Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Fernando: Welcome everyone, I’m Fernando, this is Gengo Spanish lesson 11 - Taxi.
JP: Hey, Fernando. welcome everyone to SpanishPOD101.com. With us, you'll learn to speak Spanish with fun and effective lessons. We also provide you with cultural insights and tips you won't find in a textbook. So Fernando, what are we going to talk about today?
Fernando: In this lesson, you will learn how to express actions in the immediate future. This conversation takes place in the hotel lobby. The conversation is between jimmy and the hotel receptionist. The speakers will be using the formal register.
JP: Alright, let’s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
RECEPCIONISTA: Buenos días, señor McSherry.
JIMMY: Buenos días. ¿Cómo está el clima hoy?
RECEPCIONISTA: Habrá sol por la mañana, pero en la tarde va a llover.
JIMMY: Ah, la lluvia...
RECEPCIONISTA: Sí, hoy el clima estará mal. Pero tiene suerte - la primavera es muy hermosa. Suele haber buen clima en marzo.
JIMMY: ¿De verdad?
RECEPCIONISTA: Sí señor, muy buen clima. Muchos días asoleados.
JIMMY: Muy bien. Oiga, ¿por dónde pasan los taxis?
RECEPCIONISTA: Se paran los taxis delante del hotel.
JIMMY: Muy bien, muchas gracias.
RECEPCIONISTA: De nada, señor, que le vaya bien.
JP: One more time, with the translation.
RECEPCIONISTA: Buenos días, señor McSherry.
FRONT DESK: Good morning, Mr. McSherry.
JIMMY: Buenos días. ¿Cómo está el clima hoy?
JIMMY: Good morning. What's the weather like today?
RECEPCIONISTA: Habrá sol por la mañana, pero en la tarde va a llover.
FRONT DESK: It'll be sunny in the morning, but it will rain in the afternoon.
JIMMY: Ah, la lluvia...
JIMMY: Ah, the rain...
RECEPCIONISTA: Sí, hoy el clima estará mal. Pero tiene suerte - la primavera es muy hermosa. Suele haber buen clima en marzo.
FRONT DESK: Yes, the weather's bad today, but you're lucky. Springtime is beautiful. It's usually good weather in March.
JIMMY: ¿De verdad?
JIMMY: Really?
RECEPCIONISTA: Sí señor, muy buen clima. Muchos días asoleados.
FRONT DESK: Yes, sir, it's very nice. Lots of sunny days.
JIMMY: Muy bien. Oiga, ¿por dónde pasan los taxis?
JIMMY: Cool. Hey, where do the taxis stop?
RECEPCIONISTA: Se paran los taxis delante del hotel.
FRONT DESK: They stop right in front of the hotel.
JIMMY: Muy bien, muchas gracias.
JIMMY: Cool, thanks.
RECEPCIONISTA: De nada, señor, que le vaya bien.
FRONT DESK: You're welcome, sir, have a good day.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
JP: So looks like we're talking about the weather today.
Fernando: Yes, you can always talk about the weather.
JP: So how does Jimmy ask about the weather?
Fernando: He asks ¿Cómo está el clima hoy?
JP: ¿Cómo está el clima hoy? Doesn't clima usually mean 'climate?' I usually say "el tiempo" for weather.
Fernando: Yah dude, loosen up.
JP: Ok. Anyway, so there's all this weather talk... Did he get an answer on how the weather's going to be?
Fernando: Habrá sol por la mañana, pero en la tarde va a llover.
JP: Sunny in the morning, rainy at night. Sounds like Seattle.
Fernando: And then they go on to talk about what the weather in Cancún is usually like.
JP: Usually nicer, right?
Fernando: Especially in the spring and summer. And then after that Jimmy asks where to get a taxi.
JP: Don't taxis usually stop in front of the hotel?
Fernando: Exactly, that's what the receptionist says.
JP: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
VOCAB LIST
Fernando: soler [natural native speed]
JP: to do often
Fernando: soler [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Fernando: soler [natural native speed]
JP: Next.
Fernando: delante [natural native speed]
JP: in front
Fernando: delante [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Fernando: delante [natural native speed]
JP: Next.
Fernando: Oiga... [natural native speed]
JP: Hey..., Excuse me...
Fernando: Oiga... [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Fernando: Oiga... [natural native speed]
JP: Next.
Fernando: asoleado [natural native speed]
JP: sunny
Fernando: asoleado [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Fernando: asoleado [natural native speed]
JP: Next.
Fernando: pero [natural native speed]
JP: but
Fernando: pero [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Fernando: pero [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
JP: Let's have a closer look at some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Fernando: The first one is soler.
JP: Ok, soler is a hard verb to translate, it is a verb but we don't have a verb like it in English. Soler means to do something often, and you always follow it with an infinitive. So for example, I often speak spanish.
