Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Natalia: Buenos días, soy Natalia.
Carlos: What’s going on? My name is Carlos.
Natalia: Newbie series, Season 2, Lesson #13.
Carlos: How much do you charge per kilo? My name is Carlos and with me, as always, it is Natalia, the better half of this spanishpod101.com team.
Natalia: The better half?
Carlos: Yeah, you are the one who gives all the information.
Natalia: Hmm okay.
Carlos: Fine, I am the better half.
Natalia: No I mean I am just surprised because it’s been so long since you say something nice that you know, one forgets.
Carlos: See, it’s like you do it too much and then you get irritated like just surprise them every now and then….
Natalia: No, no, no….
Carlos: Natie, you have a washing machine in your house right?
Natalia: I told you before. I do.
Carlos: I still need one. I have taken my laundry into a place for them to do it.
Natalia: How much does that cost?
Carlos: Well it varies. The prices somewhat bothers me. I just get nervous about my clothes and I swear, I keep missing clothes.
Natalia: That’s why you always wear the same clothes.
Carlos: Yes.
Natalia: Carlos, you need to buy a washer now.
Carlos: It’s easier said than done but I will say it’s on the list.
Natalia: How much did your Oven and Fridge cost?
Carlos: Like I said cheaper than it would have been in San Jose.
Natalia: Audience, Carlos hey it’s talking about money.
Carlos: What’s our grammar topic for today Natalia?
Natalia: Carlos, today we are going to cover something that is very, very basic and practical.
Carlos: Great. I can’t wait.
Natalia: Good because here it comes to conversation.
Carlos: So you know what time it is audience?
Natalia: Open up the lesson PDF read along and get every single word.
Carlos: That’s what usually happens when people read.
Natalia: How smart Carlitos, how smart!
DIALOGUE
ADELA: ¡Buenos días, joven!
QUIQUE: Buenos días.
ADELA: ¿Va a dejar esta bolsa para lavar?
QUIQUE: Sí. ¿Cuánto cobran por kilo?
ADELA: No tiene nada que lavar al seco, ¿cierto?
QUIQUE: No, todo es al agua.
ADELA: Cuesta cuatro soles por kilo… Su bolsa pesa cinco kilos… Son veinte soles. Su ropa estará lista a las siete.
Carlos: And now slowly. Una vez más esta vez lentamente.
ADELA: ¡Buenos días, joven!
QUIQUE: Buenos días.
ADELA: ¿Va a dejar esta bolsa para lavar?
QUIQUE: Sí. ¿Cuánto cobran por kilo?
ADELA: No tiene nada que lavar al seco, ¿cierto?
QUIQUE: No, todo es al agua.
ADELA: Cuesta cuatro soles por kilo… Su bolsa pesa cinco kilos… Son veinte soles. Su ropa estará lista a las siete.
Carlos: And now with the translation. Ahora incluiremos la traducción.
ADELA: ¡Buenos días, joven!
ADELA: Morning, Sir!
QUIQUE: Buenos días.
QUIQUE: Good morning.
ADELA: ¿Va a dejar esta bolsa para lavar?
ADELA: Are you going to leave this bag to be washed?
QUIQUE: Sí. ¿Cuánto cobran por kilo?
QUIQUE: Yes. How much do you charge per kilo?
ADELA: No tiene nada que lavar al seco, ¿cierto?
ADELA: You don't have anything that needs to be dry cleaned, right?
QUIQUE: No, todo es al agua.
QUIQUE: No, it's all machine-safe.
ADELA: Cuesta cuatro soles por kilo… Su bolsa pesa cinco kilos… Son veinte soles. Su ropa estará lista a las siete.
ADELA: It costs four soles per kilo... Your bag weighs five kilos... That's twenty soles. Your laundry will be ready at seven o'clock.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Carlos: Nice same day service. There is this little Laundromat around the corner for my apartment in Manhattan they just take all my stuff too. Like I swear, you drop it off at like 10 AM, by 3 o'clock, done, fold it, the whole nine.
Natalia: Carlos, there is one around here.
Carlos: Well no, there is one but they take like days. Now it’s a dry-cleaning there ones?
Natalia: They charge me $4 for all my clothes. Why are you complaining so much? Stop whining.
Carlos: Only $4?
