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How to say "see you tomorrow" in Spanish?

How to say "see you tomorrow" in Spanish?

Postby watermen » December 23rd, 2007 8:29 pm

It is spoken too fast. I always don't get it, I heard the word "manana"...

Can some kindly tell me that phrase, thanks.
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Postby Joseph » December 25th, 2007 12:35 am

We often say "¡hasta mañana!" which means "until tomorrow!" or "¡nos vemos mañana!" which means "we'll see each other tomorrow!". Both of these are usually translated as "see you tomorrow!".

Also, remember that the "h" is always silent in Spanish. One more thing, which may help you understand why it's difficult to hear. Because "hasta" ends in a vowel, the last phoneme (sound) is linked to the next consonant: the "m" of "mañana". So you may notice that the phrase sounds like this: "astamañana". Because this is "una frase hecha" (a set phrase), we tend to pronounce it as if it were one word.

Look for a future Phonetics lesson that addresses the topic of "enlace" (word-linking). ;-)

¡Nos vemos mañana! (See you tomorrow!)

Joseph
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Postby watermen » December 25th, 2007 10:31 am

joseph wrote:We often say "¡hasta mañana!" which means "until tomorrow!" or "¡nos vemos mañana!" which means "we'll see each other tomorrow!". Both of these are usually translated as "see you tomorrow!".

Also, remember that the "h" is always silent in Spanish. One more thing, which may help you understand why it's difficult to hear. Because "hasta" ends in a vowel, the last phoneme (sound) is linked to the next consonant: the "m" of "mañana". So you may notice that the phrase sounds like this: "astamañana". Because this is "una frase hecha" (a set phrase), we tend to pronounce it as if it were one word.

Look for a future Phonetics lesson that addresses the topic of "enlace" (word-linking). ;-)

¡Nos vemos mañana! (See you tomorrow!)

Joseph


Thanks a lot for explaining. Does Hasta means "see"?
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Hasta mañana

Postby davidperez » December 26th, 2007 8:43 pm

Hi watermen:

hasta = until
mañana = tomorrow

Saludos desde Madrid (Regards from Madrid),
David.
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Sinalefa

Postby mcurtin » April 2nd, 2008 4:41 am

Joseph,
Is what you are talking about the same as the concept of sinalefa?
EG, (from web)

Y es que en la noche hay siempre un fuego oculto...

when spoken by a normal Spanish speaker it sounds like this:

Yes quen la nochay siemprun fuegoculto

It's this aspect of spoken Spanish that frustrates my understanding of native speakers. Do any of the experts have any tips and tricks for improving your ear for this occurrence which seems quite common in spoken Spanish. Of course, we do similar things in English.
Thanks a lot
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Postby Joseph » April 6th, 2008 3:53 am

The linking of words in spoken Spanish is such an important aspect of the language.

This is a good example, and an accurate one too:

Y es que en la noche hay siempre un fuego oculto...

when spoken by a normal Spanish speaker it sounds like this:

Yes quen la nochay siemprun fuegoculto

If you're interested in the terminology, "sinalefa" es in the fusion of adjacent vowels from separate words and "ecthlipsis" is the fusion of consonants.

As you can see in your example, these two aspects pop up all the time. How to train your ear...?

First, if you are in a place where there are Spanish-speakers, I would highly suggest making a friend. Maybe they will want to learn English, and you can meet for coffee once in a while to talk.

Second, read out loud in Spanish. Don't worry if you don't understand everything you read. It will come. Here, you're practicing the mechanics of speech.

Third, memorize a song or poem by listening to it being performed. By doing this, you'll study the speech patterns at a very deep level. Here's a place where you can get audio and text for some poems in Spanish: http://www.vozdelapoesia.net/mp3.html

Fourth, repeat new phrases that you learn, instead of single words. I'm not sure what level you're at, but, for example, if you learn "de la mañana", you can recognize it as "delamañana".

Let me know if this helps. I'll try to think of some more ways. By asking these questions, you've already taken a big step.

Que te vaya bien y que tengas paciencia, con el tiempo y el estudio aprenderás.

Joseph
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