Dialogue

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Megan: ¡Bienvenidos a Spanishpod101.com!
David: ¡Buenos días! Me llamo David.
Megan: And I’m Megan. Iberian Spanish Series, Lesson 24.
David: “¿Entienden todos inglés?”
Megan: Hi and welcome to Spanishpod101.com. My name is Megan and I’m joined here by David.
David: Hola, Megan. Bueno, ¿cómo va todo? How is everything going on?
Megan: ¡Bueno...! Great! Did I tell you I finished my exams, at least for this semester?
David: Well, I think only “cien veces”.
Megan: ¿Sí? One hundred times? Well, yes. I guess, maybe, I’m “una pesada”, huh?
David: Not so much. Today we have the 24th lesson of the Iberian Spanish Series.
Megan: Here we’ll cover the pronunciation and intonation of Spanish, as it’s spoken in Spain, in particularly here, in the capital city of Madrid.
David: And we compare Iberian speech to the standard Spanish which is taught in the core curriculum of Spanishpod101 and this way we give you the insider’s perspective on Iberian Spanish.
Megan: And we try to put it in the context for you by explaining Iberian customs.
David: So, come on! Join us for this lesson of Spanishpod101.com!
Megan: Last time we talked about the verb “poder”, “to be able to.”
David: And today’s lesson references Newbie Lesson 24 – “Can you all understand English?”, so be sure to check that out on our website.
Megan: Also in this lesson will look at when to use the “futuro de intención”.
David: And check out the transcripts and translations in the PDF for this lesson at Spanishpod101.com!
Megan: Okay! To start out, let’s go back to Newbie Lesson 24 where we heard the following conversation:
DIALOGUE
YMA: ¿Ustedes entienden inglés?
MARISSA: Sí, yo entiendo, si usted habla despacio.
LUKE: Sí. Mi esposa y yo entendemos inglés.
YMA: Muy bien. Empecemos el tour con la tumba de Francisco Pizarro.
M3: This time with the translation. Ahora incluiremos la traducción.
YMA: ¿Ustedes entienden inglés?
F4: “Do you all understand English?”
MARISSA: Sí, yo entiendo, si usted habla despacio.
F5: “Yes, I can, if you speak slowly!”
LUKE: Sí. Mi esposa y yo entendemos inglés.
M3: “Yes, my wife and I can understand English.”
YMA: Muy bien. Empecemos el tour con la tumba de Francisco Pizarro.
F4: “Very well! Let’s begin the tour with the tomb of Francisco Pizarro.”
David: You want to know how this may sound in Iberian Spanish? There we go!
David: Buenos días. La presentación de hoy la vamos a hacer en inglés. ¿Entienden todos inglés?
Megan: Yo sí, pero mi compañero va a necesitar traducción.
David: No hay problema. Pueden usar los cascos que hay en sus asientos.
Megan: ¿Nos puede hacer un resumen de lo que va a hablar?
M3: Once again, slowly. Una vez más, esta vez lentamente.
David: Buenos días. La presentación de hoy la vamos a hacer en inglés. ¿Entienden todos inglés?
Megan: Yo sí, pero mi compañero va a necesitar traducción.
David: No hay problema. Pueden usar los cascos que hay en sus asientos.
Megan: ¿Nos puede hacer un resumen de lo que va a hablar?
M3: This time with the translation. Ahora incluiremos la traducción.
David: “Buenos días. La presentación de hoy la vamos a hacer en inglés. ¿Entienden todos inglés?” - “Good morning! Today’s presentation will be in English. Do you all understand English?”
Megan: “Yo sí, pero mi compañero va a necesitar traducción.” - “I do, but my colleague is going to need translation.”
David: “No hay problema. Pueden usar los cascos que hay en sus asientos.” - “That’s no problem. You can use the headphones on your seats.”
Megan: “¿Nos puede hacer un resumen de lo que va a hablar?” - “Can you give us a summary of what you’re going to talk about?”
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Megan: So, tell us, where would today’s conversation take place?
David: Okay! It’s a business presentation. We are going to find formal situation and formal language here.
Megan: Yes, it sounds a lot different from the way we’ve been talking in the other lessons.
David: Right!
Megan: So, we’re going to hear formal and respectful phrases, words like “usted”.
David: Right. We’re going to see some ways of using “usted” and “ustedes”. Okay! So, to start, let’s compare the first sentence in both versions, the Iberian version and the standard version.
Megan: Okay!
F2: ¿Ustedes entienden inglés?
F4: “Do you all understand English?”