Fernando: Yo suelo hablar español
JP: There you heard the 1st person form of soler "suelo" and then the infinitive hablar, to speak. so yo suelo hablar español.
Fernando: Right. That's the verb soler. The next item we have is delante.
JP: Delante is an adverb, means in front, if you want a preposition, you can say delante de. So "in front of the house" would be
Fernando: Delante de la casa. Delante.
JP: Cool, what's next.
Fernando: We got Oiga.
JP: Oiga. literally this is "listen," or "listen up" and it's the command form of the verb oír. Oiga. Actually, in Spanish it's an attention getter, right, if you want to get the waiter's attention, or someone.
Fernando: Yes, it's what you say when you want to flag somebody down. And it's a polite way to do it. Ok, next is asoleado.
JP: Ok, this is a tricky one. Asoleado. In the dialog they use asoleado to mean "sunny." which is what a lot of people say. Asoleado.
Fernando: What's your point?
JP: Well, in Standard Spanish, that's considered a mistake, you're supposed to say soleado for sunny, and asoleado means overexposed to the sun.
Fernando: Ok, but a lot of people say asoleado to mean sunny.
JP: Right, which is why we use it in this dialog. Anyway, you can tell that he means sunny from the context.
Fernando: Ok, the last item is the conjunction pero.
JP: Pero. it means but, or however. pero.
LESSON FOCUS
Fernando: So what's the grammar point today?
JP: We're going to be looking at the periphrastic future...
Fernando: Which is?
JP: Which is a fancy way of saying you're going to go do something in the future. going to do. So in Spanish we use the verb ir, plus the preposition a, plus the infinitive. So if I say I'm going to relax.
Fernando: Voy a descansar.
JP: Right so we have ir in the first person, which is voy. then you have a which means to. so voy a means I'm going to. then the infinitive for to relax.
Fernando: Descansar.
JP: Put it all together, and you have voy a descansar. I'm going to relax.
Fernando: Voy a descansar. Now of you course you can use other subjects, so "van a descansar" would be...
JP: they're going to relax, van a descansar.
Fernando: Vamos a descansar.
JP: We're going to relax. Vamos a descansar. It's pretty easy. No in the dialog we hear that it's going to rain.
Fernando: Va a llover.
JP: Exactly. Remember that llover means “to rain,” and it never takes a subject, but when you do conjugate it, you use the 3rd person singular. That's why we hear va a llover. that va is the third person singular.
OUTRO
Fernando: That just about does it for today, JP.
JP: Premium members don't forget to access the Premium Feed. The Premium Feed is a powerful Web 2.0 technology which allows you to get all of our content through iTunes, with just a click of a button. That includes the PDFs, conversation only tracks, review tracks. To access the Premium Feed or to find out more, visit SpanishPod101.com. It’s time to go, so hasta luego.
Fernando: Hasta luego.

5 Comments

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SpanishPod101.com
Monday at 6:30 pm
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Can you tell us what the weather is like where you are in Spanish?

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SpanishPod101.com
Friday at 4:25 am
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Hola William,


Thank you for your comment.

Si, muy bien. Dependiendo el contexto puede significar "soler" - use to

Ejemplos.

Suelo tomar desayuno antes de salir al trabajo. - I use to eat breakfast before going to work.

Suelo caminar a todos lados. - I use to walk everywhere.


Sigamos practicando!


Saludos,

Carla

Team SpanishPod101.com

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William
Friday at 5:30 am
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Discupe, ¿pero creo que se pueda tambien significar "use to" esta palabra "Soler" según el "Spanish Dict"?

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SpanishPod101.com
Monday at 2:31 pm
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Hi Milton Sanders,

thank you for the comment.

We're trying to do our best to deliver high quality lessons and we believe your feedback helps us improve the way we design our future lessons.

Thank you again!


Stefania/SpanishPod101.com

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Milton Sanders
Saturday at 1:08 pm
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I liked the lesson. However I like the 15 munite lessons more, they give me more to try to think about. I hear more of the language spoken by the native speaker. Food for thought. Thanks from Milton.