Natalia: Yeah. Stop whining and just dry, wash your clothes by hand and get some arms going and that’s it.
Carlos: Well now that I have those two sinks in my kitchen, I am going to start.
Natalia: Look at him bragging about his house. Let’s go on.
Carlos: It’s not done yet.
Natalia: Let’s go on. By the way audience, Carlos got a new house and that’s why we are getting all these conversations about houses and supplies and ah…
Carlos: So Natie, did you buy a kitchen? No/Yes.
Natalia: What did you buy for your knowhow’s?
Carlos: Natie, are you cooking over a row of candles?
Natalia: No Natie yeah. Natie, what have you? Shut up. Natie, what did you buy?
Carlos: Recycled light bulbs.
Natalia: Stop it. Let’s go to vocabulary because I am feeling miserable.
Carlos: Natalia, I didn’t know they made those.
Natalia: I am going to start charity for Natie on the forum. I will give you my paypal.
Carlos: The poor woman is cooking over a row of candles she bought at Hipermas.
Natalia: Shut up. What is this? Carlos, vocabulary.
VOCAB LIST
Carlos: Alright. Okay let’s go to the vocabulary Natie. First up, we have a feminine noun.
Natalia: bolsa
Carlos: Bag.
Natalia: bol-sa, bolsa
Carlos: Next up we have a verb
Natalia: cobrar
Carlos: To charge
Natalia: co-brar, cobrar
Carlos: And then we have an adjective.
Natalia: seco, seca
Carlos: Dry.
Natalia: se-co, se-ca, seco seca
Carlos: And then we have a feminine noun.
Natalia: agua
Carlos: Water.
Natalia: a-gua. agua
Carlos: Next up a verb.
Natalia: pesar
Carlos: To weigh.
Natalia: pe-sar, pesar
Carlos: And last but not least, a feminine noun.
Natalia: ropa
Carlos: Clothes, laundry.
Natalia: ro-pa, ropa. Carlos, you know what?
Carlos: What?
Natalia: These ones are too easy for you to just repeat them. I’d say you should make a sentence with each.
Carlos: And…
Natalia: Give it a try. Let’s do with three of them.
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Carlos: Okay. Natalia quiere comprar una bolsa nueva en Elsi
Natalia: Sort of because usually bolsa is for like a bag that is like supermarket bag. Bolso is more like the ones the girls wear but I mean.
Carlos: Oh that’s actually a good point to point out and okay…
Natalia: I can see the fumes coming out of his head.
Carlos: Necesito lavar mi ropa.
Natalia: Uhoo, Need to wash my laundry?
Carlos: Yes need to wash my laundry and me encanta agua.
Natalia: Me encanta el agua.
Carlos: Me encanta el agua. I love water.
Natalia: Me encanta tomar agua.
Carlos: Me encanta tomar agua. Estoy seco. Now we are beginning with another one of Natalia’s obsessions.
Natalia: I am not going through the list again Carlos.
Carlos: Well you don’t have to. It’s our first word bolsa but like you said, now bolsa is really a supermarket bag.
Natalia: I do love bags and I have – I am not going to tell you how many I have.
Carlos: Okay pretty much I have known her for 7 months and I have never seen her with the same bag twice.
Natalia: That’s why I don’t have money for my electronics in my house.
Carlos: She buys a lot of bags but is that how we are using it here?
Natalia: Carlos, it’s being used differently here.
Carlos: How so?
Natalia: Well bolsa does mean bag. In this case, we are talking about una bolsa de ropa, a laundry bag.
Carlos: But that isn’t the only way to use it.
Natalia: Not at all, you know that bolsa is used all the time.
Carlos: Right. So when you buy something at a little store, someone may ask you: ¿Le doy una bolsa?. Can I give you a bag? Le doy una bolsa.
Natalia: Also if you want to describe a little bag or a baggie, you can use the diminutive and say una bolsita.
Carlos: Now I know our next word from one of our Costa Rican lessons.
Natalia: Seco
Carlos: Dry but we were talking about thirst. Here it’s different.
Natalia: When we are talking about laundry, we use the phrase al seco. So lavar al seco means to dry clean.
Carlos: I was thinking about a dryer.
Natalia: That would be una secadora.
