, if you call someone “loco” or “loca” in a situation like this, you’re pretty much saying that you don’t care if you get back together. I think he’s getting blinded of jealousy.
Joseph: Right, right! He’s blinded with jealousy, I see that.
Beatriz: People sometime say the word that didn’t want to say because they are so angry, right?
Joseph: That’s right! So, that’s interesting to know about “loco”, that point you make there, because this is one of the Spanish words which gets used a lot in English and probably misused a lot when we’re using it English also. So, it seems to me like the connotations are heavier in Spanish than they are in English, no?
Beatriz: Yes, I think you’re right.
Joseph: So, now we stumble on to the word “pituco”.
Beatriz: This is not a very nice word.
Joseph: Ye, we definitely want to be careful when we use this one. In fact, it’s probably a word that you would hear more than you would say.
Beatriz: Yes, definitely, because you don’t say directly to someone “You’re a “pituco”. “Eres un pituco.” “You’re a snobby.”
Joseph: What is that? Yes, what I “pituco”? How would you define it?
Beatriz: It’s “snobbish” or “snobby”.
Joseph: Or snobby, right.
Beatriz: Snobby, yes. There is this “insulto” insult, this is a kind of insult there is behind that you don’t say it, you don’t direct to someone.
Joseph: Right, right! So, it is a word that you’ll hear in Lima, it’s not a very nice word and it’s kind of a word that shows some of the friction that exists between some of the social classes there, just like it happens in any country.
Beatriz: Yes. All right! Let’s move on! Ahora prosigamos a los localismos.
Joseph: So, today we’re talking about “una ruptura” “a breakup”.
Beatriz: Or “un rompimiento”.
Joseph: The breaking off of a relationship. So, in the context of our conversation, Federico calls Aracelli’s new love “un pituco” “a snob”. And, Bea, how does she respond to this?
Beatriz: She says “¡Si vas a hablar de él así, pues olvídate de mí!”
Joseph: So, let’s break this down into two parts. First part “Si vas a hablar de él así”. Bea, what are the verbs in this phrase?
Beatriz: There are “vas” and “hablar”.
Joseph: Right! And we’ve seen this construction in other lessons here at Spanishpod101. And we’ve also learned that we can use the Present Tense form of the verb “ir” “to go”, then the preposition “a” and then any verb in the Infinitive in order to express a future action.
Beatriz: Vas a hablar.
Joseph: “You’re going to speak” But in the example we also have the word “si” without an accent, which means “if”. So, “si vas a hablar” “if you’re going to speak”.
Beatriz: And then the phrase “de él”.
Joseph: Right! And that just means “about him” or “of him”. So, “si vas a hablar de él así “If you’re going to talk about him like that”…
Beatriz: “pues olvídate de mí”
Joseph: That’s a zinger. So, what’s the verb here?
Beatriz: “olvidar”
Joseph: “Olvidar”, right. And when it’s in this form “olvídate” is it a statement or a command?
Beatriz: Es un mandato, mi amigo.
Joseph: Okay, a command. Olvídate. And what does the verb “olvidar” mean?
Beatriz: It means “to forget”.
Joseph: And as a command, “olvídate”.
Beatriz: This time it means “Forget about me!”
Joseph: Ouch! Not the kind of thing that you want to hear, guys. And so, how does Federico respond to this?
Beatriz: He says “Sólo si lo pudiera, pero no puedo.”
Joseph: Oh, man! These two are not trying to work very hard to solve their problems, are they?
Beatriz: No! It’s horrible!
Joseph: Es terrible, qué feo. So, this means “If only I could, but I can’t.” If the verb “pudiera” looks unfamiliar, let this be a little a introduction to one of the ways of expressing hypothetical actions in Spanish.
Beatriz: What’s the name of this tense?
Joseph: Well, it’s called the Imperfect Tense.
Beatriz: And the mood?
Joseph: Well, that’s the thing. It’s in the Subjunctive Mood, which we often use to express that something would happen, if something else were to take place.
Beatriz: Claro, por ejemplo: Si pudiera olvidarte, lo haría.
Joseph: “If I were able to forget you, I would.”
OUTRO
Beatriz: This is a really great topic, but there’s a lot to it, so let’s pick up again on it in the future.
Joseph: Right on!
Beatriz: Okay! This is where we’ll stop for today.
Joseph: And right where you Tarea starts, that’s right, your assignment, today’s task “Use the verb “ir”, the preposition “a” and any verb in the Infinitive when you’re talking to someone in Spanish.” If you don’t have someone right around you with whom you can speak, come on to our webpage Spanishpod101.com, post a comment, do it in the forum, someone will get back to you.
Beatriz: Or just come to the website Spanishpod101.com and ask us a question.
Joseph: Also, catch the panorama of “castellano” with the Iberian and Costa Rican Series. Muchos saludos a Megan Sitron, David Perez, Natalia Raya y Carlos Acebedo.

Grammar

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Dialogue - Peruvian

Dialogue - Standard

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SpanishPod101.com
Saturday at 6:30 pm
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Thanks to Kevin Macleod for the music in today's lesson. Remember that reflexive verbs must retain the personal pronoun, even when giving commands. Why you ask? Because...without the personal pronoun, the meaning changes.

steven
Thursday at 4:15 am
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In the following example from the expanded vocab, the example sentence does not use the vocab word.


melodramático, -a melodramatic

Sólo quiero olvidarme de tí.

"I just want to forget about you."

Carlos
Sunday at 1:39 am
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How does the meaning change? Do you have an example?