David: “¿Ustedes entienden inglés?” And we have rewritten this Iberian version like “Buenos días. La presentación de hoy la vamos a hacer en inglés. ¿Entienden todos inglés?”. So, Megan, do you see any difference between both questions?
Megan: Yes, the main difference is that in the Iberian version you don’t say “ustedes”, do you?
David: Right. Okay, so when you say “entienden” you know that you are talking to “ustedes”, you know that when you are conjugating a verb, you know that this is the form for the “ustedes” version, so when we say “entienden” we know that it’s implied the “ustedes”.
Megan: Right. And so, when asking a group of people, you would ask “¿Entienden todos inglés?” or just “¿Entienden inglés?”. But, if you’re asking just some of the people in that group, not the entire group, but it’s sort of indicating a part of the group, you might address those particular people as “ustedes entienden inglés”, right? Is that right?
David: Right. Yes, so, you know, in Iberian or other version we have rewritten for the Iberian version, we wouldn’t say “ustedes” if we are talking to the whole people, but we would say “¿Ustedes entienden inglés?” if we are trying to talk to just a part of these persons.
Megan: Right, it’s sort of like “You, over there.”.
David: Yes, right.
Megan: And you’d probably be pointing at them so they would know you’re talking about them, right?
David: So, you know, I think I couldn’t tell this is a grammatical rule, but it’s where I infer from the use, in the same way if we compare this phrase in Newbie Lesson:
F3: Sí, yo entiendo, si usted habla despacio.
F5: “Yes, I can, if you speak slowly!”
David: “Sí, yo entiendo, si usted habla despacio”, to this one in the Iberian lesson “¿Nos puede hacer un resumen de lo que va a hablar?”. We can see that in the Iberian version we don’t use the subject “usted”, but it’s implied in the “puede”, “usted puede”, but we don’t say “usted”.
Megan: Right! And in this example it’s not a question of trying to make a difference between some people or the other. So, would you ever use “¿nos puede usted hacer un resumen de lo que va a hablar?”?
David: Yes, I would use, you know, I would add “usted” if I want to sound a bit more respectful. So, I would ask “¿Nos puede hacer un resumen?” and that would be respectful because I’m saying “puede” which means “usted”, but if I say “¿Nos puede usted hacer un resumen?”, if I say “usted” I’m trying to be more polite.
Megan: Even more. You’re pointing out again that there’s a difference.
David: Yes.
Megan: That reminds me of something that happened to me yesterday because I had a little “metedura de pata” where I said the wrong thing to a professor that I should’ve “tratado de usted” but I said “vosotros” when I was referring to her and the other professors, and because she’s kind of formal sort of professor, some of our professors we actually “tú”, but it just depends on how, what the relationship is like. And so then, after I made that mistake, I made a point of saying “usted” three or four times.
David: To make sure that she…
Megan: So, does she think I’m rude or does she just know that I’m a confused Gideon?
David: Yes, well, if I were her I would understand you, you just were confused.
Megan: Right!
David: Yes, you have said “usted” for three times, and…
Megan: Yes, she knows I was making up for, because honestly we don’t say “usted” a lot here in Spain, it always “me cuesta un poco, ¿no?”.
David: That’s right.
Megan: Because I have to remember.
David: But if you say “usted” you’re pointing out that you’re being extremely respectful.
Megan: I am beneath you, right? I respect you.
David: And if we go on, is there any word whose pronunciation would be remarkable, you know, you as a “guiri” here in Madrid? Do you think we can…
Megan: Well, there is one word I wanted to bring up and that’s “traducción” because here in “traducción” we have two “Cs” together and I imagine in Latin America they say “traducsión” with an “S” sound and here you have the “kth” sound which I think for English speakers this would be kind of a difficult sound. So, can you say it correctly for us?
David: Yes, “traducción”.
Megan: “Traducción”.
David: Right, very good!
Megan: Okay, good! And the other thing I wanted to bring up is the phrase “va a hablar”, because here we have “va-a-hablar”, “going to speak”, and there’s three “A” sounds all together. So, say it the way you would say it normally.