Carlos: ¿Porqué es tan caro lavar la ropa aquí?
Natalia: ¿Porqué es tan caro lavar la ropa aquí? Carlos because people usually have a washing machine. Not many people pay to have their clothes washed and people have to make a living.
Carlos: Yes I stay in an apartment.
Natalia: You are seeing how the economy is. So yeah stop complaining and pay people so they can feed their families.
Carlos: You just caught me looking at the economy.
Natalia: Ai Carlos.
Carlos: Now agua is a word that shouldn’t need much of an explanation.
Natalia: You would think so but...
Carlos: But what?
Natalia: Is the word agua, water, a masculine or a feminine noun?
Carlos: Wait that is a good question. Now I would think it was feminine because it ends with A.
Natalia: Is that your final answer?
Carlos: Well no because you already corrected me on it.
Natalia: Tick tock hmm…
Carlos: So you wouldn’t be asking about it.
Natalia: Oh look at him ramble. Carlos, Carlos, Carlos, you got a point at least.
Carlos: Now I go for a masculine noun.
Natalia: But it is a feminine noun that takes a masculine article in the singular.
Carlos: Why would you say it like that?
Natalia: The reason is this. It will be very difficult to say la agua since the two As will be adjacent. So in order to avoid this, we say el agua so that the letter L comes in between them.
Carlos: Okay so this is another one of those things that should be memorized.
Natalia: Right. It’s good to learn though because when there is an adjective that describes the agua it needs to be feminine el agua esta fria, the water is cold.
Carlos: Okay but what about when we are talking about laundry?
Natalia: When we are talking about laundry, we use the phrase al agua to describe clothes that can be washed in the machine and don’t need to be dry-cleaned. It’s kind of like saying machine safe.
Carlos: Next word
Natalia: pesar
Carlos: Pesar. To weigh.
Natalia: Pesas más que un elefante. You weigh more than an elephant.
Carlos: A small elephant.
Natalia: Ai Carlos.
Carlos: That’s just an example audience. She isn’t talking to me. This is an ar verb of first conjugation verb.
Natalia: Which means?
Carlos: Well which means that it will follow the patterns with other verbs of this type like hablar or caminar. For example, yo peso, tu pesas, el pesa, etc etc.
Natalia: Okay you are learning.
Carlos: I try.
Natalia: Ropa
Carlos: And that’s easy. That means clothes.
Natalia: It also means laundry. It’s a feminine noun.
Carlos: So that will be la ropa.
Natalia: Exactly. Let’s learn a related word.
Carlos: Dime
Natalia: The word guardarropa which means wardrobe.
Carlos: Guardarropa.
Natalia: Guardarropa.
Carlos: Guardarropa.
Natalia: Uhoo look at the way that the Spanish word ropa turns into rope.
Carlos: For example.
Natalia: Necesita comprar un guardarropa nuevo.
Carlos: Don’t hit on my stilo.
LESSON FOCUS
Natalia: On your stilo? That is terrible. You know what, for today’s grammar, remember we have something very basic and practical.
Carlos: Basic and practical are good and that means they are easy.
Natalia: Carlos, you’ve said basic and practical are good twice today. Getting old you know Mr. Know it all.
Carlos: I am trying not to say basic.
Natalia: Why don’t you just count till 50 then?
Carlos: So we are studying cardinal numbers.
Natalia: Don’t stall count.
Carlos: Okay flashback to high school Spanish class. Okay, uno, dos , tres.
Natalia: Easy but important Carlos.
Carlos: Yes.
Natalia: Don’t count till 50 anymore.
Carlos: Why not?
Natalia: Because I say so.
Carlos: Okay well numbers are one of the first thing I memorize. So you know I can do this.
Natalia: But okay, okay, okay let’s review how to count till 50.
Carlos: Uno, dos, tres, cuatro, cinco, seis, siete, ocho, nueve, diez.
Natalia: That’s right, uno, dos, tres, cuatro, cinco, seis, siete, ocho, nueve, diez. Here is an example: Te he dicho cinco veces y todavia no recuerdas. I have told you five times but you still don’t remember.
Carlos: Natie, how about 11 to 20? Once, doce, trece, catorce, quince, dieciseis, diecisiete, dieciocho, diecinueve, veinte.
Natalia: Once, doce, trece, catorce, quince, dieciseis, diecisiete, dieciocho, diecinueve, veinte. For example: Trabaje por diecisiete años en ese edificio.
Carlos: I worked for 18 years in that building.
Natalia: All right now 21 to 30.
Carlos: That would be: Veintiuno, veintidos, veintitres, veinticuatro, veinticinco, veintiseis, veintisiete, veintiocho, veintinueve, treinta.
Natalia: Again that’s: Veintiuno, veintidos, veintitres, veinticuatro, veinticinco, veintiseis, veintisiete, veintiocho, veintinueve, treinta. Veintidos más veintitres son cuarenta y cinco. 22 plus 23 equals 45.
Carlos: On to the 30s. Treinta y uno, treinta y dos, treinta y tres, treinta y cuatro, treinta y cinco, treinta y seis, treinta siete, treinta ocho, treinta y nueve, cuarenta.
Natalia: Oh if they fire you, you can work at a supermarket counting boxes now.
Carlos: I am going to have to to afford new things.
Natalia: Okay, Treinta y uno, treinta y dos, treinta y tres, treinta y cuatro, treinta y cinco, treinta y seis, treinta siete, treinta ocho, treinta y nueve, cuarenta. Here is an example before you even ask Carlos. Cuando mi mamá tenía treinta y dos años decidió cambiar su profesión.
Carlos: When my mom was 32, she decided to change her profession.
Natalia: Okay let’s go for the 40 group.
Carlos: Cuarenta y uno, cuarenta y dos, cuarenta y tres, cuarenta y cuatro, cuarenta y cinco, cuarenta y seis, cuarenta y siete, cuarenta y ocho, cuarenta y nueve, cincuenta.
Natalia: Good. Cuarenta y uno, cuarenta y dos, cuarenta y tres, cuarenta y cuatro, cuarenta y cinco, cuarenta y seis, cuarenta y siete, cuarenta y ocho, cuarenta y nueve, cincuenta. Now you give the last example.
Carlos: Estudie por cuarenta y cinco minutos.
Natalia: I studied for 45 minutes.
Carlos: That wasn’t too bad.
Natalia: Because you have me here to correct you Carlos but…
Carlos: You didn’t correct me once.
Natalia: Okay, okay, okay Carlos tell us about a time when you wish that you knew the number in Spanish correctly?
Carlos: Okay yeah definitely when I first came down to Costa Rica and I wasn’t used to Colones. I had to send my deposit down for my apartment before I even got here and they told me the address and I didn’t believe them because they were like [*]. I was like what? I don’t understand the directions down here. So that’s when I wished I really knew the numbers better.
Natalia: Anyways, it’s time for today's tarea. In today’s grammar section, we’ve covered cardinal numbers 1 to 50. Now I am going to give you five phrases in English, each of which includes a number. What you have to do is translate this phrase to Spanish using the correct Spanish number. Are you ready? #1, 35 years, #2, 11 books, #3, 27 computers, #4, 49 minutes, #5, 50 days.
OUTRO
Carlos: Alright. Now remember, you can always check out the answers with comments on the answers in the premium audio track called Tarea, homework.
Natalia: Carlos?
Carlos: Yes.
Natalia: Please remind our audience.
Carlos: About what?
Natalia: About the lessons.
Carlos: Okay the whole thing about them being used in tandem with the language tools in the premium learning center.
Natalia: You can say it so much better. You can say, please audience, remember, these lessons are made using in tandem with the language tools in the premium learning center.
Carlos: These lessons are designed to be used in tandem with the language tools in the premium learning center at spanishpod101.com
Natalia: Well you know, if you don’t already have a premium membership, you can always go and sign up for your 7-Day trial and see what it’s all about.
Carlos: Well that’s it for today. We will see you next time guys. Chao!
Natalia: Chao!