David: Okay! So, I would say “vahablar”.
Megan: “Vahablar”. So, it’s really like an extended “A” sound, it’s just one which sounds like one word “vahablar”.
David: “Vahablar”. Yes. You know, if I had to pronounce the right way, I should say “Va a hablar”, but that’s very…
Megan: Nobody ever says that, right?
David: No.
Megan: It’s impossible.
David: So you say “vahablar”.
Megan: “Vahablar”.
David: So, if you don’t know what someone is saying, you may believe this is just one word. “Vahablar”.
Megan: “Vahablar”, ya.
David: No way, this is “va a hablar”. This brings the, you know, the next subject we want to talk about and it’s the “futuro de intención”. In this version, in this Iberian version, we have three examples of we call “futuro de intención”. How would you say “futuro de intención” in English?
Megan: You know, I don’t know, I don’t know.
David: Yes, there’s no one.
Megan: It means “to be going to do something”, to use the verb “to go” in order to talk about the future. And I think it’s extremely useful for people learning Spanish, because one of the things that trips up those of us who come from a non-romance language is all of the different conjugations and so, if you learn the conjugation of the verb “ir” then you can create the future without having to necessarily conjugate the verb in the future, and then you’ll just learn it little by little.
David: Great, very good point. Okay! So, we’re going to listen to the three examples. The first one, “La presentación de hoy la vamos a hacer en inglés”, which means “Today’s presentation will be in English.” “Mi compañero va a necesitar traducción”, which is translated as “My colleague is going to need translation.”
Megan: And then we have the third clip, which we just mentioned, which is “de lo que va a hablar”.
David: So, as you can see, these three examples, they all have the same structure or pattern. They have the verb “ir” plus “a” plus the Infinitive of verb in the Spanish. And this is translated into English in a very, very similar pattern which is…
Megan: “I’m going to do something”, so the verb “to go” in the Progressive, “I am going” or “you are going” plus an Infinitive. And it’s used exactly the same in English as in Spanish, though I think maybe we use it more in English, I’m not sure. I don’t know.
David: I think it’s very, very straightforward, you know. All the time you use “I’m going to” or “I was going to”, you can translate it very, very straightforward into Spanish.
Megan: And you can say it in the Present or in the Past, “voy a hacer” or “iba a hacer”, which means “I’m going to do something” or “I was going to do something”.
David: All right!
Megan: ¿Pues terminamos ahora?
David: Sí. Vamos a terminar.
Megan: Okay! ¡Vale!
OUTRO
David: Okay! So, I think that’s everything for today’s lesson.
Megan: Remember that this lesson references Newbie Lesson 24 which you can pick up at Spanishpod101.com and while you’re there make sure to check out the grammar point in this lesson’s PDF and also the other Regional Lessons for Perú and Costa Rica.
David: All right, so… ¡Hasta la próxima!
Megan: ¡Nos vemos!

Grammar

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Dialogue - Iberian

Dialogue - Standard

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SpanishPod101.com
Thursday at 6:30 pm
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Thanks to Kevin Macleod for the music in today's lesson. In many cultures, it is normal for children and young adults to study and live with their parents until their late twenties when they get married. In the USA, people often leave home and live on campus at the age of 18. Has anyone out on Spod101 visited a Spanish university and witnessed this aspect of their culture? What was your impression? I know that when I studied at the University of Sevilla, I found it strange that the school had no dorms at first as I got used to the Spanish college life... -Cheers, David (Spod101)

Carlos
Friday at 8:15 am
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I live near the largest University in Costa Rica. They also have no dorms whatsoever. I find this surprising and kinda sad (my college years hold very good memories). Even without dorms, these students can and do party, and they party a lot! From talking to students, it seems to me that college here is more like extended high school.