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Dialogue - Bilingual

Tarea

Vocabulary

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SpanishPod101.com
Wednesday at 6:02 am
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Thanks to Herman Pearl for the music in today’s lesson.


I have had my laundry done in Costa Rica and NY (yes, I am that lazy!). I've noticed distinct differences. Anybody out there want to share first!?

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SpanishPod101.com
Friday at 4:40 pm
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Hello Esteban,


Thank you for posting.

We edited the sample sentence. We will upload the audio file as soon as possible.


Thank you for your patience.

Let us know if you have any question.

Sincerely,

Lena

Team SpanishPod101.com

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SpanishPod101.com
Tuesday at 10:42 am
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Hola Esteban,


Thank for your comments.

1. Here "no mas" means "only" to be exact. But in the sentence is translated as "just" which is also valid to the meaning of the sentence.

2. We'll check into that number. Its obviously too expensive. :sweat_smile:


Saludos,

Carla

Team SpanishPod101.com

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EstebanDirks@gmail.com
Saturday at 3:35 pm
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I have questions about a couple of examples from the expanded vocab section


1. Las medias pueden ser lavadas al agua no más.

"The socks can just be water washed."


Since 'no más" means no more, it seems like the English translation should be 'The socks can no longer be water washed.


2.Yo pagué 1,300 pesos por esta tonta bolsa. Quiero mi dinero de regreso.

"I paid 900 dollars for this silly bag. I want my money back."


Why doesn't the English translation just use 1,300 pesos? $900 is a pretty expensive bag.

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SpanishPod101.com
Saturday at 3:04 pm
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Hola Jhonathan,


Sorry about he inconvenience!

Our team will correct the lesson as soon as possible.

The correct cardinal numbers are:

dieciséis, diecisiete, dieciocho, diecinueve

veintiuno, veintidós, veintitrés, veinticuatro, veinticinco, veintiséis, veintisiete, veintiocho, veintinueve


Carla

Team SpanishPod101.com

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Jonathan
Thursday at 12:52 am
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Hola todos,


Tengo una pregunta:


In the lesson notes, the cardinal numbers for 16-19 and 21-29 are written like this:


diez y seis, diez y siete, diez y ocho, diez y nueve

veinte y uno, veinte y dos, veinte y tres, veinte y cuatro, veinte y cinco, veinte y seis, veinte y

siete, veinte y ocho, veinte y nueve


But I have seen them written like this elsewhere:


dieciséis, diecisiete, dieciocho, diecinueve

veintiuno, veintidós, veintitrés, veinticuatro, veinticinco, veintiséis, veintisiete, veintiocho, veintinueve


Cual es la diferencia?


Gracias!


Jonathan

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SpanishPod101.com
Monday at 6:30 pm
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The pronunciation of certain numbers is difficult. Are there any that stick out in your mind?